News from Schwing Bioset

Schwing Bioset Wraps Up 2016 WEFTEC and MINExpo Tradeshows

 

Posted by Kelly Kramer

The Schwing Bioset team has now wrapped up our two largest trade show displays of the year, WEFTEC and MINExpo. Thank you to everyone who stopped by one of our booths, enjoyed breakfast in our booth, or sent one of your contacts our way. We were able to meet with friends and customers, new and old, to discuss existing and potential projects.  We were also excited to debut our huge FSP 1102 dewatering screw press and our new pumps, the Smartec Sludge Pump and the KSP 315 mining pump (see photos below).

If we weren't able to connect at one of the shows and you'd like more information about Schwing Bioset or our products, please feel free to contact us with questions or download our brochures and application reports.

We hope to see you at one of our upcoming shows! 

 

Schwing Bioset WEFTEC 2016 Screw Press

 

Schwing Bioset WEFTEC 2016 Smartec Sludge Pump

 

Schwing Bioset MINExpo Mining Pump

 

 Download Our Brochures    or Application Reports 

Read More Schwing Bioset  News and Blog Articles

 

 

Tags: Events, WEFTEC, Mining Pumps, Screw Press, Mining Shows, Smartec Pump

Pressing Issues (for Water Treatment Plant)

 

Published in WaterWorld Magazine, February 2016. Written by Larry Trojak.

When a new plant that Davidson Water Inc. (Lexington, N.C.) had recently inaugurated started producing levels of solids almost double what it had anticipated, the company worried that all its advance planning was for naught and the dewatering facet of the process was doomed. However, one of the key components in that effort, a new screw press, met the challenge, giving plant operators the results - and the peace of mind - they needed.

To view this story in its entirety on WaterWorld Magazine's website, click here.

 

To learn more about Schwing Bioset and our screw presses, click here. 

 

Tags: Water Treatment, Screw Press, Dewatering, Ferric Sludge

How Transitioning to Class A Biosolids Saves Money

 

Published in TPO Magazine, February 2016. Written by Larry Trojak.

 

A southwest Florida treatment plant turns to lime stabilization to create Class A biosolids for land application and cuts handling costs significantly.

Cost-effective handling of biosolids is essential to clean-water plants’ economic and environmental performance.

The Immokalee Water and Sewer District in Florida faced a biosolids challenge in 2006. The district had been using drying beds to create Class B biosolids and spending about $500,000 a year to dewater and haul excess material from that process to a landfill.

Facing a change in regulations on land application of Class B material, and wanting to reach the biosolids’ full economic potential, the district looked at alternatives. The ultimate solution was a facility redesign centered on using the Bioset process (Schwing Bioset) to create Class A biosolids. As a result, the district has reduced handling costs by more than two-thirds and produces a Class A product for beneficial use.

Anticipating change

Located about 30 miles southeast of Fort Myers, the heavily agricultural Immokalee district is home to about 24,000 residents. Its wastewater treatment plant was expanded in 2013 from 2.5 mgd to 4.0 mgd design capacity. Until fairly recently, it generated 23,500 gallons of Class B biosolids per day at 1 to 1.5 percent solids.

Gary Ferrante, P.E., an engineer with the Greeley and Hansen engineering firm, says a number of factors in 2006 led the district to review its biosolids operation. “Immokalee’s plant was originally designed with a half-dozen drying beds in which a Class B biosolids was created and used on permitted area farms,” he says.

“While that was effective, the facility is next to a school, which repeatedly complained about students’ health risks and odor. The district later learned that the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection were considering changes to biosolids land application regulations (passed in 2010 as Florida Biosolids Regulation Chapter 62-640 F.A.C.). All that prompted the district to hire a consultant to look at alternatives.”

Lots of options

Based on recommendations from the consultant’s report, in 2007 the district contracted with Synagro Technologies to dewater the Class B biosolids and haul it to a landfill more than 100 miles away. In time, rising prices and an increase in biosolids volume raised annual costs from $309,000 to more than $470,000, providing incentive for the district to pursue other options.

“Working with the district, we put together a couple of proposals and a couple of scenarios within each proposal,” says Ferrante. “The first one covered the design/build/finance of a biosolids facility at the existing location. Options under this plan included handling material from Immokalee only, as well as accepting material from Collier County and making Immokalee a regional processing facility. The second proposal had an outside entity leasing land from the district and constructing a Class A regional processing facility on it.”

An option under that proposal included a continuation of the contract dewatering program while the regional facility was taking shape. In the end, the district chose to establish a turnkey processing facility for its own biosolids sludge only and selected the Bioset process to deliver Class A material.

Schwing Bioset - Bioset Process  Schwing Bioset - Bioset Process

Class A operation

At the new facility, material exits the primary treatment facility’s sludge holding tanks at 1.5 percent solids and is fed directly to a high-performance screw press, selected for a number of reasons, including its relatively compact design.

“Because of the limited availability of usable land, a small footprint for the entire biosolids system was a major consideration, and the Bioset screw press fit in nicely,” Ferrante says. “We’ve found it to be an outstanding dewatering tool, yet extremely efficient in power usage.

“The belt press we looked at would have taken the material from 1.5 or 2 percent solids up to 8 to 10 percent. A centrifuge might get that up to 20 percent, but the electricity costs would be much higher. The screw press takes the material up to 16 percent solids. It uses twin augers and a changing pitch on the screws to advance the material and remove the water. Because it takes far less energy to turn those two screws than to power a centrifuge, the savings in power consumption can be significant.”

Another feature is that district personnel can wash the screw press down while it remains operational, says Michael Castilla, service technician 1: “The Bioset screw press has an automated self-cleaning function which in itself is nice. However, when we have a situation that calls for additional cleaning, we can simply push a button and a cleaning cycle will start. That’s a bonus. To shut a press down for maintenance or repair could cost us a half-day’s performance.”

Positive reaction

After dewatering, untreated biosolids are taken via screw conveyor to a twin-screw mixer in which quicklime and sulfamic acid are added. The mixing resolves issues such as unreacted lime in the final product and yields a highly homogeneous material. From the mixer, a Schwing Bioset KSP-10HKR pump feeds material into a 56 1/2-cubic-foot reactor in which heat from the acid and quicklime reaction raises the pH, stabilizing the mixture and creating a product that meets both Florida Chapter 503.33 and U.S. EPA Class A requirements.

“Retention time in the reactor is about 30 to 45 minutes at temperatures in the range of 122 degrees Fahrenheit,” says Ferrante. “The plant wastes sludge for 16 hours a day, consistently generating about­­­­­ 11 dry tons of the Class A material weekly and doing so at a markedly lower cost than for outright hauling and landfilling.”
Castilla adds that the system’s ease of operation was also key to getting up to speed quickly.

“It is very intuitive and simple to operate,” he says. “However, Schwing Bioset still went to great lengths to ensure that people involved in day-to-day operation are comfortable with it, have a handle on the maintenance routines, and so on. Ian Keyes from their Wisconsin office spent time here mentoring me to such a degree that there’s very little about the system I don’t understand.”

The Class A material exits the system, is loaded onto a manure spreader and taken to an area field where it is applied in place of fertilizer. Eliminating those fertilizer costs alone has saved about $50,000 per year.

In addition to lower costs, the district benefits from a much cleaner, less maintenance-intensive, more environmentally friendly operation. Dust from the lime-based process is controlled using hard-piped or totally enclosed components. Odorous air is contained by the pressurized reactor and then captured and scrubbed under a collection hood before release.

Schwing Bioset - Biosolids Hauling    Schwing Bioset - Biosolids Hauling

Room to grow

The district’s biosolids plant was designed with ample space to install a second identical processing line in case the regional concept becomes a reality. “One of the most important aspects of this system is its ability to accommodate the changes a regional operation would entail,” says Ferrante. “Things like fluctuations in the percentage of solids, increases and decreases in throughput, and compatibility with biosolids from aerobic or anaerobic digestion processes without modification, are all within its design capability.

“Simply put, the district is well positioned to have its wastewater treatment needs met for the foreseeable future. After the $2 million design/build/finance contract was awarded, the district, seeing itself in a good financial position, opted to pay that cost out of pocket, rather than financing it over 20 years.”

The annual operating cost for the new system is about $130,000 a year, including chemicals and electricity. With estimated savings of $370,000 per year over landfilling, the system will pay for itself by about mid-2019.

“This was a case in which Immokalee, a small independent special district with a serious financial headache, took real initiative in getting things done,” says Ferrante. “They will be the beneficiaries of those sound decisions for decades to come.”

 

To view this story on TPO Magazine's website, click here.

To learn more about Schwing Bioset and the Bioset Process, click here.

 

 

Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Piston Pumps, Bioset System, Wastewater Treatment, Fertilizer, Screw Press

We Dewater Water Plants Too - Part Two Alum Sludge

 

Written by Tom Welch, October 26, 2015

Seneca Light & Water, serving the region of Oconee County in South Carolina, operates a 20 million gallons per day (MGD) Water Treatment facility that uses the 18,500-acre Lake Keowee as its source.  The original plant started in March of 1969 as a 4 MGD facility and has advanced to the current rating with several upgrades.

The Seneca water plant uses aluminum sulfate as a coagulant to lower the turbidity of the water.  After a series of processes, the waste aluminum sulfate is dewatered so that as little water as possible is hauled away with the solids.  Historically, a plate and frame press had been used.  Although that equipment provided a reasonably dry product, about 24% solids, the equipment was only able to run in batch processes, was labor intensive, and was not a clean process to work with.

In 2012, Seneca began a search to identify new dewatering techniques that could replace the aging plate and frame presses.  Several pilot studies were completed, and Schwing Bioset was invited to run their screw press pilot in May of 2013.  The pilot proved successful with a result of 27% solids, which was better than the performance of the existing plate and frame press, as well as the other screw press that had been tested.  The Schwing Bioset equipment was chosen as the best value and the new FSP 0403 screw press was designed into the new dewatering building that was commissioned in September of 2015.

The dewatered alum sludge is hauled to the nearby wastewater treatment plant and mixed with the dewatered Biosolids and then hauled jointly to the landfill.  Now in normal production, the FSP 0403 screw press is producing 30% solids on average with a high of 34%, which is even better than the pilot results.  This is all being done with a polymer dose of 5 pounds of active polymer per ton, which has proven to be very cost effective thus far.

Seneca Light & Water has met their goal of replacing their aged plate and frame technology with a very energy efficient screw press that allows continuous processing. 

The new facility in Seneca, South Carolina, is Schwing Bioset’s second successful water plant startup in the Carolinas this year.

To read Part 1 of this blog, which discusses the screw press installation at a water plant using ferric, go here.

To learn more about our dewatering capabilities or this project specifically, contact this blog’s author, Tom Welch, and/or visit our website here: SBI Screw Presses. For other inquiries, call 715.247.3433, visit our website, or follow us on social media.

 

Schwing Bioset FSP 503 Screw Press Dewatered Alum Sludge

 

Tags: Water Treatment, Screw Press, Dewatering, Water Plants

Screw Press and Bioset Demo Leads to Treatment Plant Expansion

 

Written by Tom Welch, September 10, 2015

The Springfield, IL, Metro Sanitary District (SMSD) Sugar Creek Plant is going to be expanding over the next two years.  They currently have no dewatering capability and they treat their liquid sludge with lime and liquid land-apply on their own fields onsite at the plant.  In June of 2013, Schwing Bioset was invited to run a dual demo of their screw press and Bioset systems.  The pilot study was conducted for two weeks where the Waste Activated Sludge (WAS) was dewatered with the screw presses and then converted to a Class A EQ product through the advanced alkaline stabilization Bioset process.  Crawford, Murphy, and Tilly Engineers coordinated the pilot study for the District.

Prior to the pilot study, the plant operations team was leaning toward using belt presses for their future dewatering needs.  They had familiarity with belt presses and they were concerned that screw press technology did not have the capability to meet their requirements of 2660 dry pounds per hour without having to install a large number of screw press machines.  They were basing their concerns on historical screw press throughput capability based on their market research.

Springfield_Demo_Image_1-1

(Pilot Study Setup at SMSD Sugar Creek Plant)

During the pilot study, the Schwing Bioset team brought their FSP 600 screw press machine to dewater the partially aerobically digested WAS.  The goal was to dewater the material to the highest percent solids, with an excellent capture rate, and also with the least amount of polymer consumption.  The dewatered product would then be passed along to the mobile Bioset operation, which is an advanced alkaline stabilization process that can produce a Class A EQ Biosolid end product that can be utilized as a fertilizer or a soil amendment. 

The first week of the demo was utilized to optimize the screw press performance, and the second week to monitor continued performance of the screw press while utilizing the Bioset operation to produce a Class A EQ product. The purpose of this was to monitor the product over a couple month period to determine the stability of the Class A EQ product at the Springfield plant.  Over the two weeks, the FSP 600 screw press unit produced a dewatered product of 30% solids on average, even while operating the machine at 130-150% of design throughput capability.  After polymer optimization, the end result was realized with 14 pounds of active polymer per ton and the capture rate was above 95% during the entire two week period.  During the second week of the pilot, the Bioset system was utilized the entire time and was successful in producing the Class A EQ product.

Based on the successful results of the pilot, SMSD gave Crawford, Murphy, and Tilly the direction to design the new biosolids handling facility to include two high-performance screw presses, each capable of dewatering 1330 dry pounds per hour.  Although they liked the simplicity of the Bioset Class A operation, they were uncertain if the need for Class A was justified for the new facility.  They settled on a Class B Bioset system that utilizes all of the components of the Class A design, except for the reactor.  Space was left in the building to install the reactor in the future should Class A become necessary.  The job bid in December of 2014 and Schwing Bioset received an order for the two high-performance screw presses and the Class B alkalization system in early 2015. 

These FSP 1102 screw presses showcase the capabilities of high-performance screw presses and offer larger plants an appealing alternative to traditional belt filter press or centrifuge dewatering.

To learn more about our screw presses, Bioset process, and/or this project specifically, contact a Schwing Bioset Regional Sales Manager, call 715.247.3433, email us, and/or visit our website here.

Springfield_Demo_Image_2-1

(Class A EQ product at 44% solids)

 

 

Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Alkaline Stabilization, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Screw Press, Dewatering

Schwing Bioset, Inc. is Exhibiting at WEFTEC 2015

 

Schwing Bioset, Inc. is excited to be exhibiting at the 2015 WEFTEC Event in Chicago, IL, on September 28 - 30.  

Please be sure to stop by our booth (#3612) while you're on the exhibit floor. We will be displaying equipment such as a screw press and sliding frame, as well as interactive touch screens and literature.  

The SBI team members attending the show include Executives, Managers, and Regional Sales Managers.

If you'd like to meet with one of our team members, please email us and we'll put you in touch with the appropriate person.

Visit the conference website to view the event details and exhibition map: http://www.weftec.org/. Here is the Schwing Bioset listing for the show.

For more than 25 years, Schwing Bioset, Inc. has been helping wastewater treatment plants, mines, and power generation customers by engineering material handling solutions. Schwing Bioset’s custom-engineered solutions can be found in hundreds of wastewater treatments plants in North America, as well as mines and tunnels around the world.

Our products include, among others, sludge, industrial, and tunnel piston pumps, screw presses, sliding frame and push floor silos, fluid bed drying products, container wagons, Bioset process equipment, and soil conditioners. We also offers spare parts and equipment maintenance services. 

Read about our Bioset Process and Class 'A' Biosolids, Dewatering Equipment, Pumps, and other products hereand then stop by our booth to learn more!

We hope to see you at WEFTEC 2015!

 

DSC06680

 

DSC06704

(Photos from WEFTEC 2014)

  

Tags: Events, WEFTEC, Screw Press

We Dewater Water Plants Too – Part One Ferric Sludge

 

Written by Tom Welch, July 7, 2015

Although primarily thought of as a technology for dewatering in wastewater plants, Schwing Bioset’s screw press has also been successfully applied in water plants.  We recently completed an installation of a screw press at the Davidson Water (ferric sludge) water treatment plant. 

Take a look at part one of a two part article on the successful application of Schwing Bioset’s screw press technology on ferric and alum sludge generated by water treatment plants.

Davidson Water, Inc. is located in Lexington, North Carolina, and is a large membership cooperative with a plant capacity of 35 million gallons per day.  Upon successful pilot trials, Davidson Water selected the Schwing Bioset FSP 602 machine for dewatering its full scale operations.  They are now running at about 85% throughput and obtaining 27-30% solids, with greater than 95% capture rate and less than 20 pounds of active polymer per ton.  Recent operating conditions have achieved dry solids contents as high as 38%!

Davidson Water’s current operations are surpassing the performance demonstrated during on-site pilot trials that were completed almost two years ago and are exceeding their expectations.  Take a look at the photos below of the Davidson Water installation, which show the simple set-up and exceptional performance. 

Stay tuned for Part Two of 'We Dewater Water Plants Too' on dewatering the alum sludge for a water treatment plant in South Carolina.

To see video of the Screw Press in action or learn more about it, contact a Schwing Bioset Regional Sales Manager, call 715.247.3433, email marketing@schwingbioset.com, and/or visit our website here: SBI Screw Presses.

 

Davidson_Water_1 Davidson_Water_2 Davidson_Water_3

Tags: Water Treatment, Screw Press, Dewatering, Ferric Sludge, Water Plants

Schwing Bioset, Inc. Expands its Leadership Position as the Class A/AA Biosolids Solution Provider

 

Published on April 14, 2015 (Somerset, WI)

Schwing Bioset, Inc. has completed another successful Beneficial Reuse installation.  The City of Immokalee, Florida, chose Schwing Bioset to provide not only its Best in Class equipment, but design and build capabilities as well.

The heart of the system is the patented Bioset process and reactor that converts raw sludge into Class AA Biosolids, making it ready for easy land application.  Licensed as a fertilizer in the state of Florida, the Class AA product produced by the Bioset process is a highly marketable and sought after product.  Millions of tons have been produced and beneficially reused by the Bioset process. 

Taking advantage of some of the other high quality products Schwing Bioset offers, Immokalee integrated their Twin Piston Pump and Dewatering Screw Press into their design.

The Immokalee Water & Sewer District Executive Director, Eva Deyo, is very pleased with the system.  “The project came in under budget and went from concept to completion much quicker than other options.  As promised, the Schwing Bioset solution has proven to be easy to operate for our staff and very cost effective to operate, and the end product is exceptional,” said Deyo.  

Schwing Bioset Regional Sales Manager, Tom Welch, is thrilled with the results of the project.  “The City of Immokalee was tremendous to work with throughout the entire process.  Their vision and understanding of the value that the Schwing Bioset solution offered was evident throughout.  They realized after investigating numerous options that you don’t have to break the bank to get state-of-the-art technology,” said Welch.

“The experience of our Design, Engineering, and Project Management Teams has really shown during the execution of this fast track project.  The Schwing Bioset Team has executed on well over $150M in projects, with 2015 proving to be our biggest year ever,” said Tom Anderson, Owner and President of Schwing Bioset.

About Schwing Bioset

For more than 25 years, Schwing Bioset has been helping wastewater treatment plants, mines, and power generation customers by engineering material handling solutions. Schwing Bioset’s custom engineered solutions can be found in hundreds of wastewater treatment plants in North America as well as mines and tunnels around the world.

For questions or more information, please contact Schwing Bioset at 715-247-3433 or marketing@schwingbioset.com, or visit the website at http://www.schwingbioset.com.

SBI Logo Small resized 600

Tags: Bioset Process, Piston Pumps, Municipal Biosolids, Beneficial Reuse, Class 'AA' Biosolids, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Fertilizer, Recycled Waste, Schwing Bioset, Municipal, Screw Press

Screw Press Adds Dewatering to Schwing Bioset Capabilities

Schwing Bioset is proud to announce the addition of a screw press dewatering system to their family of products.

 

Somerset, WI (PRWEB) January 19, 2013

A natural progression enabling clients to work with one dynamic solution provider to solve their biosolids management issues, Schwing Bioset has added Screw Presses to their family of products enabling them to help clients from dewatering to biosolids disposal.

Schwing Bioset Screw Press Dewatering Systems offer the features you want and performance you can count on. From low power requirements and unattended operation to high solids and high capture rates Screw Presses provide exceptional performance at a fraction of the energy and maintenance costs of other technologies.

With eleven models, each built to the same exacting standards, Schwing Bioset offers the widest range of model sizes available and can offer its customers, unlike competing technologies, the same high level of performance from top to bottom in the product line.

With over 65 machines in service and the Schwing Bioset name standing behind the technology for on-going support, municipalities now have a new option to provide superior dewatering performance for their biosolids.

screw press dewatering system

Tags: Biosolids, Schwing Bioset, Screw Press, Dewatering