News from Schwing Bioset

Biosolids Plant Up and Running at Paragould WWTP

 

Published in Paragould Daily Press, August 2020

 

Thanks to a newly completed $5.15 million biosolids plant, not all the waste at Paragould Light, Water and Cable’s Wastewater Treatment Plant is actually going to waste. 

“We send out two 12-[cubic] yard trucks of biosolids a day, Monday through Thursday,” said plant Operations Manager David Romine on Monday. 

Romine said the biosolids, a byproduct of wastewater treatment and processed by the plant’s new Schwing Bioset equipment, go out to area farmers at a cost to them of $5 a cubic yard delivered, such that a fully loaded truck would cost $60.

In addition, the new equipment enables a savings of about $100,000 a year on the cost to operate and maintain the equipment, compared to the old system.

The Schwing Bioset system enables sludge produced to receive a rating of Class A EQ biosolid under the EPA 40 CFR 503 regulation. “The EQ means it’s ‘exceptional quality,’” Romine said, “which means you don’t have to do anything special in order to use it anywhere [as fertilizer].”

 

Click here to read the full article in the Pargould Daily Press

 

The Bioset Process allows the product to be used as a fertilizer under regulation for Class A EQ. Pictured is the Bioset unit, dewatering screw presses, piston pump, and truck loading operation. 

20200831_110158 (2)  20191003_134927

 

 

Tags: Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Dewatering, Wastewater Treatment Plant

The Maine Solution

 

When an upgrade to the biosolids dewatering component at the Westbrook/Gorham Regional WWTP was needed, a screw press has helped the facility dramatically reduce their sludge hauling/handling costs.

Written by Larry Trojak, Trojak Communications

Version also published in WaterWorld, June 2020

 

Schwing Bioset Dewatering Screw Press

 

When an upgrade to the biosolids dewatering component at the Westbrook/Gorham Regional WWTP was needed, plant personnel looked at several different available technologies. Handling secondary sludge alone is challenging, and after an extensive trial and evaluated bid process, they opted for a screw press from Schwing Bioset, Inc. Today, sludge leaving the plant is averaging just above 20 percent solids, and the Westbrook/Gorham Regional WWTP has dramatically reduced costs associated with hauling and landfilling their material. Are they pleased? To quote the locals: “Ayuh.”

 

Diversity in the District

The Portland, Me., Water District (PWD) manages its wastewater treatment through four facilities: East End, the largest plant in the state, which handles wastewater for the Portland metro and surrounding areas; Westbrook/Gorham Regional WWTP, which serves Westbrook, Gorham and a portion of Windham; Cape Elizabeth, which handles wastewater from 3,100 residents in the southern part of the town of Cape Elizabeth; and Peaks Island, which serves 600 island residents — a number that can swell to more than five times that in the summer tourist season. While the Westbrook/Gorham Regional facility is an extended aeration plant, each of the others utilizes a different technology for dealing with their biosolids, according to Steve Picard, the operations foreperson at the plant.

“Within the District, we are certainly varied in our approaches to wastewater treatment,” he said. “East End is a conventional aeration-type plant using clarifiers; Peaks Island is a sequencing batch reactor facility, and Cape Elizabeth is an oxidation ditch plant — they are all similar in many ways but different in others. The Westbrook/Gorham Regional plant was built in 1978. An upgrade to the plant’s aeration system is planned for later in 2020.”

Picard added that three-quarters of the existing plant will be upgraded — a move that will include the addition of new clarifiers mechanisms, a blower facility, and diffused air-type aeration equipment. To show how things have changed, the original plant’s price tag was $14 million; this modification alone is $10 million.

 

Planning Ahead

About two years prior to the plant upgrade, the Portland Water District saw the sludge disposal costs Westbrook was incurring and committed to improving the plant’s dewatering capability. Up until then, the facility, which is rated for 4.54 MGD but treats an average flow of about 3.2 MGD, took sludge from the bottom of the final clarifiers, pumped it to a gravity belt thickener where it was thickened to approximately 4 percent solids, and sent it to a 2.5 meter belt press.

“On a good day, that belt press would give us maybe 17–18 percent solids,” said Picard. “Unfortunately, because we deal strictly with an inflow of secondary sludge here at Westbrook, there weren’t many of those good days. To make matters worse, because we were sending that sludge to a trailer for transport to a landfill about three hours away, we were paying to haul a lot of water that didn’t need to be there. That had to change.”

For Schwing Bioset, finding out about the project was a classic case of being in the right place at the right time. For nearly 30 years, Westbrook has been using a Schwing Bioset KSP 10 piston pump to move sludge from the belt press out to the trailers — a distance of more than 70 feet. Word that they were actively seeking equipment to enhance their dewatering effort got the attention of a technician who happened to be on site.

“When I mentioned that we were about to go out to bid for dewatering equipment, the tech said that Schwing Bioset also made a screw press that could be a good fit,” said Picard. “He went back, told his people, and they were suddenly in the running for the bid along with several other manufacturers. Their timing couldn’t have been better.”

 

Natural Solution

After extensive testing of four manufacturers’ products and a competitive bid process, PWD selected an FSP 1003 screw press from Schwing Bioset.

“Because we already had the piston pump and power pack from Schwing Bioset, we thought that having a screw press from the same manufacturer — a company that we were already very satisfied with — could only work to our advantage,” said Picard. “However, they also outperformed the others we tested and were within our budget, so we felt confident that we’d made a good decision.”

Features that helped make the case for Westbrook included the unit’s low-speed operation — which enhances its lifespan — and automated control. Ease of regular maintenance was also key, including a split screen casing to simplify access for any maintenance activities such as replacing the sealing lip and eventually the screens. Both items can be replaced without having to remove the screw.

“In addition, because the entire operation is now enclosed, all the odor associated with dewatering is contained,” said Picard. “And finally, we liked the fact that the Bioset press could be cleaned while in use, so the dewatering operation would not be impacted by it. All these played a role in our decision.”

 

Getting the Numbers Up

Once the new press was in place (the installation was completed by the same contractor that handled their belt press 28 years ago), Picard and his team were initially stymied trying to find the polymer that would give them the numbers they were anticipating. Using the same product they ran with the belt press resulted in no change: solids in the 17 percent range.

“We suspected that was because, unlike the screw press, the belt press had little to no agitation to it and it held the floc together easily,” he said. “However, by the time we tested our fourth polymer, we started getting solids numbers up in the 19–20 percent range. Connecting the screw press to the polymer injection system we had used with the belt press — then adding two more injection points — got us a bit closer.”

In addition to polymer optimization, there was a period of learning how the new system could be successfully operated at the plant. Doing minor adjustments to the injection system prior to running the screw press for several days without making any changes allowed workers at the plant to verify what worked and what didn’t.

“We were closely tracking our polymer feed rate and the cake coming out of the system and, when we started to break 20 percent solids, knew we were on to something,” Picard said. “We learned that, where the polymer is injected into the system is hugely important. Here, in an area one level down from the press, the polymer goes into a check valve which gives it a good primary mix with the sludge, then comes up and into a huge reaction tank equipped with a variable speed mixer. Using that configuration, the difference was impressive: the 2.5–3 percent feed rate at which we used to feed the belt press didn’t even tax the screw press. Instead, we found out the screw press runs great at 4–4.5 percent, which was a nice plus for us.”

 

Biosolids  Westbrook Wastewater Treatment Plant

 

The Better Choice

With their tweaks in place, Picard and his team at Westbrook saw a continued uptick to the point where they’ve averaged just over 20 percent solids out of the screw press for just over a year now and have seen that number climb as high as 22.5 percent or 24 percent on some days. That has resulted in a net savings — even with added polymer costs factored in — of about $40,000 annually. To the uninitiated, an increase in solids of up to 5.5 percent might not seem substantial. However, that number still represents a 25 percent increase in performance.

And, said Picard, context is key.

“The difference between the two processes is particularly significant when you remember that we are dealing with a straight secondary sludge which is very hard to dewater,” he said. “Even Schwing Bioset rated the screw press at only 19–20 percent under these conditions.

 

Anticipating Change

Today, Westbrook is producing about 30 tons of a better dewatered product every day they dewater during their five-day-a-week operation. By reducing the amount of water in each load, the three-hour trip to the landfill for disposal is far more cost-effective.

“Disposal for us is a costly operation and the Schwing Bioset press has helped significantly knock down those costs,” said Picard. “In addition, there was a good deal of belt spraying, wash water, etc., associated with the previous process, resulting in a constant mist in the air. The place was continually wet where today, things are clean and dry.

He adds that, throughout this conversion process, PWD leadership was outstanding in working with them — giving them support and encouragement all along the way.

“On that note, when we did the screw press install, we kept the belt press here for a year as a backup in case the Bioset didn’t work,” said Picard. “Eventually that belt press was sold for scrap — I guess that says it all.” 

 

Click here to read more about our Products, then contact us to learn more about this project or find out how we can help your plant too.

 

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Tags: Biosolids, Screw Press, Dewatering, Wastewater Treatment Plant

Schwing Bioset Trailer Mounted FSP 1103 Screw Presses Now Available for Contract Operations

 

Written by Kelly Kramer

 

Schwing Bioset is pleased to announce that we can now help solve your dewatering challenges with our fully automated trailer mounted FSP 1103 screw press dewatering systems. Available for onsite demonstrations and/or contract operations, the 1103 screw press is one of our largest models and is engineered for durability, reliability, ease of operation, and low power consumption, making the units an efficient method to dewater.

As with all of our screw presses, our mobile units are designed for quick set up, ease of use, and high-performance for dewatering all types of wastewater. 

One of the screw press features our customers are most excited about is the self-cleaning wash cycles. With low wash water requirements and automation, dewatering operations do not need to be suspended during cleaning and a cleaning cycle typically lasts less than five minutes.

Once dewatered, the solids can be treated, loaded, hauled away, and/or beneficially reused, depending upon the method of the end user.

For more information on our mobile screw press units, please contact our Regional Manager nearest to your plant. The screw press and Schwing Bioset’s full product offering can be viewed here.

 

Schwing Bioset Mobile Screw Press   Schwing Bioset Mobile Screw Press

 

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Tags: Wastewater Treatment, Screw Press, Dewatering, Mobile Screw Press

Screw Press Proves Efficient in Dewatering MBR Sludge

 

Written by Tom Welch

Version also Published in TPO Magazine, August 2019

 

The Decatur, AR, WWTP had existing dewatering technology that proved to be undersized and inefficient. With the additional demands of a new plant upgrade, Operations staff were struggling to meet current dewatering requirements.

The Design Build team and Owner selected an FSP 802 screw press from Schwing Bioset to replace the existing equipment. The new equipment was installed in the same building with primarily service connection modifications. The screw press started operating in November of 2018.

The improvements in the dewatering operations are remarkable, as it is saving Decatur operational expenses in every category. Dry solids content of the dewatered biosolids have improved from an average of 13% to 17%, resulting in less cake to haul. Solids capture rate has improved from less than 80% to 95%, resulting in a lower return load to the plant. Polymer usage is now at 18 pounds active per dry ton, which is well below the consumption rate of the previous technology reducing polymer expenditures.

In addition to these performance improvements, the dewatering capacity has more than doubled. Where it used to take at least two days to load a 25-ton trailer, the plant can now fill a trailer in 6.5 hours, reducing operator efforts in turn. 

With the widest range of machine sizes for several applications, and mobile pilot units available for testing your materials, Schwing Bioset is your comprehensive solutions provider for dewatering.

Click here to learn more about our products or contact our regional manager closest to you.

 

Decatur Dewatering Screw Press

 

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Tags: Biosolids, Screw Press, Dewatering, Membrane Bioreactor

West Rankin Utility Authority to Install Three Schwing Bioset Screw Presses

 

Written by Kelly Kramer, October 2019

 

The West Rankin Utility Authority (WRUA) provides services to several communities in Western Rankin County in Mississippi. WRUA generates approximately 10 to 12 million gallons of wastewater each day, which is currently transmitted to the Savanna Street Wastewater Treatment Plant in Jackson. To take advantage of this service, the authority has to pay Jackson, which costs it a few million dollars each year.

In an effort to save costs in the long run, and operate independently, WRUA has decided to build a brand-new wastewater treatment plant of its own. Schwing Bioset is pleased to announce that our team will be part of this project, with WRUA ordering three of our largest dewatering screw presses, the model FSP1203’s.

The FSP 1203’s are designed to handle a capacity of up to 7,468 dry pounds per hour. For West Rankin, the expectation is to process 24 dry tons per day operating at 60 hours per week, dewatering of 0.75% solids WAS with a 17% solids sludge cake output, and a ≥ 90% solids capture rate.

Schwing Bioset Screw Press     Schwing Bioset Screw Press

The West Rankin screw press system is designed for continuous dewatering of flocculated slurry and consists of a screw press dewatering unit, a flocculation tank, a rotary lobe sludge feed pump, and a liquid polymer blending system. Slow movement and the high-quality design of the structural components guarantee a high service life, and the back-washing cycle cleans the screens automatically so dewatering operations will not be interrupted during washing cycle.

With the new equipment in the new wastewater treatment plant, Schwing Bioset will be able to help West Rankin to bring its system into compliance with federal water quality laws, increase plant capacity, and save on costs in the long run.

To learn more about Schwing Bioset’s dewatering screw presses, contact Chuck at cwanstrom@schwingbioset.com or visit our website.

 

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Tags: Screw Press, Dewatering, Wastewater Treatment Plant

Screw Presses Help Plant Reduce Maintenance Costs

 

Written by Chuck Wanstrom

Version also Published in TPO Magazine, August 2018

 

The city of Bradenton, Florida, operates a wastewater treatment plant that processes roughly 8 million gallon per day. The plant had historically aerobically digested their biosolids and dewatered them to 15% dry solids content using two, 2.0-meter belt filter presses. Due to the age of the belt filter presses, the maintenance expenditures were continually increasing and were creating a burden not only with expenses, but also with personnel time to keep the equipment functioning.

Bradenton began a search to identify new dewatering techniques that could replace the aging belt filter presses.  Several pilot studies were completed, and Schwing Bioset was invited to run our screw press pilot. The pilot proved successful with results of up to 21% dry solids. The Schwing Bioset screw presses were also able to fit within the confines of the available space on the second floor of the existing dewatering building. 

The Schwing Bioset equipment was chosen as the best value and was procured under a sole source contract. The two new FSP902 screw presses were designed into the existing dewatering building and were commissioned early in 2018. The dewatered biosolids exceed the old belt presses cake performance and reduces the city’s hauling and disposal costs while at the same time reducing the amount of wash water required and significantly reducing the maintenance load to city staff. 

Learn more about our screw presses or contact our regional manager closest to you.

 

Bradenton Screw Presses

 

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Tags: Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Screw Press, Dewatering, screw presses

City Converts Biosolids Processing Equipment After Fire Disaster

 

Written by Chuck Wanstrom

Version also published in TPO Magazine, February 2019

 

Home to both St. Olaf and Carleton colleges, the City of Northfield, MN, is located approximately an hour south of Minneapolis and has a population of 20,000. The wastewater plant is approximately 3 MGD and has historically produced Class A biosolids via an open alkaline and thermal stabilization process. Disaster struck in May 2018 when a fire destroyed all of the Class A biosolids processing equipment, as well as the surrounding dewatering and odor control equipment in the building. 

Rather than simply replace the old equipment, the city of Northfield evaluated current available technologies and elected to convert from belt presses to screw presses for its dewatering needs and has purchased two machines from Schwing Bioset to accomplish this. Additionally, the city will continue with Class A biosolids production, but they are converting to Schwing Bioset's Bioset process. The Bioset process is a closed process that contains odors and dust that does not require supplemental heat and has also been approved by the USEPA through the PFRP process to operate at temperatures below those specified in the 503 regulations. 

Final detail design of this pre-purchased equipment is underway and the plant is scheduled to be operational later in 2019. To help the plant bridge the gap in biosolids processing while the new facility is in being constructed, the city is also renting a mobile screw press and Bioset trailer to process their current biosolids production. 

Click here to learn more about our products or contact our regional manager closest to you.

 

Bioset Process and Screw Press Dewatering

 

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Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Screw Press, Dewatering

Sugar Creek WWTP Screw Press Records Impressive Data

 

Written by Tom Welch, November 2018

The Sugar Creek WWTP, owned by the Sangamon County Water Reclamation District located in Springfield, IL, has two Schwing Bioset model FSP 1102 screw presses and our Class B alkaline stabilization process. The screw presses dewater the plant’s aerobically treated biosolids and the downstream equipment produces the alkaline stabilized Class B biosolids. These biosolids are then windrowed in the District’s storage shed and eventually land applied for beneficial use. Data recorded from a recent site visit on a single screw press in operation was impressive and can be seen below.

Incoming Flow: 280 gpm
Incoming % DS: 1.5%
Throughput: 2,100 lbsdry/hr
Polymer Dose: 12 lbs/ton
Output % DS: 22%
Capture: >95%

 

Check out the included photos and operational videos, which show an overview of the installation and the equipment in action. 

Contact your Schwing Bioset Regional Sales Manager to learn more about how our biosolids management systems may be able to improve your current processes.

 

  IMG_0453_small  IMG_0452_small

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tags: Alkaline Stabilization, Biosolids, Screw Press, Dewatering

Dewatering with a Screw Press at Bradenton WWTP

 

Written by Chuck Wanstrom, May 2018

The city of Bradenton, Florida, operates a wastewater treatment plant that processes roughly eight million gallons per day. The plant had historically aerobically digested their biosolids and dewatered them to 15% dry solids content using two, 2.0-meter belt filter presses. Due to the age of the belt filter presses, the maintenance expenditures were continually increasing and creating a burden not only in expenses, but also on personnel time to keep the equipment functioning.

Bradenton began a search to identify new dewatering techniques that could replace the aging belt filter presses. Several pilot studies were completed and Schwing Bioset was invited to run their screw press pilot. The pilot proved successful with results of up to 21% dry solids. The Schwing Bioset screw presses were also able to fit within the confines of the available space on the second floor of the existing dewatering building. 

The Schwing Bioset equipment was chosen as the best value and was procured under a sole source contract. The two new FSP902 screw presses were designed into the existing dewatering building and were commissioned early in 2018. The dewatered biosolids exceed the old belt presses cake performance and reduces the city’s hauling and disposal costs while at the same time reducing the amount of wash water required and significantly reducing the maintenance load to city staff. 

To learn more about this project or our screw presses, contact a regional manager or email us.

 

1  DSCN8025

 

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Tags: Biosolids, Screw Press, Dewatering, Wastewater Treatment Plant

Replacing Failing Filter Press Yields Huge Improvements

 

Schwing Bioset Application Report 22, Seneca Water

Written by Larry Trojak, Trojak Communications

Version also published in WE&T Magazine, October 2016 Issue

 

When the Seneca (S.C.) Water Treatment Plant embarked on a recent expansion project, its overall goals were fairly straightforward: eliminate the use of chlorine in purification, relocate its new chemical treatment process, and upgrade the alum sludge dewatering operation. On that last point, plant officials opted to replace an outdated and difficult to maintain batch filter press with a different technology altogether — a fully-automated screw press — to handle its dewatering needs. In doing so, they not only eliminated an ongoing maintenance headache, they also dramatically improved the efficiency of their dewatering operations as well as their overall residuals management operation.

 

Water for Sale

Built on a hill overlooking Lake Keowee, the Seneca Water Treatment Plant is a 20 million gallon per day (MGD) facility located in Seneca, South Carolina, that serves more than 39,000 residents in and around Oconee County in the far northwestern part of the state. According to Steve Fletcher, the lake is owned by Duke Power Company, which allows the City to draw raw water for municipal purposes.

“As part of the agreement with Duke Power, we take in and treat the lake water, then, once purified, wholesale it to area communities,” he said. “That 20 MGD number is our peak permitted flow — our actual volumes vary, but are generally in the seven to 10 MGD range.”

Storage facilities for the treated and purified water currently consist of three ground storage clear wells and eight elevated tanks with a total capacity of 6.5 million gallons.

Seneca Water Screw Press

 

Risk Management

Until this latest expansion, water disinfection was done using chlorination which, while effective, was seen as a serious potential hazard, said Fletcher.

“When this plant was first built in 1968, there was literally one house in the immediate area,” he said. “However, the lake’s popularity has attracted large-scale development — both residential and commercial — and today the area immediately around the water plant is dense with some very nice homes. Should one of our three one-ton cylinders of chlorine gas have ruptured, it could have seriously affected people for a mile around the plant. We didn’t want to risk that any longer and decided that generating our own sodium hypochlorite was a much safer alternative.”

In addition to the change in chemical process, the expansion also resulted in a brand new operations building which houses not only the offices and administrative staff for the plant, but also includes a new laboratory facility and a common area that will be made available to city residents for meetings and other functions.

“This project really grew as we went along, as did the price tag which went from $3 million to $10 million.” Said Fletcher. “But we knew that, as long as we were making changes, we might as well make all the improvements we’ve talked about wanting for a long time.  Right now this is one of the most functional — and beautiful — water treatment plants around.”

 

Residuals Shortcomings             

Treatment of alum sludge at Seneca Water, the by-product of using aluminum sulfate as a coagulant, has a storied history. When the plant was originally built in 1968 there was no treatment effort at all; sludge was simply returned to the lake. The advent of clean water regulations changed all that and Seneca Water was soon recovering and disposing of its sludge in an area landfill. To dewater the material, Fletcher said the plant officials in about 1990 opted for use of a plate and frame filter press.

“Once installed, that press remained in place up to the recent upgrade and eventually became one of the main motivations behind a re-tooling of the sludge process,” he said. “I’m sure that, in its day, it was a solid performer. In recent years, however, it had become such a headache to maintain that it was a full-time job just keeping it operational. In addition, it ran as a batch process which meant it had to stop after every batch of dewatered sludge it created. We knew there were better solutions available out there and we started looking at them.”

It’s worth noting that the overall configuration of the alum sludge plant was sorely lacking as well. At the time, sludge was collected in the backwash holding basin, sent to a vertical turbine transfer pump, then routed up to a thickener.

“Unfortunately, that thickener was on the top of a hill on the other side of the plant,” said Fletcher. “Hardly the most efficient layout. Once thickened, sludge came back down the hill into a diaphragm pump and into the filter press. The transfer pumps were not only costly to run and almost always in need of rebuilding, they weren’t really designed to pump sludge so they were continually stopping up. All those things collectively got us thinking about ways to improve the overall biosolids process — starting with the press.”

 

Trials and Errors

After a fairly lengthy process of demos and trials, Seneca Water, working through their consulting engineer, chose a screw press from Schwing Bioset, Inc. Fletcher said the unit best met established criteria which were focused on cost versus performance.

“We looked at a number of manufacturers and a number of different technologies and knew that the Schwing Bioset unit would best meet our needs,” he said. “Our old press was taking in sludge with 4% to 5% solids and dewatering it to about 24% solids, so we were hoping for at least that. However, many of the presses we tested were giving us product in the 16% to 17% range — we definitely didn’t need a step backward. The team from Schwing Bioset brought their demo unit online and almost immediately we were getting dewatered sludge in the 28% to 32% range. Equally important, however, was the fact that the screw press was fully-automated rather than a batch-process design. That meant we no longer needed to have a man assigned to the press six hours a day, every day, as we’d done in the past.”

With Seneca Water committed to the Schwing Bioset screw press, additional changes were made to the alum sludge processing line, including the addition of a Model 300 large bubble mixer from Pulsed Hydraulics, Inc. (Oroville, Wash.).

“In the past, we’d had problems with the sludge settling and stagnating in some of the lower parts of the holding basin,” said Tommy Clayton, a Class A operator at the Seneca plant. “This PHi bubble mixer keeps the sludge moving and further increases production through the Schwing Bioset screw press. It has very low energy demands, has no other moving parts and runs off a compressor which we need for the press as well. The two are a perfect fit.”

Seneca Dewawtering Screw Press

 

Pressing Issues

The increase in production with the screw press in place was immediate and substantial. Because of the batch nature of the former plate and frame press, Seneca Water was forced to process sludge continuously all year long. According to Fletcher, that has changed with the addition of the Schwing Bioset unit.

“Now, with the continuous dewatering process we can have material being collected in the basins and, when ready, can get caught up in just two to three weeks. There really is no comparison between the two presses, but it’s safe to say that we can probably do close to two tons of alum sludge a day with the Bioset press while the old press took two days to do just a ton.”

Those old production figures were affected by both the cleaning process and by maintenance-related downtime. The plate and frame press, said Fletcher, had to be washed down after every batch — a process that could take as long as three hours. By comparison, the Bioset screw press has a self-cleaning function in which the screen gets sprayed — while the unit is in operation — cleaning it off.

“That means continuous production and no lost time, which is huge” said Fletcher. “We are saving no less than six hours a day in manpower alone just by nature of not having to have a man on the filter press handling the batch process, cleaning it and so on. However, without a doubt, we are benefiting most by finally having a press that is reliable — we are no longer having to constantly work to keep that unit operational. We simply start up the Schwing Bioset unit and it runs all day long.”

 

Working Together 

Once dewatered, Seneca’s sludge is collected and sent to an area wastewater treatment plant where it is mixed with that facility’s dewatered biosolids and trucked to a landfill in a collaborative city/county effort.

“There are so many facets of our operation that have been improved with this latest expansion,” said Fletcher. “We are much more efficient now, our process is better and far more reliable, and the risk of danger from chemical exposure has been eliminated. That’s a very nice turnaround for us and a benefit to the Seneca community as a whole. We couldn’t be happier with the way things turned out.”

 

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Tags: Water Treatment, Screw Press, Dewatering, Water Plants