News from Schwing Bioset

New Pair of Piston Pumps for Big Island Mine

 

Written by Dale Bone, August 12, 2015

 

OCI Chemical Corporation is an industry leader in the production of soda ash, sodium percarbonate, and hydrogen peroxide. OCI’s Big Island Mine has been in operation since 1962 and is a 3.25 million short ton facility. The trona mine uses the “Room and Pillar Method,” and then they convey it to surface where it is refined into dense soda ash. The waste material is pumped back underground as far as two miles.  The tailings range from 50-63% solids. Soda ash is commonly used in glass manufacturing and powder detergent. Other uses include pulp processing, chemicals manufacturing, pH control, and food manufacturing.

OCI needed to replace aging piston pumps at its Big Island Mine near Green River, WY, and they chose to install Schwing Bioset equipment to pump their tailings underground or to surface storage facilities - on a 24/7 basis.  Because of this continuous demand, OCI spent a great deal of time and research in choosing a product and partner, and during this process they visited Schwing Bioset operations, among others. In the end, several factors drove the decision to choose Schwing Bioset piston pumps, and OCI will install two model KSP 220 pumps with XL poppet valves this fall.

According to OCI Project Manager, Mr. Jim Spurrier, the most compelling factors included Schwing Bioset’s resume of satisfied mining clients, their ability to customize programming and electrical design to integrate into OCI’s existing controls and computers, and the open loop hydraulics and hydraulic signaling incorporated in the product design.  The other important factor was that Schwing Bioset is based out of Wisconsin. The pumps and power units were built in Somerset, WI, so schematics were written in English, and the ability to get parts stocked in North America and shipped within one business day was critical, as well as having service techs in the US.

The information exchange and interaction the OCI team had with the Schwing Bioset team throughout the year-long process gave OCI the confidence that they chose the right partner for them and that they could make the project a success regardless of the challenges they face along the way.

To learn more about this project, contact this blog’s author, Dale Bone, at dbone@schwingbioset.com. For other information, call 715.247.3433, visit our website, or follow us on social media.

 

 Pump_Photo

(Equipment shown is not the actual OCI equipment)

 

Tags: Piston Pumps, Poppet Valves, Pumps, Mining, Mining Pumps, Tailings

Schwing Bioset is Exhibiting at Several Trade Shows in May

 

Posted on Apr 30, 2015 9:33:00 AM

The Schwing Bioset Teams will be traveling nationally and internationally to exhibit at five trade shows during the month of May. 

To learn more about Schwing Bioset pumps (municipal or mining), fluid bed dryers, screw presses, sliding frames, the bioset process, and more, please be sure to find us on the exhibit floor at any of these upcoming shows:

 

California Water Environment Association (CWEA), April 28 - May 1 in San Diego, CA

http://myac15.com/

Florida Water Resources Conference (FWRC), May 3 - 5 in Orlando, FL

http://fwrc.org/

Canadian Institute of Mining (CIM), May 9 - 11 in Montreal, Canada

http://www.miningandexploration.ca/events/article/cim_2015_convention/

Exponor Chile 2015, May 11 - 15 in Antofagasta, Chile

http://www.exponor.cl/en/

Central States Water Environment Association (CSWEA), May 18 - 20 in Oakbrook Terrace, IL

http://www.cswea.org/events/

 

If you'd like to meet with one of our team members, please contact marketing@schwingbioset.com for the name of the contact(s) who is attending the show.

We look forward to seeing you!

Bioset_Process_ImagePump-Yellow

 

Tags: Announcements, Bioset Process, Events, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Schwing Bioset, Mining Pumps, Municipal Pumps

Schwing Bioset adds Synergy Controls as Mining Rep in Ontario and Manitoba

 

January 12, 2015 (Somerset, WI) 

Schwing Bioset, Inc. is pleased to announce that Synergy Controls Corporation (Sudbury, ON) has signed on as their Mining Representative in Ontario and Manitoba. Schwing Bioset is a worldwide leader in thick product pumping and material handling solutions. “Synergy Controls’ extensive knowledge of mining processes and excellent reputation in the market in serving their customer base make them a great choice as a partner,” explains Scott Springer, Schwing Bioset’s Vice President Sales & Marketing.  “They have a great presence both at the mines and with the Engineering contractors”.

Mike Gribbons (President of Synergy Controls Corporation) stated, “Schwing Bioset was our first choice for a high pressure slurry pump.  Schwing impressed us with both their experience and technology.   Coupling that with, North American made systems and a large inventory of completed pumps and spares fully complements our paste and back fill solutions. This allows our clients a “one stop shop” providing pumps, valves, instruments and control solutions.”

Miguel Jahncke (Schwing Bioset Director of Mining Solutions) is excited about this key partnership. “The Synergy Controls organization’s history of providing mining clients with engineered solutions supports Schwing Bioset’s mission of providing the best high solids content slurries transportation and handling solutions in the mining industry. Their efforts at the Ontario EPCM’s will help Schwing Bioset’s mining business globally.”

SBI Synergy Combined Logos sm 

www.synergycontrols.com                                    www.schwingbioset.com

Tags: Piston Pumps, Schwing Bioset, Pumps, Hydraulic Pumps, Mining Pumps, Slurry Pumps, Paste Backfilling, Mining Paste

Schwing Bioset, Inc. Continues to Expand its Team of Representatives

 

Posted on September 5, 2014

Schwing Bioset, Inc. is pleased to announce that Corix Control Solutions LP (formerly BG Controls,Port Coquitlam, BC) has signed on as their Mining Representative in British Columbia and Yukon. Schwing Bioset is a worldwide leader in thick material pumping and material handling. “Corix Control Solutions’ team greatly enhances our presence in the key mining market of B.C., both at the mines and with the global EPCM’s. They are proven, professional solution providers,” explains Scott Springer, Schwing Bioset’s Vice President Sales & Marketing.

Schwing Bioset Signs Corix 1

Dom Sacco (General Manager of Corix Control Solutions) stated, “Schwing Bioset is a great complement to our line of industrial products and solutions. This allows my sales team to provide even more value to our customers.”Miguel Jahncke (Schwing Bioset Director of Mining Solutions) is excited about this key partnership. “From the first time we met the Corix team, it was obvious that they could help Schwing Bioset’s mission of providing the best thick product pumping solutions in the mining industry. Their efforts at the Vancouver EPCM’s will help Schwing Bioset’s mining business globally.”

Tags: Announcements, Mining, Mining Pumps, Material Handling

Schwing Bioset Featured in E&MJ Engineering and Mining Journal

Paste: A Maturing Technology

Pump Supports Backfill Operation at Mexican Mine

engineering and mining journal

Paste backfilling, the process by which a combination of tailings, water and cementacious materials are blended and used to fill voids in underground mining operations, provides a broad range of benefits. These can include an improvement in safety, the ability to make subsequent surface development possible, a reasonable solution to the ever-present problem of what to do with tailings, and more. It’s not surprising, then, that Canadian miner Agnico-Eagle chose paste backfilling as the key tailings disposal method for one of its newest developments, the Chihuahua, Mexico-based Pinos Altos mine. But while creating the paste is one issue, getting it to the mine stopes—which in this case can be anywhere from 1.5 to 2 km away—is another one entirely. To make that happen, Agnico-Eagle turned to a pump model from Schwing Bioset (Somerset, Wisconsin, USA), and is reporting impressive performance delivering material in this around-the-clock operation.

Back into the Ground
Located in the Sierra Madre gold belt, 140 miles (225 km) west of the capital of Chihuahua state, Pinos Altos contains reserves of more than 3.5 million oz of gold and 100 million oz of silver. Operational as a surface pit since 2008—with underground mining started in 2010—the 27,180-acre (110-km2) site is expected to generate yearly outputs of 170,000 oz of gold and 2.5 million oz of silver through the year 2028. The end result of that gold milling operation is a steady stream of tailings—a volume which is currently about 2,500 t/d but could easily be doubled with an increase in production. According to Moises Palma, engineer in charge of the site’s paste plant, paste backfilling was always the method of choice for tailings disposal at Pinos Altos.

“The tailings operation was designed with this procedure in mind,” said Palma. “Currently, we take waste material by conveyor from the milling plant, and run it up an inclined belt into a batch plant. There, the tailings make their way through a process in which they are combined with cement and water to create a paste. The cement—roughly 5% of the overall mixture—is added to make the paste suitable for filling and supporting the existing underground cavities that have already been mined.  Once the correct mixture is achieved, it is dropped down into the hopper for the paste pump and ready for delivery back to the mine.”

Mine backfilling is hardly a new concept. What has changed over the years, however, is the characteristic of the backfill material itself. In the past, to accommodate the limited pumping technology available in most mines, tailings had to be turned into a slurry with a water content of 70% or more. By comparison, the paste material generated at Pinos Altos is stout, with a water content of roughly 30% and a slump generally in the 8-in. (203-mm) range.

Technology Changes the Game
The difference between what could once be pumped and what can be moved today has been mining companies’ preference for piston pumps over centrifugal pumps in tailings operations. Where other previous technology offered limited pumping pressure (often as low as 10 bar), the Schwing KSP 140 H(HD)XL pump in place at Pinos Altos provides a maximum conveying pressure of 130 bar with paste outputs up to 85 m3/hr—ideal, according to Palma, for moving the high-solids material long distances.

The Schwing pump we use here at Pinos Altos is perfect for what we do,” he said. “This is a challenging application, given the thickness of the paste, the distance it has to be pumped—currently about 1.5 km—and the pump’s almost continuous operation. Yet, we are getting a steady rate of about 126 tons of material pumped every hour—roughly 2,500 tons per day. We have been extremely pleased with that kind of performance.”

Based on the nature of the paste and the desired production rates, engineers from Schwing-Bioset recommended its XL pump option for the Pinos Altos operation. Poppets in the XL series are designed to reduce material velocity through the poppet housing.  Doing so minimizes the pressure drop through the valve housing, increases the filling efficiency of the pumping cylinders and reduces wear on the poppet discs, seats and pumping rams—all of which lead to better performance and less downtime.

To keep the pump running and the paste flowing, Pinos Altos relies on an air-cooled Model PP2400 drive unit that is powered by twin 400-hp (300-kW) motors, also supplied by Schwing Bioset. This is mounted adjacent to the pump at the base of the paste plant, and includes PLC-based controls. While the initial plan was for the pump to operate up to 10 strokes per minute and deliver 126 t/h, operations are running so smoothly that mine officials are looking to raise production another 20%.

Safety Leads the Way
As mentioned above, the decision to use a paste backfill is generally based upon the benefits that the technique provides. At Pinos Altos, it enhanced overall mine safety by providing mining crews with dramatically improved structural stability within the stope. Palma says their operating procedure for that facet of the job is far more than simply pouring mud into a hole.

“We are pumping into three main stopes and doing so in three-foot lifts with three days between pours,” he said. “Not only does that allow enough time for the paste mixture to harden, it also avoids placing the massive stress load on that cell and adjacent areas that would be present if we filled it all. This first cell alone will be taking on more than 13,000 tons of material, which is over 8,300 m3 of paste.”

To put that figure into context, 8,300 m3 ( 10,855 yd3) is enough material to bury an entire basketball court over 13 ft (4 m) deep.

Though the other two stopes currently being filled are smaller—one will hold 7,100 tons and the other 6,600 tons—they still represent a sizable movement of material from the paste plant to the mine.  Discharge into the cells is monitored via closed-circuit camera to ensure the process runs smoothly and any problems can be quickly spotted.

Looking Ahead
In addition to making the mining effort safer, paste backfilling at Pinos Altos is also addressing a number of other concerns that have plagued similar mining operations for decades. Most notable of these is the issue of how to best dispose of tailings from the cyanide-based gold recovery operation. Traditional approaches such as surface storage, while initially less expensive, can bring unwelcome environmental impacts. Paste backfilling not only solves those concerns, it does so in a manner that eliminates the mine dewatering necessary with other disposal efforts.

“This has been a very successful approach to tailings disposal for us,” said Palma. “As a result of what we do here, the mining operation is safer, there is almost no impact on the environment and, over time, it is actually a lower cost alternative to other methods. Agnico-Eagle has already started talks to boost production by almost twice what we are doing now. When that happens, we will add another pump from Schwing Bioset which will allow us to handle between 5,000 and 6,000 tons per day. We know they will be up to the task and we are excited for what lies ahead.”

Tags: Piston Pumps, Mining Pumps, Paste Backfilling, Mining Paste

Schwing Bioset Featured in Mining Magazine

Keeping the deeps dry

Carly Lovejoy explores the types and configurations of dewatering pumps used in underground mines, as well as current industry trends

Every underground mine has to deal with some degree of water ingress, and will require dewatering at one time or another during its lifecycle. How that dewatering is achieved, and the scale of the operations is largely dependent upon the mining method and design used, the depth of the mine, its location, the geology of the host rock and the type of ore being mined.

The geology of the host rock is a critical factor affecting the amount of water that needs to be removed. The porosity of the rock will determine the ability of groundwater and throughflow from natural sources such as precipitation to travel through certain layers of strata. Fractures, voids and veins can also act as conduits for water as it filters through the rock. Due to gravity, water will naturally follow through these channels, run down cave and tunnel walls and accumulate in depressions, whether natural or made-made.

Gavin Doran, general manager of sales at Sulzer Pumps (South Africa), says: “Open-pit mining sees the ingress of direct rainfall water, as well as overland or storm water flows into the operation, while underground mines see water ingress via rainfall down shafts and adits, as well as seepage of rainfall and overland flow from crack zones in geological structures, and water from pressurised aquifers that have been around for thousands of years.”

Mining in the proximity of large surface bodies of water or near coastal areas is also a concern and can lead to much greater degrees of flooding.

In addition to natural sources, water is also used at many stages in the mining process, for example, to flush cuttings from drill holes during development or production activities, and to suppress dust. This can add to the problem of naturally occurring water.

Miguel Jahncke, director of mining at Schwing Bioset, says: “Hard-rock underground mines generally have to deal with two main water sources: water that is present in the surrounding ground and enters the operation through troughs, voids, cavities, and drill holes; and water that is introduced through the mining process, through drilling, and face and muck pile hosing to suppress dust (silicosis prevention is the number one reason for keeping dust down underground).

“To prevent mining into unknown underground water bodies and ‘rivers’, development longholes are typically drilled ahead of the development headings and new mining areas to identify and eliminate, where possible, potential risks. All of the water in the mine is then collected and channelled to the lowest point through a series of channels or ditches.”

As water travels through the mine, it collects the fine particles of the rock (sometimes called fines or slimes) generated by the mining process. Downward dipping sections and working areas will collect additional water that can be pumped utilising small electric or pneumatic diaphragm pumps, or small submersible pumps. This water is pumped either to the mine dewatering channels or to one of the mine sumps. As the water reaches the lowest point of a mine, a series of settling ponds are typically used to settle the slimes, and supply cleaner water to the main sump where the main dewatering pumps are situated. These pump the water up to intermediate stages or directly up to the surface.

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  mining pumps
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Tags: Piston Pumps, Mining, Mining Pumps, Slurry Pumps