News from Schwing Bioset

Big Changes at Pine Creek Wastewater Treatment Facility

 

Written by Larry Trojak, Trojak Communications

Version also published in TPO Magazine, February 2020

 

Alabama facility sets lofty goals for its upgrade; meets or exceeds them all.

When the City of Prattville, Alabama, recently chose to upgrade its Pine Creek wastewater treatment facility, it spared no effort in doing so. While they had made smaller, incremental modifications in the past, this time around they took the plant from simply adequate to boldly forward-thinking, designing it to be viable and effective for at least the next quarter century. Included in the wholesale changes was a rethinking of its solids handling capability which, up to that point, was both basic and costly. Today, the Pine Creek Clean Water Facility uses a new approach to aeration, dewaters through a pair of new screw presses, is generating a Class A biosolids for area land application, and is now accepting sludge from a nearby sister facility. In this case, being up a creek is definitely a good thing.

 

Dealing with Growth

Located 20 minutes northwest of Montgomery, Prattville is a city of 34,000 which has seen some impressive development of late. According to the local Chamber of Commerce, between 2014 and 2018 alone, more than 130 new businesses have opened in Prattville and immediate surrounding areas — a total of $760 million in capital investment. All that growth prompted city officials to look at existing infrastructure demands and determine that upgrades to their wastewater treatment effort were in order.

“This was a wholesale overhaul of the entire treatment process to help deal with the growth in the area,” said Greg
Thompson, project engineer with Engineers of the South. “We are a consulting engineering company and have been working with the City for more than 15 years now. So, we were actively involved in the research and planning leading to the upgrade. The original plant, built in 1979 as part of the Clean Water Act, had a 3 mgd capacity. In addition to options for dealing with the anticipated increases in volume, we talked with city officials about re-thinking the entire biosolids treatment and disposal process.”

 

Alabama Dream Sheet

Though a plant-wide change was in the cards, the evaluation criteria for that change were very ordered and specific. According to Dale Gandy, Prattville’s Director of Public Works, the desire to use state of the art technology headed up the list of desirables. 

“Obviously, we wanted to tap into the strengths of today’s newer technology,” he said. “However, we also wanted to try to utilize ‘green’ infrastructure within the plant; had our sights set on looking into a Class A biosolid; wanted to create an effluent that was cleaner than the environment into which it was headed; wanted the whole effort to be energy efficient; and needed the plant to gain an additional 25-30 years of viability. In addition, because we didn’t have unlimited funds to throw at the project, we had to be relatively cost conscious in our efforts. It was a long list to try to meet but we set out confident that it could get done.”

The new plant design that Thompson and his engineering team — working hand in hand with Gandy and Prattville’s
plant management — envisioned, would take the facility from 3.0 to 5.7 mgd — almost doubling in volume. That
increase in capacity, they felt, would give them the 25-30 year life expectancy they needed.

 

Schwing Bioset Screw Presses  Schwing Bioset - Bioset Process Reactor

 

Outdated Concepts

To get to that point, there was not one area of the Pine Creek facility that would be left untouched by the overhaul. Designed in the late 1970s as a conventional activated sludge facility, the plant utilized a coarse screen in a deep sump, prior to the raw sewage pump station, followed by aerated grit removal.

“Aeration in the original design consisted of three parallel basins with two fixed-mounted, low speed surface aerators per basin,” said Thompson. “Control of the aeration system consisted only of locally-mounted low/high-speed selector switches. Not only was the process energy-inefficient, the inability to aerate sufficiently or deal with varying flow rates and oxygen demands led to plant upsets and periodic effluent violations. The warm summer months, when effluent limits are lowest, made it particularly hard for operators to maintain compliance.”

At that time, once biosolids met Class B requirements, they were hauled off to a local field — with 100% of the liquid
— for land application. The facility averaged 10-15 tanker loads of the wet material per day. “But if it had rained and the field was wet, they couldn’t land-apply, so the plant had to be prepared to store material in the digesters,” added Thompson. “It’s not surprising they knew a change was needed.” Finally, the previous clarifiers utilized a mix of organ pipe and scraper blade solids-removal systems. Disinfection, which originally used gaseous chlorine, was updated to UV in a 1999 plant modification.

 

In With the New

Thompson and his group worked hard, not only to address all the issues with the existing design, but also to ensure
the plant’s viability for decades to come. In aeration, to deal with the high ammonia numbers caused by an inability to nitrify, they opted for a VertiCel solution (Evoqua Water Technologies, Pittsburgh, Pa.).

“VertiCel uses a combination of disk aeration followed by fine bubble diffused air,” said Thompson. “In that way, we
felt we could tap the efficiencies of both types of aeration to meet our need for an energy-efficient design and to get full biological nutrient removal.”

Conversely, changes to the plant’s digestion phase included taking them from using surface mechanical aeration to
diffused aeration. “Prattville always had issues getting enough oxygen transfer with the old system,” said Thompson. “This combination of disc aerators and fine bubble diffusers powered by Howden blowers (PD Blowers, Inc, Gainesville, Ga.) is both energy efficient and has great oxygen transfer.” Also covered in the expansion’s design were an all-new headworks, two new fine screens (Duperon, Saginaw, Mich.), and grit removal which incorporated Eutek HeadCell technology and WEMCO Hydrogritters.

 

Road Trip

With preliminary design considerations in place, representatives from both the City and Engineers of the
South, visited a number of wastewater treatment plants throughout the southeast U.S. to review various approaches
to dealing with biosolids. One of the things driving the city’s decision to create a Class A biosolid product was, again, growth in the area.

“We were seeing new industries coming in regularly and knew that we could soon be running out of industrial fields
like the one on which we’d been applying,” said Sam Russell, Pine Creek’s former plant manager who was brought on as a consultant during the upgrade. “So, we knew solids handling had to change and that dewatering would be a huge part of that discussion."

Evaluations of available dewatering options included visits to a half dozen facilities to view belt presses, screw presses and centrifuges, and conversations with operators about their experiences with each. With that growing volume of information at hand, the group started seeing the screw press as the best fit for Prattville, and a visit to a plant in Immokalee, Fla. confirmed that for them.

“Immokalee was an eye-opener for us,” said Thompson. “That installation utilizes a Schwing Bioset screw press
(Schwing Bioset, Somerset, Wisc.) for dewatering and creates a Class A product using the Bioset solution. We saw
so many similarities between what Immokalee had dealt with and our own situation at Prattville that we all felt we’d found our answer. ”

 

Pressing Issue

Coming online in August 2019, the biosolids treatment at Pine Creek now begins by taking material from WAS storage basins — where sludge is held, mixed and aerated — and fed to a pair of new Model FSP-1002 screw presses for dewatering. Each of Pine Creek’s screw presses is rated for 1,122 lbs. of dry solids per hour, with a minimum cake dryness of 17% and a 95% minimum system solids capture. With “tweaks” still being made to the process as operations stabilize, the facility is currently getting cake discharged up to 18%. While the performance stats proved key in making their decision, Prattville was also drawn by the self-cleaning function the Schwing Bioset screw press offered, where the units continue to dewater whenever a cleaning cycle is performed. This continuous operation ensures no equalization storage is necessary between dewatering and the Class A operations.

“We have each unit scheduled to clean itself every hour, but that function is flexible and easily changed,” said Napoleon Wilks, Pine Creek’s current plant manager. “We also like the fact that these presses are almost self-operating,” he said. “We have them programmed to run for only seven hours a day, five days a week, which allows us to keep staffing costs down.”

 

A Stabilizing Presence

In addition to being a sound decision for the City, the fact that both Sam Russell and Dale Gandy own and operate
farms helped solidify Prattville’s decision to go with a Class A product. Their understanding of the benefits a soil
amendment product can bring, the ways it can be used and how positive it could be to the community, led to that
decision.

“We like what can be done with a good Class A product — whether it’s a resident needing it for flower beds, for grass in front of City Hall, or a farmer using it on crops. And, after seeing the success Immokalee was having, it made sense to go with the Bioset solution,” said Russell. “We also felt that there was a real up-side in accountability
to sourcing both the dewatering and the Class A process from the same company.”

The Bioset process uses a screw conveyor to take Pine Creek’s untreated biosolids from the screw presses to
a twin-screw mixer where quicklime and sulfamic acid are added and mixed. From the mixer, a Schwing Bioset
KSP-25VKL pumps material through a 22 ft. long reactor. There, the chemical reactions raise the temperature and
the pH level, stabilizing the mixture and creating a product that meets EPA Class A requirements.

According to Wilks, they are maintaining a minimum temperature of 131°F (55°C) in the reactor with a retention time of 40 minutes in accordance with the operating conditions approved by the Unites States Environmental Protection  Agency (USEPA) through the Process to Further Reduce Pathogens (PFRP) in the 503 regulations. “The way we process our biosolids today — pushing a lower quantity through there than our future design conditions — material is actually in the reactor far longer than that,” he said. “The results have been a consistently good Class A biosolid that we take to a field owned by the department, dump it, spread it a bit, and turn it for a few days until it dries to a point that we are able to pass it along to a local farmer — and right now he will take all that we can provide.”

 

Schwing Bioset Municipal Piston Pump  Schwing Bioset Truck Loading

 

No Mistake About It

In the past, a continual stream of trucks, each carrying roughly 6,800 gallons of liquid headed to the field to
land-apply as much as 81,600 gallons of liquid waste per day. Today’s disposal effort involves just two tri-axle
trucks loaded ¾ full per week. And that energy efficiency criteria? It’s been met to a degree they never imagined,
according to Gandy.

“This is amazing to even comprehend but, despite almost doubling the size of the plant in terms of capacity, when we ran the numbers we found that our energy consumption had only increased by 8%,” he said. “Thinking I must have missed something I checked the data several times and even had a representative from Alabama Power verify
it for me. There was no mistake — that’s how energy efficient this plant is.”

The new biosolids effort is working so well that Pine Creek CWF has already begun processing material from
its sister plant, the 4 mgd Autauga Creek CWF. To do that, the City hauls approximately 200,000 gallons of wet
sludge (at 1.75% concentration ) per month from Autauga Creek to Pine Creek for processing.

Said Gandy: “We set out with a pretty challenging to-do list. But tapping the innovative technology available to us,
we feel we accomplished it all — and then some.”

Click here to read more about our Products, then contact us to learn more about this project or find out how we can help your plant too.

 

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Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Wastewater Treatment, Municipal Pumps, Screw Press

Southerly Sets The Standard with Sludge Disposal Efforts

 

Schwing Bioset Application Report 14, Columbus, Ohio

Written by Larry Trojak, Trojak Communications

Version also published in WE&T Magazine (click to view)

 

Pumps and sliding frames allow options for effective disposal of cake from Columbus, Ohio, operation.

Wastewater treatment plants can distinguish themselves in any number of ways: by the volumes they can handle, by the number of industry awards they have earned, by the manner in which they handle an interruption in “business-as-usual”, and so on. They can also do so by demonstrating a creative, effective and successful effort to use or dispose of the biosolids they generate. Given those criteria alone, the Southerly Wastewater Treatment Plant could likely be seen as one of the premier WWTPs in operation today. Just coming off a five-year, $350 million expansion which nearly tripled its peak capacity from 114 mgd to about 330 mgd (built-in contingencies for further expansion can take the plant as high as 550 mgd), the plant services the majority of the greater Columbus area. State-of-the-art in every regard, Southerly is poised to build upon an already impressive reputation that has won them numerous National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA) awards for plant and employee performance.

Columbus_Southerly_1.jpg

But it is also its innovative sludge disposal program that separates Southerly from super-plant wannabes. Using a quartet of heavy-duty pumps and a number of sliding frame components (all from Schwing Bioset, Inc. [SBI] Somerset, WI) cake can either be routed directly for incineration or sent to a pair of storage silos. Once in the silos, the material is readily available for truck-loading and transport, either to an already-successful composting operation run by the department or directly to the landfill.  Options, it seems, are the hallmark of this successful operation. 

Change They Can Use

Built in 1967, the Southerly WWTP is one of two plants serving the Columbus metropolitan area (the other being the nearby Jackson Pike WWTP). The current plant expansion which so dramatically increased overall capacity, also increased volumes in the solids handling area. New centrifuges, installed a number of years in advance of that expansion, handle that increase nicely, according to Jeff Hall, Assistant Plant Manager.

“That upgrade was implemented both to replace aging equipment, as in the case of the centrifuges, and to add functionality to other areas like the transportation of solids,” he says. In the past, primary solids were gravity thickened while older centrifuges thickened the waste activated sludge (WAS). The new units now thicken both the primary solids and the WAS. This new approach boosts the solids content of the resulting dewatered cake to about 20-25%, a nice improvement over the 17-21% solids content with the older system.”

Additional changes brought about in that initial upgrade included installation of new cake pumps, a pair of storage silos, and sliding frames at two points in the solids handling process. 

Columbus_Southerly_3.jpg

The Route To Disposal

Getting cake to the point where disposal options are available is a function of Southerly’s pumps and silos. As material exits the centrifuges, it is routed to any of four Schwing KSP 45V(HD)L-SFMS pumps which direct it to the appropriate area. Where that is, varies greatly according to need.

“Even though incineration is the most efficient method of disposal, we still try to keep the compost operation fed with as much as it needs, since that is the better use of the product,” says Carmon “Skip” Allen, Solids Supervisor 2. “Obviously that can vary from day to day. The balance of the material—we can do anywhere from 5.5 tons up to 9 tons an hour—is then sent for incineration. But we know at all times what is going to the silos for storage and what’s getting burned.”

The sludge pumps at Southerly are designed to generate a force sufficient to move cake the long distances needed for either incineration or storage. He says it is easily 300 feet to the multi-hearth incinerators (which have operating temps of 1400°F), and about 400 feet to the storage silos. Equipped with Schwing Bioset’s Sludge Flow Measuring System, the pumps are able to measure to within +/-5% the amount of sludge that is pumped to the incinerator. This simplifies their USEPA reporting requirements for their incinerator operations.

“Material headed to the silos, however, has an additional challenge to overcome,” says Allen. “Once there, the cake has to go straight up another 100 feet to enter the top of the structures, so the force needed to do that is really pretty impressive. I don’t think any regular equipment would be up to a task like that; these are definitely the right pumps for the job.”

Giving it the Slip

Despite maximum operating pressures of 1,100 psi for each pump, those extended distances at Southerly prompted Schwing Bioset to make accommodations to help move the sludge along. To do so, they added a “slip ring,” or pipeline lubrication system. Schwing Bioset’s unique design includes a 360 degree annular groove that evenly injects a thin film of water around the entire annulus of the pipe that separates viscous and sticky materials from the inner wall of the pipeline. The end result is a reduction in friction loss in the pipeline, and lower—in some cases better than 50% less—pipeline operating pressures.

Additional benefits include a savings in energy by reducing the demand on each pump and hydraulic unit, and, because of the reduction in pipeline friction, an increase in wear part life. While other systems try to address the friction issue through the use of as many as four drilled ports which inject more fluid, this offsets a percentage of the gains made by the centrifuges. Still other designs mix polymer with the water to help reduce pressure which, while effective, adds both up-front and perpetual costs to the operation.

Tom Thomas, Maintenance Supervisor 2 at Southerly, says the reduction in friction has also shown benefits in wear part life for the pumps—a fact that is borne out in similar results at Jackson Pike. “We run these pumps round the clock and, even with that 24/7 operation, parts such as the pumping rams, poppet valve discs and seats are getting six months of wear. That’s about 4,000 hours of wear part life, which is outstanding given what they’re being asked to pump.”

Silo Efficiency

As mentioned, the SBI sliding frame silos offer a storage option for cake headed either to the landfill for disposal or to the compost site. Prior to their installation, Southerly relied upon a smaller holding vessel known as “the pit,” a belt-fed, hopper-equipped component that used a series of screws to feed a truck sitting under the discharge chute. City officials say the new silos are larger (providing about 75% more capacity) as well as far more efficient, thereby reducing truck loading times from 45 minutes with “the pit,” down to only five minutes. This was an important criterion when selecting equipment.

Because the City pays a contractor to haul the biosolids, reducing loading times lowers overall hauling costs—the trucks now spend more time hauling and less time waiting to be loaded. The net result is more trucks loaded per day (and a lower cost to do so.) In addition, because of that added storage capability, the composting operation now has the option of drawing material solely from Jackson Pike, if necessary. "Anytime you can reuse something rather than just burying it or burning it, you are making a positive impact," says Assistant Plant Manager Jeff Hall.

“Today, we are reusing about one-third of the solids we handle through the composting operation,” says Hall. “That’s obviously good from an economic standpoint, since we are generating revenue from a product that was once simply discarded. However, it is also a plus from an environmental perspective."

The concept of the sliding frame silo is simple, yet very effective. Hydraulic cylinders move an elliptical frame across the silo floor. The frame’s action not only breaks any bridging that can occur over the extraction screw, it also pushes and pulls material towards the silo extraction screws for discharge into trucks.

Allen says the sliding frame silos were a nice addition to the operation. “Each silo holds better than 1,500 tons of cake, so even if one of the incinerators went down and there was an interruption in the trucking operation, we’d still have a nice short-term storage option while things get back up again. It’s really all about flexibility and these silos afford us that.”

Due to the sheer size of the silos, they are each equipped with three extraction screw conveyors at the bottom which allows the trailers to be evenly loaded without having to be jockeyed back and forth.

The silos also include an odor and splash control shroud that pulls fumes directly off the trailer, thereby minimizing the need for odor control in the truck loading building. In addition, it helps reduce the chance of material splatter during load-out, and confines any such instances to the area immediately adjacent to the trailer, which makes periodic cleanup of the area much easier.

Allen adds that they also use SBI sliding frames on hoppers in advance of the pumps which feed the incinerator. Doing so provides a wide spot in the process line enabling them to maintain steady incinerator operations for several hours in the event of any upset condition with the centrifuges.

Sibling Growth

Southerly WWTP’s growth is being mirrored in the expansion of its sister plant, Jackson Pike WWTP, located a mere seven miles from Southerly’s facility. That plant also installed SBI equipment for similar end uses, but because its capacities are less, scaled down the size of that equipment. So today, Jackson Pike uses a quartet of KSP 25 V(HD)L pumps, rather than the 45s in use at Southerly and powers them with a 100hp power pack compared to its 150hp counterpart. The silos, though smaller in height, are of the same design and offer the same performance benefits as Southerly’s. Once the expansion at Jackson Pike is complete, the two plants will effectively meet all of Columbus’s wastewater treatment needs for decades to come. For Skip Allen, seeing construction at Southerly come to an end after nearly six years is a welcome relief.

“We are all really happy about the changes that have taken place here; there’s no doubt about that. But it feels like we will now finally be able to get back into the treatment plant business. With construction done, we have a big headache behind us, we have a great operation in place, and we’re doing good things for the residents of Columbus. That’s not a bad place to be.”

Columbus_Southerly_odor_hood.jpg

 

To download the entire #14 application report for Columbus, Ohio, click here.

To learn more about Schwing Bioset, our products and engineering, or this project specifically, please call 715-247-3433, email marketing@schwingbioset.com, view our website, or find us on social media.

 

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Tags: Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Municipal Pumps, Sliding Frame Silos, Truck Loading

Upgrading a Reliable Necessity - Piston Pumps at the Greeley WWTP

 

Written by Joshua DiValentino, December 2, 2015

The City of Greeley, Colorado, wastewater treatment facility recently implemented a series of strategic upgrades and major improvements were made to the Biosolids Facility. The Greeley facility repurposes its dewatered biosolids cake by trucking it for land application into remote Northern Colorado. The existing Schwing Bioset piston pump located in the sludge dewatering building had been in operation for 20 years and was a key component of this process.

The Greeley facility had relied on its sole Schwing Bioset KSP 25 cake pump for two decades prior to the upgrades. During that time, the existing pump was the only means of transportation for dewatered biosolids between the centrifuge dewatering equipment and the truck loading bin. The piston pump could have been a “bottle-neck” for a facility with limited storage capacity. However, the existing pump provided an exceptionally high level of uptime over its operational life at Greeley, with minimal wear part consumption.   

By 2014-15 the sole KSP 25 had been in operation since the mid 90’s. The City of Greeley facility, working on a larger plant upgrade, decided to implement a new pumping system for the coming decades. Greeley once again chose to invest in a Schwing Bioset KSP Piston pump.

In order to be as cost effective as possible, but also provide maximum redundancy for the foreseeable future, Greeley chose to purchase a new KSP 25, as well as upgrade the existing KSP unit to modern standards. The existing pump was upgraded to match the new KSP unit with control modifications, and upgraded safety features offer easier remote operation and even longer wear part life. The existing unit was also outfitted with a new Hydraulic Power Unit, offering modern hydraulic feed pumps and unlimited control variability.  The two pumps provide redundancy and additional capacity for growth, as well as a modern control network with the current plant SCADA.

Schwing Bioset KSP Municipal Piston Pump  Schwing Bioset Hydraulic Power Pack

The new pump system included a Hydraulic Power Pack, a Twin Screw Feeder, the Control Panel, and of course the Piston Pump. The Schwing Bioset services team worked with the installing contractor and Greeley personnel to integrate the updated control system features on both pumps with the plant MCC.  The new Schwing Bioset KSP cake pumping system (complete with two fully-operational pumps) was turned over to the City of Greeley in the fall of 2015.       

To learn more about this project specifically or learn more about our pumps, please contact this blog’s author, Josh DiValentino, call 715.247.3433, and/or visit our website here: SBI Municipal Pumps.

 

Tags: Piston Pumps, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Pumps, Municipal Pumps

City of Stockton WWTP - Enduring Performance, Replacing a Legacy

 

Written by Joshua DiValentino, August 27, 2015

 

The City of Stockton wastewater treatment facility has seen its fair share of challenges in recent years. When financial resources were limited, the burden fell upon the operations/maintenance staff and the existing equipment to continue operations with aging infrastructure. At this point, the piston pumps supplied by Schwing Bioset, Inc. (SBI), located in the sludge dewatering building, had been in operation for over 20 years.

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The pair of KSP 25 pumps moved dewatered sludge cake from the dewatering building out to the truck loading building, several hundred feet away. The two systems were the only means of transporting dewatered sludge cake for the 30 MGD facility. Regardless of the operational circumstances, with a resourceful operations/maintenance staff and the help of SBI technical support, the pumps remained in service with over 129,900 hours on the meter.

By 2014-15 the pair of KSP 25’s had been in operation since early 90’s, and were now nearly 25 years old. The City of Stockton facility was now emerging from a turnaround and making critical investment upgrades. Stockton once again chose to invest in Schwing Bioset Piston Pumps and replace the aged pumps with brand new KSP 25’s in the dewatering building. The new pumps have the same durability to last another thirty years, and with upgraded safety and control features that offer easier remote operation and even longer wear part life.

The SBI field services team was also hired to remove the exiting units and re-install the new pumps. The pump system was replaced by SBI in full including; Hydraulic Power Packs, Twin Screw Feeders, Control Systems, and of course the Piston Pumps. The SBI crew was able to work seamlessly with Stockton personnel to not upset active onsite operations during installation. As such, the pumps were replaced in series to phase out the old system. A completely brand new turn-key cake pumping system will be turned over to the City of Stockton this year.          

To learn more about our piston pumps or this project specifically, contact a Schwing Bioset Regional Sales Manager, call 715.247.3433, email us, and/or visit our website here.

  

Tags: Piston Pumps, Wastewater Treatment, Municipal Pumps, Dewatered Sludge Cake

Schwing Bioset is Exhibiting at Several Trade Shows in May

 

Posted on Apr 30, 2015 9:33:00 AM

The Schwing Bioset Teams will be traveling nationally and internationally to exhibit at five trade shows during the month of May. 

To learn more about Schwing Bioset pumps (municipal or mining), fluid bed dryers, screw presses, sliding frames, the bioset process, and more, please be sure to find us on the exhibit floor at any of these upcoming shows:

 

California Water Environment Association (CWEA), April 28 - May 1 in San Diego, CA

http://myac15.com/

Florida Water Resources Conference (FWRC), May 3 - 5 in Orlando, FL

http://fwrc.org/

Canadian Institute of Mining (CIM), May 9 - 11 in Montreal, Canada

http://www.miningandexploration.ca/events/article/cim_2015_convention/

Exponor Chile 2015, May 11 - 15 in Antofagasta, Chile

http://www.exponor.cl/en/

Central States Water Environment Association (CSWEA), May 18 - 20 in Oakbrook Terrace, IL

http://www.cswea.org/events/

 

If you'd like to meet with one of our team members, please contact marketing@schwingbioset.com for the name of the contact(s) who is attending the show.

We look forward to seeing you!

Bioset_Process_ImagePump-Yellow

 

Tags: Announcements, Bioset Process, Events, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Schwing Bioset, Mining Pumps, Municipal Pumps