News from Schwing Bioset

Schwing Bioset Trailer Mounted FSP 1103 Screw Presses Now Available for Contract Operations

 

Written by Kelly Kramer

 

Schwing Bioset is pleased to announce that we can now help solve your dewatering challenges with our fully automated trailer mounted FSP 1103 screw press dewatering systems. Available for onsite demonstrations and/or contract operations, the 1103 screw press is one of our largest models and is engineered for durability, reliability, ease of operation, and low power consumption, making the units an efficient method to dewater.

As with all of our screw presses, our mobile units are designed for quick set up, ease of use, and high-performance for dewatering all types of wastewater. 

One of the screw press features our customers are most excited about is the self-cleaning wash cycles. With low wash water requirements and automation, dewatering operations do not need to be suspended during cleaning and a cleaning cycle typically lasts less than five minutes.

Once dewatered, the solids can be treated, loaded, hauled away, and/or beneficially reused, depending upon the method of the end user.

For more information on our mobile screw press units, please contact our Regional Manager nearest to your plant. The screw press and Schwing Bioset’s full product offering can be viewed here.

 

Schwing Bioset Mobile Screw Press   Schwing Bioset Mobile Screw Press

 

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Tags: Wastewater Treatment, Screw Press, Dewatering, Mobile Screw Press

Screw Press Proves Efficient in Dewatering MBR Sludge

 

Written by Tom Welch

Version also Published in TPO Magazine, August 2019

 

The Decatur, AR, WWTP had existing dewatering technology that proved to be undersized and inefficient. With the additional demands of a new plant upgrade, Operations staff were struggling to meet current dewatering requirements.

The Design Build team and Owner selected an FSP 802 screw press from Schwing Bioset to replace the existing equipment. The new equipment was installed in the same building with primarily service connection modifications. The screw press started operating in November of 2018.

The improvements in the dewatering operations are remarkable, as it is saving Decatur operational expenses in every category. Dry solids content of the dewatered biosolids have improved from an average of 13% to 17%, resulting in less cake to haul. Solids capture rate has improved from less than 80% to 95%, resulting in a lower return load to the plant. Polymer usage is now at 18 pounds active per dry ton, which is well below the consumption rate of the previous technology reducing polymer expenditures.

In addition to these performance improvements, the dewatering capacity has more than doubled. Where it used to take at least two days to load a 25-ton trailer, the plant can now fill a trailer in 6.5 hours, reducing operator efforts in turn. 

With the widest range of machine sizes for several applications, and mobile pilot units available for testing your materials, Schwing Bioset is your comprehensive solutions provider for dewatering.

Click here to learn more about our products or contact our regional manager closest to you.

 

Decatur Dewatering Screw Press

 

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Tags: Biosolids, Screw Press, Dewatering, Membrane Bioreactor

West Rankin Utility Authority to Install Three Schwing Bioset Screw Presses

 

Written by Kelly Kramer, October 2019

 

The West Rankin Utility Authority (WRUA) provides services to several communities in Western Rankin County in Mississippi. WRUA generates approximately 10 to 12 million gallons of wastewater each day, which is currently transmitted to the Savanna Street Wastewater Treatment Plant in Jackson. To take advantage of this service, the authority has to pay Jackson, which costs it a few million dollars each year.

In an effort to save costs in the long run, and operate independently, WRUA has decided to build a brand-new wastewater treatment plant of its own. Schwing Bioset is pleased to announce that our team will be part of this project, with WRUA ordering three of our largest dewatering screw presses, the model FSP1203’s.

The FSP 1203’s are designed to handle a capacity of up to 7,468 dry pounds per hour. For West Rankin, the expectation is to process 24 dry tons per day operating at 60 hours per week, dewatering of 0.75% solids WAS with a 17% solids sludge cake output, and a ≥ 90% solids capture rate.

Schwing Bioset Screw Press     Schwing Bioset Screw Press

The West Rankin screw press system is designed for continuous dewatering of flocculated slurry and consists of a screw press dewatering unit, a flocculation tank, a rotary lobe sludge feed pump, and a liquid polymer blending system. Slow movement and the high-quality design of the structural components guarantee a high service life, and the back-washing cycle cleans the screens automatically so dewatering operations will not be interrupted during washing cycle.

With the new equipment in the new wastewater treatment plant, Schwing Bioset will be able to help West Rankin to bring its system into compliance with federal water quality laws, increase plant capacity, and save on costs in the long run.

To learn more about Schwing Bioset’s dewatering screw presses, contact Chuck at cwanstrom@schwingbioset.com or visit our website.

 

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Tags: Screw Press, Dewatering, Wastewater Treatment Plant

Membrane Bioreactors Increase Effluent Quality at Hotel and Casino

 

Written by Surya Pidaparti

 

The Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians operates a hotel and casino in Chumash, California. The sewage from the facilities used to be treated by a conventional sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and sand filtration. As the hotel and its vicinity expanded, the existing SBR was not able to treat the increased flow, which was the major driving force for upgrading the facility. As the area is a high drought zone, a requirement of any permit for expanding the hotel would require water reuse.

Two options were selected to evaluate for the wastewater treatment expansion project – an expansion of the existing SBR alongside the existing and abandoning the SBR in favor of a Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) system. An extensive engineering evaluation showed that the MBR system had a total construction cost of $3.3 million versus a cost of $5.3 million for the SBR.

Econity MBR’s were selected, as offered by Schwing Bioset, for not only their performance, but their flexibility in design. With a cartridge and cassette configuration, maintaining the membranes becomes a simple exercise. The MBR system was built using two containers to minimize disruptions to current plant operations and to fit in the limited site space available. The facility was commissioned in January of 2016.

With the improvements, there has been a significant increase in the facility’s capacity all while showing that that the effluent quality, measured in turbidity (0.05 – 0.2 NTU) vastly exceeds California Title 22 requirements for reuse water (< 1NTU).

To learn more about Schwing Bioset’s MBR systems, contact Surya at spidaparti@schwingbioset.com or visit our website here.

 

Schwing Bioset Membrane Bioreactors  Schwing Bioset Membrane Bioreactors

 

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Tags: Wastewater Treatment, Membrane Bioreactor

Schwing Bioset Custom Solutions Featured at WEFTEC 2019 Exhibit

 

Written by Kelly Kramer, August 2019

 

Schwing Bioset, Inc. (SBI) is once again exhibiting at the 2019 WEFTEC Technical Expo in Chicago on September 23-25. Please be sure to stop by our booth (#2307) while you're on the exhibit floor to see our equipment in person, check out product videos, and learn about how we help water and wastewater treatment plants. This year we will be showcasing several pieces of equipment.

Schwing Bioset is your complete solids handling provider, offering the widest range of high-performance screw presses, one of which will be displayed on the WEFTEC floor. Our screw press offers dewatering for those needing a cost effective, durable, efficient dewatering to reduce their volume of biosolids.

We will also be displaying our Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) filtration systems that utilize hollow fiber membranes and help eliminate fouling. The units are customizable for new applications or drop in replacements are available for existing membranes.

Nutrient Recovery is becoming increasingly important and our phosphate management technology, offered under license from NuReSys, that recovers orthophosphate in the form of struvite, will also be on display.

Other equipment on display will be a sliding frame, biosolids piston pump, and a Bioset reactor. The Bioset system is configurable to produce either Class A or B Biosolids, while each unit in the system is completely customizable to fit each plant.

Featured in the Technology Center will be our Fluid Bed Dryers, Container Wagons, SBI Solutions, and our material hauling services. Struvite and fertilizer material samples will also be displayed.

“As always, we are looking forward to WEFTEC 2019.  This is the perfect place to showcase the quality of our equipment and its unique and specific features that separate us from other options in the market,” said Chuck Wanstrom, Director of New Business Development.

The SBI team members attending the show include Executives, Regional Sales Managers, Service and Aftermarket Department personnel, and more. We’ll also be joined by members of our partner companies, including Revinu, NuReSys, Econity, and The Andersons, Inc. If you would like to meet with any of these team members, please email us and we'll put you in touch with the appropriate person to assist with your needs.

Be sure to follow the Schwing Bioset, Inc. social media sites to see what we’re up to at the show. In the meantime, read about our MBR’s, Nutrient Management, Dewatering Equipment, Piston Pumps, Bioset Process, and other products hereand then stop by booth 2307 to learn more! You can also visit the conference website to view the event details, an expo map, a list of exhibitors, and more: http://www.weftec.org.

We are excited to see you at WEFTEC 2019!

Schwing Bioset WEFTEC 2019   Schwing Bioset WEFTEC 2019

About Schwing Bioset, Inc.

For more than 30 years, Schwing Bioset, Inc. has been helping wastewater treatment plants, mines, and industrial users by engineering solids handling solutions. Schwing Bioset’s custom-engineered solutions can be found in over a thousand facilities across North America and around the world.

Our products include, among others, sludge, industrial, and tunnel piston pumps, screw presses, nutrient removal and management, membrane bioreactors, sliding frame and push floor silos, fluid bed drying products, Bioset process for Class A Biosolids, container wagons, and screw conveyors. We also offer on-site demos, spare parts and equipment maintenance services, and training. 

 

 

Tags: Announcements, Events, WEFTEC, Expos

Recovering a Valuable Nutrient From the Wastewater Stream

 

Published in TPO Magazine, August 2019

 

Phosphate recovery technology offered by Schwing Bioset can be tailored to meet each facility’s specific operating challenges

 

Resource recovery is a major trend in wastewater treatment — to the task of cleaning water, facility teams are adding the capture of energy and nutrients.

One increasingly popular type of technology is the capture of phosphorus as struvite, which has market value as a fertilizer additive. One entry in that sector is Schwing Bioset, which offers a phosphate and nitrogen recovery technology under license from Belgium-based NuReSys.

The offering is unique in that it is not necessarily designed to extract revenue from nutrient capture, although that option is available. The process is designed to be tailored to each facility’s objectives in dealing with phosphate-related issues.

Besides nutrient recovery, the process has the benefits of preventing buildup of struvite scale in treatment equipment and improving dewaterability in biosolids. Wim Moerman, chief technology officer for NuReSys, and Chuck Wanstrom, director of new business development with Schwing Bioset, talked about the technology in an interview with Treatment Plant Operator.

 

Click here to read the full interview.

 

Nutrient Management Plant

 

To learn more about Schwing Bioset’s Nutrient Management solutions, visit our website here or contact your Region’s Representative.

 

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Tags: Wastewater Treatment, Struvite Recovery, Nutrient Recovery, Phosphorus Removal, Nutrient Harvesting

Storage Silos for West Palm Beach Improvement Project

 

Written by Tom Welch

 

The East Central Regional Water Reclamation Facility has a rated treatment capacity of 70 million gallons per day and serves the cities of West Palm Beach, Riviera Beach, and Lake Worth; Palm Beach County, and the Town of Palm Beach.

Prior to the anaerobic digestion improvements, the plant utilized sludge decanting to concentrate solids to 2%, aerobic digestion to partially destroy solids, and belt press dewatering to remove excess water from biosolids, with dewatered cake hauled to the Solid Waste Authority – Palm Beach County (SWAPBC) Pelletizer Facility.

To help improve the plant’s processes, the anaerobic digestion project included mechanical sludge thickening to concentrate solids to 5%, temperature-phased Anaerobic Digestion to destroy more solids, and centrifuge dewatering to remove more excess water. 

Key to the whole process are new state-of-the art sliding frame sludge storage silos from Schwing Bioset that offer the plant flexibility in its operations by providing buffer capacity between the centrifuges and trailers. Sliding frame technology has largely displaced older live bottom truck loading technology at the wastewater plants as it holds many advantages, including; vertical sidewalls, no exterior ribbing required for structural integrity, very few and simple components for O&M activities, and flexible unloading configurations to accommodate variable trailer sizes. Once the dewatered Biosolids are loaded in trailers they continue to be transported to the SAWAPBC. 

Schwing Bioset Sliding Frame Silos           Schwing Bioset Biosolids Truck Loading

 

Schwing Bioset provided a quantity of four, 55 cubic yard silos with a truck loading conveyor for efficient truck loading. Overall the project reduces hauled biosolids by 15,000+ wet tons per year and reduces truck hauling costs and trips from the plant to SWAPBC.

To learn more about Schwing Bioset’s sliding frame silos, visit our website here or contact your Region’s Representative.

 

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Tags: Sliding Frame Silos, Truck Loading, Wastewater Treatment Plant

Screw Presses Help Plant Reduce Maintenance Costs

 

Written by Chuck Wanstrom

Version also Published in TPO Magazine, August 2018

 

The city of Bradenton, Florida, operates a wastewater treatment plant that processes roughly 8 million gallon per day. The plant had historically aerobically digested their biosolids and dewatered them to 15% dry solids content using two, 2.0-meter belt filter presses. Due to the age of the belt filter presses, the maintenance expenditures were continually increasing and were creating a burden not only with expenses, but also with personnel time to keep the equipment functioning.

Bradenton began a search to identify new dewatering techniques that could replace the aging belt filter presses.  Several pilot studies were completed, and Schwing Bioset was invited to run our screw press pilot. The pilot proved successful with results of up to 21% dry solids. The Schwing Bioset screw presses were also able to fit within the confines of the available space on the second floor of the existing dewatering building. 

The Schwing Bioset equipment was chosen as the best value and was procured under a sole source contract. The two new FSP902 screw presses were designed into the existing dewatering building and were commissioned early in 2018. The dewatered biosolids exceed the old belt presses cake performance and reduces the city’s hauling and disposal costs while at the same time reducing the amount of wash water required and significantly reducing the maintenance load to city staff. 

Learn more about our screw presses or contact our regional manager closest to you.

 

Bradenton Screw Presses

 

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Tags: Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Screw Press, Dewatering, screw presses

City Converts Biosolids Processing Equipment After Fire Disaster

 

Written by Chuck Wanstrom

Version also published in TPO Magazine, February 2019

 

Home to both St. Olaf and Carleton colleges, the City of Northfield, MN, is located approximately an hour south of Minneapolis and has a population of 20,000. The wastewater plant is approximately 3 MGD and has historically produced Class A biosolids via an open alkaline and thermal stabilization process. Disaster struck in May 2018 when a fire destroyed all of the Class A biosolids processing equipment, as well as the surrounding dewatering and odor control equipment in the building. 

Rather than simply replace the old equipment, the city of Northfield evaluated current available technologies and elected to convert from belt presses to screw presses for its dewatering needs and has purchased two machines from Schwing Bioset to accomplish this. Additionally, the city will continue with Class A biosolids production, but they are converting to Schwing Bioset's Bioset process. The Bioset process is a closed process that contains odors and dust that does not require supplemental heat and has also been approved by the USEPA through the PFRP process to operate at temperatures below those specified in the 503 regulations. 

Final detail design of this pre-purchased equipment is underway and the plant is scheduled to be operational later in 2019. To help the plant bridge the gap in biosolids processing while the new facility is in being constructed, the city is also renting a mobile screw press and Bioset trailer to process their current biosolids production. 

Click here to learn more about our products or contact our regional manager closest to you.

 

Bioset Process and Screw Press Dewatering

 

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Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Screw Press, Dewatering

Schwing Bioset Process Helps Community Maximize Beneficial Reuse

 

Written by Larry Trojak, Trojak Communications

Version also published in TPO Magazine, February 2019

 

Too Valuable to Waste

A lime stabilization process helps an Arkansas city meet its goal of producing Class A biosolids to enable the resumption of beneficial use. 

The strength and resilience of the wastewater treatment industry can often be found in the innovative solutions brought to bear to address the challenges it faces. And those solutions are not being employed solely by WWTPs in big cities or even larger municipalities, but often by small or mid-size operations — entities like the Russellville (Arkansas) Pollution Control Works Facility, for example. Faced with a situation in which they could no longer land-apply their Class B biosolids, plant officials looked for alternatives and opted to upgrade their operation to create a Class A product. In doing so, they’re finding value in their byproduct and have eliminated the need to simply waste it or — as they’ve reluctantly done in the past —  landfill it. A big solution from a smaller operation? Not surprising at all.

 

Snapshot: Russellville 

Located midway between Little Rock and Fort Smith, Ark., the city of Russellville is home to several major manufacturing facilities as well as the state’s only nuclear power plant. Owned and operated by Russellville City Corporation, the city’s Pollution Control Works Facility (PCWF) serves a population of 30,000 including all of Russellville and the nearby town of Dover. The wastewater collections system consists of roughly 170 miles of gravity sewer, 18 lift stations of various pumping capacities, and 14.1 miles of force main. Approximately 9,000 homes and businesses, and the service lines connecting these homes and businesses constitute an additional 129 miles of sewers — all of which terminate at the PCWF.

According to Randy Bradley, the facility’s wastewater operations manager, the plant has undergone periodic updates in its 55-year history, but really made a seismic shift in its approach a couple years back.

“Up to that point — and still to a large part today — we were a fairly typical operation,” he said. “The plant is designed for 7.3 mgd, and once wastewater gets here, it first goes through some Duperon bar screens to remove plastics and other products that can’t be broken down in normal treatment. After the screens, it undergoes grit removal and is pumped back through the plant where it goes through the primary clarifiers, then to one of three aeration basins — two 450,000 gallon tanks and one 850,000 gallon tank — and into the final clarifiers. A final stop in a chlorine contact chamber allows us to inject some sulfur dioxide to meet the non-detection limit of chlorine just before it is discharged.”

 

Change in Plans 

In the past, the facility’s primary sludge and the waste activated sludge from the aeration basins was pumped into a digester, then through a belt press for dewatering and deposited onto trucks that would take it for land application on several pieces of permitted property.

“However, in 2014, land ownership changed on one of those parcels and the new owners no longer wanted sludge on their land. So, we lost that piece of property, which was a substantial loss in available area, and were restricted solely to the parcel we owned. At that time, we were generating about 2400 lbs. per day of the Class B biosolids. Ordinarily, we might have been able to make that work, but, at the time, we had just added another aeration basin and clarifier to the front end of the process, so we knew we were going to be generating more solids. Something had to be done.”

Schwing Bioset Class A Biosolids Process 

Seeking Alternatives

Faced with that situation, the facility conducted an intensive study to look at the options available to them. Those included: increasing the digester volumes or improving the existing ones, composting, and the use of sludge dryers.

“What turned us off to drying the sludge was the significant initial investment,” said Bradley. “And, as I talked to people at other facilities, I discovered that there is a fairly high cost for maintenance on that equipment — that’s a one-two punch we didn’t need. And when we went to a northwest Arkansas composting facility, we found that solution to be very labor-intensive and it would demand much more acreage than we had available. Couple that with the fact that we weren’t certain we could ensure a reliable availability of the organic material needed for the process and it was no longer a serious choice. We needed another viable option and learned about it almost in our backyard.”

 

A Good Tip

At about that same time, the Russellville facility was encountering issues preventing them from maintaining the necessary retention time in their digester to meet Class B specifications, forcing them to truck their biosolids to a nearby landfill. It was a situation that ran counter to everything Bradley and his team stood for.

“We absolutely hate to have to send anything to landfill, and not just because of the costs involved in doing so — though those costs are substantial,” he said. “Landfills have space issues of their own and this is material that can ultimately serve a better benefit. But yet, we were at a point where we had no choice, so we contracted with Denali Water Solutions (Russellville, Ark.) to haul off our sludge. It just so happened that they’d been working on some potential projects with Tom Welch, a regional manager from Schwing Bioset, Inc. and told us about the Schwing Bioset process for creating a Class A biosolid.  After contacting SBI, we were intrigued enough that I, along with Lance Bartlett our utility engineer, and Chesley Jackson my senior operator, took a trip to St. Petersburg, Florida to look at their process in operation and saw the possibilities it held for us.”

In the context of what PCWF’s current solution looks like, the Schwing Bioset process to which Bradley refers, starts by taking biosolids that have been dewatered in a BDP 1.5-meter Model 3DP three-belt press and gravity thickener (at PCWF, dewatered to about 18% dry solids) and dropping them into a hopper with a twin-screw mixer in which quicklime and sulfamic acid are added and blended. The mixing effort helps alleviate issues such as unreacted lime in the final product — and the costs associated with it. A Schwing KSP-25 piston pump then sends the blended material into the 35 ft. long reactor where temps in the 140° F range from the acid/quicklime mixture raise the pH level, stabilize the biosolids mixture, and produce the Class A product PCWF needs.

Schwing Bioset Pump and Reactor 

Built for Expansion 

Getting to the point where the Schwing Bioset process was fully theirs and fully online, was something of a departure for all parties involved. According to SBI’s Tom Welch, in a deal that involved the plant’s owners, SBI and Denali Water Solutions, a mobile Bioset system was brought to Russellville to initiate a pilot program in order to prove out the process there.

“The final agreement involved us leasing our mobile Bioset system to Denali which they, in turn, operated for the facility, disposing of the material at an onsite dirt yard. Denali charged City Corporation, the owners and operators of the PCWF, a monthly fee to cover the labor, operation, and lease of the Bioset equipment. However, after the final equipment was purchased and the installation was nearing completion, facility management determined that they had the comfort level to operate the system and manage the disposal of the product themselves. That made good sense since bringing that process in-house would save them a large operating cost.”

Bradley added that the installation process itself was relatively quick and efficient. “Largely due to the help SBI provided — technicians spent the first two weeks with us — the install was very smooth,” he said. “During the design phase, we gave Ft. Smith-based Hawkins-Weir Engineering a projection for where we might be in 10-20 years and they designed the facility for future area development. As a result, the Bioset reactor is sized to handle two belt presses, so, if growth warrants it, we can just move another belt press in without skipping a beat.”

 

Great for the Soil

PCWF went online with the new system in 2016 and has been processing, on average, 81,000 lbs. of Class A biosolids per month since. Once the material exits the Bioset process, it is loaded onto dual axle dump trucks and taken out to an area adjacent to the plant, spread out using a front-end loader and allowed to dry. Once dry, it is moved into piles and — after periodic testing for salmonella — given away to area farmers. 

“We have several farmers competing for it at times, which is great for us,” said Bradley. “While the material has some nutrient value, its ability to boost the pH of soil is its real selling point. Almost all the soil in Arkansas is pretty acidic, so it welcomes that pH boost.

Next spring we are looking at possibly doing some type of bid for it. Simply recouping some of our costs — even enough to pay for fuel for the loader, for example — would be a nice bonus. But right now just having someone haul it off for us and make good use of it a huge improvement over what we did in the past. This entire project could not have gone better nor had better results.”

 

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Tags: Bioset Process, Beneficial Reuse, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Lime Stabilization