News from Schwing Bioset

Lime Stabilization-Fact vs. Fiction(myth-busted)


As you can imagine, working with sludges and biosolids brings up a number of concerns, from the basic to the technical. At the very basic, there’s “does it have an awful smell?” It’s a natural enough concern—we’re working with human waste, after all. But is there a terrible smell?

Class A Biosolids
Not at all, thanks to the Schwing Bioset process. A pinch valve flattens the sludge flowing out of the reactor, creating additional surface area to allow the ammonia and other compounds to be released and subsequently captured and scrubbed under the collection hood. The smell, overall, is akin to wet concrete (because of the lime content). In fact, in many instances the Class AA product produced by the Schwing Bioset process is stored outdoors on the edge of town with residential homes within sight.
At the more technical end, other lime stabilization systems are plagued by poorly mixed lime and sludge. Schwing Bioset solves this with a twin auger mixer that ensures the lime and sludge are thoroughly combined.
Another common concern is that the lime/sludge dust will make for a tough work environment. But the Schwing Bioset process is a closed system with a sealed mixing hopper—and that ensures the dust stays inside the machine, and not your lungs.

 CONTACT A BIOSET ENGINEER TODAY

Tags: Biosolids Process, Bioset Process, Bioset Class A, Fertilizer Replacement, Biosolids Handling