News from Schwing Bioset

Water Reclamation Facility Steps Up its Approach to Biosolids

 

Written by Larry Trojak, June 2018

 

Central Florida is One “Class A” Place

Much like the State of Florida itself, the Water Conserv II facility, located in Orlando, is all about change. Almost since its inception in 1961, Water Reclamation Facility  (WRF) has been undergoing periodic upgrades, process changes and, at times, major overhauls to keep pace. So it should come as no surprise that, when confronted with the need to replace major anaerobic digestion components that were impacting capacity, all options were on the table. And when the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) indicated that newer, tougher regulations would be impacting continued production of their Class B biosolids product, a range of alternatives was examined. The end result of those efforts is a new Class A Exceptional Quality (EQ) product created through use of the Bioset Process from Schwing Bioset, Inc. (SBI, Somerset, Wisc.) which effectively creates 120,000 lbs. of field-ready fertilizer product per day.  

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Use Then Reuse

Originally constructed in 1961 as the 4 mgd McLeod Road Treatment Plant, the Orlando facility was upgraded to 12 mgd in 1972 to deal with the area’s rapidly growing population and then further expanded to 25 mgd. Then, in the early 1980s, a number of factors, including the realization that the plant’s discharge was adversely affecting the health of nearby waterways, prompted the City of Orlando and Orange County to team up and create what is today called the Water Conserv II Distribution Center (DC) in west Orange County, about 20 miles from the Water Conserv II WRF. The DC reuses about 35 mgd of treated wastewater (reclaimed water) in west Orange County for agricultural, residential and commercial uses, as well as rapid infiltration basins (RIBs) to help with aquifer recharge. According to Paul Deuel, assistant division manager for the City of Orlando Water Reclamation Division, the scope of what was planned for the newly revised treatment plant was impressive.

“Much of this was driven by the growth we were seeing in the early 1980s and the projected impact on the aquifer that serves this area,” he said. “In addition, the EPA was mandating that discharge issues at nearby Shingle Creek be resolved. So, the Water Conserv II DC, which combined newly improved processes with the use of reclaimed water for area irrigation, was born. That last point is huge: up until then, very little agriculture involved the use of reclaimed water. The Water Conserv II DC went that route and for a long time was the largest citrus irrigation project in the world to do so.”

The move to make the resource available resulted in a contract which provided early participants access to free reclaimed water for a period of 20 years. For some, according to Deuel, the benefits proved invaluable.

“In the case of the citrus growers, this agreement provided a guaranteed water source, even in times of shortages or drought,” he said. “In addition, it could be used for frost and freeze protection when the lives of the trees themselves were at risk. Once we became established, additional users joined in over the years, including several area golf courses, Valencia Community College, Universal Studios’ theme park (which uses it both for site irrigation and in their cooling towers), the Mall at Millennia, even apartment complexes and single-family homes. It has really proven itself an invaluable resource.”

 

Time Takes a Toll

As mentioned, Conserv II WRF has been undergoing change of one sort or another since its inception. When major components in the anaerobic digestion area began to show signs of wear — and failing on an increasingly regular basis — the facility team started running the numbers to weigh the cost of shoring up the Class B biosolids operation or going in a new direction entirely.

“We started looking at the costs needed to rehab the anaerobic digesters to achieve [Class B] biosolids,” said Steve Shelnutt, Water Conserv II WRF plant manager. “At about the same time, FDEP advised us that new regulations, specific to the generation of a Class B product, were being implemented. It was obvious that continuing to do Class B was going to be more challenging and more costly. So, we began looking at alternatives available to us.”

Shelnutt said they contracted with engineering firm Black & Veatch and considered a combined heat and power process that still relied on anaerobic digestion but, because it went into the thermophilic range, it would give them the Class A EQ product they desired  “However, it also added a nutrient load back to the plant,” he said. “So, they sought to remedy that by recycling the gas it created, treating the side streams, and so on. Unfortunately, the project costs started growing into the $40-60 million capital range — far beyond what we had envisioned.”

 

Let the Games Begin

As is so often the case in any industry, word that Water Conserv II WRF was seeking alternative processing methods traveled quickly. One of the first to call upon them, according to City project manager Kristi Fries P.E., was Brian Schuette, vice president of Moss Kelly, Inc., SBI’s Florida sales representative.

“Brian came in and, based on equal parts: what the Bioset Process could do for us and its estimated costs, quickly got our attention,” said Fries. “He told us that he could take us into a Class A EQ fertilizer-grade product for about $1.8 million. Compared with the other proposal which seemed to be growing more expensive by the day, this seemed almost too good to be true. At the same time, we were hearing from other manufacturers who pitched their processes, each of which had some good points, but ultimately didn’t give us what we really needed.”

The alternatives examined included upgrading the anaerobic digesters, a process that employed a high-pressure steam pre-treatment, another which used a technique to accelerate the composting process, and others.

“We did an evaluation of capital costs for each, measured it against the proposed end-product, and decided that we would move forward with the Bioset Process,” said Shelnutt. We also took a ‘field trip’ to two different Florida locations where the process was already in operation and liked what we saw. In fact, our chief operator and I spent a good deal of time talking to the staff discussing the process and hearing how they felt about it. That really helped us make our decision.”

Bioset_Edited_Small

 

Feeling the Heat

The Bioset Process which Water Conserv II WRF has embraced takes biosolids that have been dewatered to about 15% dry solids and, using Schwing KSP-25 piston pump, routes it to a twin-screw mixer in which quicklime and sulfamic acid are added and blended. This type of mixing ensures a homogeneous product and alleviates issues such as unreacted lime in the final product — and the associated costs associated with it.

“At that point, the Schwing KSP-25 piston pump feeds material into the reactor in which heat from the acid and quicklime raises the pH level, thereby stabilizing the biosolids mixture and creating a product that meets EPA 503.33 requirements,” said Shelnutt.

Because the ammonia that is generated through addition of the lime is entrained with the biosolids inside the reactor, thereby killing the pathogens, the Bioset approach has been approved as a process to further reduce pathogens (PFRP). This approval allows the Bioset process to operate at 55°C (131°F) with a residence time of 40 minutes (versus 70°C (158°F) for 30 minutes) lowering operating costs by approximately 35%.

The stabilized Class A EQ product exits the reactor and is pumped directly to a pair of waiting trailers. Even though it is discharged from the process above 25% dry solids, the new product has very little surface tension until it cools, improving its flow characteristics and making it self-leveling in the trucks. According to Deuel, having SBI involved took care of an important step in the upgraded biosolids process: finding a customer for the end-product.

“We are fortunate in that Schwing Bioset has arrangements worked out with customers here in Florida who are anxious to take the Class A EQ material,” he said. “In this case, it is an organization called the Deseret Ranch which runs a cattle operation on about 295,000 acres (450 square miles) in Central Florida. And while they are happy to take the product in its raw form, Bioset will also accommodate customers who demand a pellet or finer product. Not having to deal with [the disposition of] the biosolids has been a nice bonus for us.”

 

Weathering the Storm

Schwing Bioset’s sister company, Biosolids Distribution Services (BDS) provided the first six months of hauling and marketing of the Class A EQ material .  Utilizing more than 15 years’ experience, BDS was able to add the production from the Water Conserv II WRF to their current operation. 

The benefit of having BDS haul Water Conserv II WRF’s Class A EQ product was felt soon after the equipment was installed, as Hurricane Irma struck in September of 2017. Due to the high-water table levels after the hurricane’s passage, virtually all sites available for Class B land application couldn’t be utilized and it wasn’t until three months later, when groundwater levels dropped, that those fields could be accessed again. The plant would likely have incurred substantial additional disposal costs taking Class B material to either landfills or longer-distance application sites that could still receive Class B biosolids. BDS and the city only missed one day of scheduled hauling — the actual day the hurricane struck. Otherwise it was business as usual leading up to and immediately after the storm.

 

The Need for Feed

Making the switch from a Class B biosolids product to a Class A EQ was not without its challenges. For example, at 371 cu. ft., the reactor installed at the Orlando site is quite large, yet the footprint in which the major components had to be installed was extremely tight. In addition, one of Water Conserv II WRF’s primary stipulations said that that their new process needed to be fully automatic.

David Bass P.E., Water Reclamation Division manager added. “We needed to automate everything. So the programming needed to achieve that was intricate and demanding. But Schwing Bioset, working with our own programmers, was able to make it happen.”

A good example of that automation at work can be found in the system’s lime feed process. At Water Conserv II WRF, should the temperature in the reactor drop, the lime feed will automatically increase; conversely, if the process is found to be running too hot, the lime feed will decrease. The program also monitors the output of the transfer pump and — whether they are running one or two dewatering presses — if the pump starts adding more sludge to the outside hopper it will also speed up the lime.

“This has taken our biosolids process to a whole new level,” says Shelnutt. ”We’ve gone from a situation in which the staff felt they needed to monitor things constantly, to one in which they are totally comfortable letting it operate as designed. Everything is now controlled by the HMI (human machine interface) on the control panel and, despite a few hiccups at the outset, it has proven an outstanding solution for us.”

Pump-1 

All About the Change

In its previous Class B biosolids scenario, four belt filter presses discharged the dewatered biosolids onto two belts that led to an incline conveyor, then to a traveling conveyor which deposited it into trucks below. True to Water Conserv II WRF’s spirit of continual improvement, those two belts are in the process of being converted to screw conveyors and rather than converging in the center, will go in opposite directions and dump into a pair of Schwing KSP-25 transfer pumps.

“Those pumps take the biosolids to the Bioset unit outside,” said Shelnutt. “While it would have been great to have the entire biosolids process under one roof, size constraints made that impossible. This plant is on an area that measures less than 40-acres — relatively small for a plant of this size — and any open space we have remaining has already been slated for other use such as new clarifiers, additional aeration, etc.  However, this does allow us to keep the Bioset process close to the trailer loading area, which was also important for us.”

Shelnutt added that the system design features a pair of Schwing Bioset bulk storage silos for redundancy in the lime storage area. They will also be keeping the traveling and incline conveyors as a backup, should there be anything that results in a service interruption to the Bioset system. In that case, they can simply send material through the belt presses and haul it to another facility for processing. “It’s an option, albeit an expensive one, but it is better than being completely out of business,” he added.

The biosolids process now in place at Water Conserv II WRF is capable of processing 20 dry tons/day and Deuel said that under normal conditions they would do about half that. “Right now, however, we are pulling material that has been stored from the shutdown of the anaerobic digesters,” he said. So we are doing between three and six trailers a day, depending on hauling and plant variables.”

 

Solid Relationship

According to Shelnutt, the relationship between the Water Conserv II WRF team and Schwing Bioset has been a good one, based equally on the product’s proven performance and the company’s quick, consistent response to their needs.

“It seems like such basic business sense, but while far too many companies don’t seem to get it, Schwing Bioset does,” he said. “By way of an example: we had a problem with an acid hopper, determined that we caused the problem, and went back to the manufacturer to order a new one. They wanted more details and were dragging their feet on the replacement. SBI found out about it and interacted with that manufacturer directly to make things right. We felt that was over and above what is expected of an equipment supplier — but it’s solidified our relationship.”

Obviously, given the savings cited and the market for the product, Water Conserv II WRF’s decision to go with the Bioset process was largely based on economic concerns. However, according to David Bass, they were also committed to the idea of having a usable, in-demand product leaving their facility.

“It seems like so many biosolids management facilities are coming and going; people are losing their permits, others are opting to leave the industry, and so on,” he said. “And to a certain extent, I can see that. If we were still generating a Class B product, the increasingly stricter regulations that the FDEP and EPA are now promulgating require a much larger application setback than previous regulations. We wanted to eliminate issues like that, create a viable product, and feel good about our operation. The Bioset Process was definitely the right solution for us at this facility.”

 

To learn more about this project or how we can help your plant, contact a regional manager or email us.

  

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Tags: Bioset Process, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Pumps, Biosolids Storage, Wastewater Treatment Plant

Schwing Bioset is Offering Two KSP Pump Training Seminars in 2018

 

Posted by Kelly Kramer, January 2018

 

The Schwing Bioset Service Team is excited to announce that it will be holding two KSP Pump Training Seminars in 2018!

Both sessions will be in May at our facility in Fort Myers, Florida. Attendees will join our instructors for classroom and hands-on KSP Pump Training and learn how to properly use, maintain, and troubleshoot pump equipment. They will have the chance to learn more about basic hydraulics, poppet valves, power packs, setting pressures, screw feeders, troubleshooting, and more!

The regular cost to register is $1295, but if you register early (by February 14th) you can receive $245 off of your registration fee. Our classes do fill up, so please reserve your spot now. 

The deadline to register for the spring seminars is March 23rd. You can get more information and registration forms at the link below.

For questions or to register, please contact Ashley at ahinrichs@schwingbioset.com or (715) 247-3433. 

 Click Here for Info on our   KSP Pump Training 

 

Schwing Bioset Pump Training Seminar    

 

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Tags: Announcements, Events, KSP Service Seminar, Pumps

A Pump for Growth at the Pinos Altos Paste Plant

 

Written by John Brown and Jose Luis Diaz

The Pinos Altos mine is located in northern Mexico in the mountains west of Chihuahua and is owned by Agnico Eagle. With more than eight years of operation utilizing both conventional open pit and underground paste backfill mining techniques, the mine now is set to increase its underground production to its design capacities. The major components of this expansion include increasing the hoisting capacity as well as increasing the capacity of the paste plant. The key element in the expansion of the paste plant is the piston pump utilized to transport the paste back underground to the stopes.

Pinos Altos Mine
 

Pinos Altos has been successfully using a Schwing Bioset KSP 140 pump with a capacity 80 m3/hr since the inception of the project nearly a decade ago. The solid performance and low operating and maintenance requirements made the selection of a larger KSP 220 piston pump from Schwing Bioset for the plant expansion project an easy decision.

Schwing Bioset delivered the new KSP 220 pump and a 1,000HP hydraulic power unit in July 2017. Our technicians returned to Pinos Altos in November 2017 to commission the new equipment to complete this phase of the project. Design discharge capacity for the paste plant has increased to 110 m3/hr and operates with extremely high efficiencies. The new pump is equipped with Schwing Bioset’s proprietary Ideal Control Circuit (ICC), which reduces paste flow velocity changes at the end of each pumping stroke to mitigate the pressure surges commonly seen in paste pipelines and provide a more smoothly operating pumping system.

Pinos Altos Pump 1
 

The new pump transfers paste approximately 2.1 km underground at which point it is distributed to the appropriate stopes up to another 600 meters at an angle of inclination up to 32 degrees. This system is remotely controlled from the existing operations room on the surface and has allowed the operating capacity of the paste plant to increase by 30%, meeting all the projections from the beginning of the project.

To find out about our mining pump solutions, contact us or learn more here.

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Una bomba para el crecimiento - planta de pasta de Pinos Altos

La mina de Pinos Altos localizada al Norte de México en las montañas del Estado de Chihuahua perteneciente al grupo canadiense Agnico Eagle, por cerca de ocho años de operación ha utilizado ambas técnicas de minado, tajo abierto convencional y sistemas subterráneos de relleno hidráulico. La mina fue diseñada para incrementar su producción subterránea a sus capacidades inicialmente establecidas. La mayor razón de esta expansión incluye el incremento de capacidad operativa como también el incremento de producción de la planta de pastas. El elemento clave en expandir la producción de la planta de pastas en el pasado ha sido la utilización de la bomba de pistones para el transporte de la pasta de regreso al subterráneo de las cámaras.

Pinos Altos ha estado utilizando la bomba Schwing Bioset modelo KSP 140 con una capacidad de 80 m3/hr desde hace una década. El sólido rendimiento, el bajo costo operativo y de mantenimiento hicieron de la selección del modelo KSP 220 para la expansión de la planta de pastas, una decisión no muy difícil de tomar.

Schwing Bioset hizo entrega de la nueva bomba KSP 220 con su respectiva unidad hidráulica de 1000HP de potencia en Junio del 2017. Nuestros técnicos retornaron a Pinos Altos en noviembre de 2017 para el arranque y comisión de esta fase del proyecto. El diseño de la capacidad de descarga de la planta de pastas fue incrementada a 110 m3/h, operando con gran precisión y eficiencia. La nueva bomba equipada con un sistema propiedad Schwing Bioset llamado Circuito Ideal De Control o como sus siglas en ingles “Ideal control Circuit (ICC)”, el cual reduce los cambios de velocidad de flujo de pasta al final de cada golpe de bombeo, mitigando de esta forma, arietes de presión comúnmente vistos en las tuberías de pasta y proporcionando un sistema de bombeo estable.

La nueva bomba transporta la pasta aproximadamente 2.1 Km al subterráneo de la mina, para luego escalar 600 metros con un ángulo de inclinación de 32 grados, para finalmente ser distribuida a los distintas cámaras de relleno.

Este sistema es remotamente operado desde la sala de controles existente desde la superficie. Esto ha permitido el incremento de la capacidad operativa de la planta de pasta en un 30%, de acuerdo a las proyecciones hechas desde el inicio del proyecto.

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Tags: Pumps, Mining, Mining Pumps, Paste Backfilling, Paste Pumps

Pump Performance is Key in Nevada Mine Dewatering Operation

 

Schwing Bioset Application Report 16, Turquoise Ridge, NV

Written by Larry Trojak, Trojak Communications

Version also published in Engineering & Mining Journal 

 

Water is a critical element in any mining effort, aiding in everything from dust suppression to actual material recovery. Encountering larger volumes of it, however, can also be one of the biggest hindrances to mine production and efficiency. And when that water contains solids with trace amounts of gold, removing those solids is suddenly a very different procedure, changing from a material disposal effort to one with a focus on material recovery. Such is the case at the Turquoise Ridge gold mine near Golconda, NV, where a pair of Schwing KSP-50 sludge pumps are being used to get dewatered material to a site where its highly-valued content can be recovered. The fact that the area is 1,800 feet straight up and the material has a 40% solids content has taxed such previous efforts. However, the system currently in place has been performing flawlessly for better than nine years now, testimony to both its design and the heartiness of the equipment itself.

 

Water, Water, Everywhere . . .

The mine at Golconda, an almost decade-long joint venture between industry giants Barrick and Newmont Mining, sits on 50 square miles and has been in operation under various names and ownerships since the early 1900s. With a mine that size (current annual gold outputs at TR are in the 200,000 ounce range), encountering water is a normal part of the process and Turquoise Ridge is no exception, according to Bill Davenport, dewatering supervisor.

“It’s not uncommon to hit ‘pods’ of water or underground streams within the fractures of the rock; it is all naturally occurring water,” he says. “We have a huge development drift in the very bottom of the mine on the main decline drift and at the brow of that drift there is water coming out that just runs down the ramp. There are also areas on another drift in which we were drilling and blasting in advance of utilities and hit a pod that started releasing hot water at a rate of about 40 gallons/minute. Today, throughout the mine, we are pumping out between 650 and 700 gallons a minute—more than a million gallons a day.”

Schwing Bioset Mining Pump 

Waste? Not!

Previous efforts to deal with water issues first included using basic sumps to remove it. Mine personnel would then simply muck the residual solid material, dry it out in various drift locations and haul it to the MHD (material handling drift) to be shipped out of the mine. That all changed when it was discovered that the waste product had value.

“Back then, the residual material wasn’t being assayed for gold value so it was seen as nothing more than waste,” says Davenport. “When it was found to have a decent ore content, the whole process had to be revised. One effort included shipping the discharge water directly to a treatment process facility where it was treated for arsenic and other impurities. There, it was stored in a huge 500,000 gallon thickening tank, the solids were collected and sent on to the tailings facility using underflow thickener pumps.”

While that thought process was sound, adds Davenport, the decision to pump directly to the surface, rather than cascade-pump it from level to level, proved too much for that type of equipment. “When the pumps would fail—which was often—we would flood,” he says.

Around that same time, a hydrology study conducted by an engineering firm warned that, because of the inevitability of hitting more and more large pockets of water, a serious process upgrade was needed.

The JV team regrouped and opted for a design with clarifiers to settle out the dirt and decided that a positive displacement pump would be the best solution to handle a push of that vertical distance. In 2004, a major upgrade to the dewatering effort—including installation of a pair of 200 hp Schwing Bioset KSP 50 HDV sludge pumps—took place and has been at work ever since.

 

Positively Beneficial

Today all the water from the mining effort at Turquoise Ridge is captured through a series of multi-location, multi-level sumps and drain holes and shipped to either permanent pump skids (with 4” X 3” centrifugal pumps) or to 8” X 6” permanent pump stations. From there it is directed to a trio of 16,000 gallon clarifiers located an area in a drift adjacent to the main dewatering station. The clarifiers act as thickeners allowing the solids in the dirty water to settle out. The clear water is decanted into two other larger 19,000 gallon clear water basins. Half of that clear water is sent on for subsequent treatment and routed to rapid infiltration basins in nearby Valley; the remainder is re-used in the mining operation. Infiltrated water meets Federal drinking water standards.

“At that point, we have to dispose of the solids from the clarifiers, and the pumps make that possible,” says Davenport. “After leaving the clarifiers, that material is about 20% solids content and it has to be pumped through 3-inch pipe almost vertically for a distance of about 1,900 feet. Just after it reaches the collar of the shaft, it is discharged into a 12-inch pipe and carried roughly a mile and a half to the tailings area. That’s an amazing load to place on any piece of equipment”

When the solids content of the material gets too high for effective pumping, onsite personnel simply introduce water to the mixture using a port at the pump’s suction box, lowering the solids and enhancing flowability. Davenport says they run the pumps at the start of each shift for about three hours, and move, on average, about 15 tons of material in a 24-hour period. While performance is an obvious attribute, he is equally pleased with the pumps’ low maintenance demands, citing only a periodic change of poppets, pressure seats and ring to keep them in “fighting” shape.

“By comparison, over at one of our sister mines, we have duplex pumps working in support of autoclaves and the slurries they create. Those are extremely expensive pumps and the maintenance demands associated with them are brutal—that’s a tough one-two punch. Because mines are all about production, they have those pumps working continuously at maximum speed and, as a result, are constantly replacing pistons, rings and so on. Granted, we are only doing a fraction of the volumes they are, but we are pumping against 800 p.s.i. which is huge. As far as reliability and cost to operate, I’m certain our pumps are hands-down a better investment.

Schwing Bioset Underground Mining Pumps 

Additional Recovery

As mentioned above, even the waste product from a mine contains gold—in this case, about ¼ ounce per ton—so material that has been placed to the tailings area is far from ready for disposal.

“The material that the pumps moved out to those 13 cells is dug out and spread to dry prior to shipping it off to Newmont’s Twin Creeks facility to start the process of final recovery. At that point all the gold will have been recovered,” says Davenport

Mining is a tough application on any piece of equipment, but especially so on one that is regularly dealing with high operating pressures and abrasive material. Davenport cites the reliability of the equipment and the solid support they’ve received since installation almost a decade ago as key reasons for that ongoing success.

“My guys maintain them well; in this business you have to,” he says. “But these pumps have been extremely good at providing support to our operation. This mine is growing and its growing to a point where there might be some changes made in a couple of years. There is talk about adding another dewatering site in the lower part of the mine and installing some additional sludge pumps. I can’t say what will happen at that point, but there’s no denying we’ll be thinking about the outstanding performance we’ve gotten from the pumps.”

 

Contact us to learn more about our pumps for mining, municipal, or industrial applications.

 

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Tags: Sludge Pumps, Pumps, Mining, Mining Pumps

Another Successful Schwing Bioset KSP Pump Service Seminar is Complete

 

Written by Kelly Kramer

May 2017

Schwing Bioset, Inc. (SBI) held its Spring KSP Pump Service Seminar from May 9 – 11 in MN/WI. The seminar was our most well-attended seminar yet and, once again, led by Schwing Bioset’s Quality Control Specialist, Jack Koehler, and Service Technician, Chris Kohnen. The seminar and training is designed for Schwing Bioset customers to expand their knowledge on how to properly use and maintain their equipment, to help ensure they get the most out of it. This spring, there were 23 customer attendees and three of Schwing Bioset’s employees who attended. The course provides 24 hours of training credits toward quality training and education for the attendee.

The first two days of training were held in the classroom and covered safety, operations, maintenance, and basic hydraulics. The third day was factory training, which provided hands-on experience where attendees train with the SBI Parts/Service and Quality Control departments, working directly with equipment to learn about its use, maintenance, and using it safely. Some of the topics discussed include hydraulics, poppet valves, power packs, schematic reading, troubleshooting, screw feeders, sludge pumps, preventative maintenance, and much more.

 

 DSC_0025.jpg  Schwing Bioset Pump Training

 

Some feedback we received from the seminar attendees include:

“Very informative and all subjects were covered well. All around fun and above what was expected.”

 “I am impressed. Schwing employees were over the top helpful and accommodating. I would find it difficult to improve the experience.”

 “The training, evening events, and professionalism of the Schwing Bioset staff was excellent!!”

“The entire seminar was great. Very knowledgeable instructors.”

“The Schwing Bioset instructors and tech’s combine the training with enjoyment. I liked all of it.”

“Great class. Great instructors. Awesome. Everything.”

“Great seminar. Jack and Chris do an awesome job and show dedication to their trade.”

“Everything was great. An awesome time.”

 

Schwing Bioset Pump Training  Schwing Bioset Pump Training

 

Schwing Bioset offers KSP Pump Service Seminars throughout the year. The next training will take place in Toronto in October 2017. Training fills up fast, so please register right away if you are interested in attending. For general inquiries or if you are interested in our Spring 2018 session in MN/WI, please email Kelly with questions or to get on the wait list.

Our Service Department is also available to come to your location and train at your facilities. If that is an option you’re interested in, please contact our Service Manager, Paul Katka, at (715) 350-6913.

 

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Tags: Events, KSP Service Seminar, Pumps

Schwing Bioset, Inc. Onsite University Gives Students Pump Knowledge

 

Written by Dan Anderson

With our legendary spring pump school right around the corner, our Service department wants to let everyone know that our school can also come to you!

Having an onsite pump training can be a great tool to help expand your staff’s knowledge of the equipment in your wastewater treatment plant or at your mine. Plus, training credits are offered.

With one of our Service Technicians as the instructor, we offer customized programs tailored to the specific equipment at your plant. Attendees will have the opportunity for hands on demonstrations and instruction, in addition to learning about pump hydraulics, poppets, rams, safety, and more.

Schwing Bioset Pump Training

Here are a few quotes from previous service school attendees:

“I would recommend anyone involved with Schwing Bioset products to take this seminar. They have super customer service and an invaluable learning tool in these seminars.”

“Very worthwhile. Would recommend to any technicians who works on Schwing Bioset pumps. I am grateful for the privilege to attend.”

“The instructors were excellent. I learned a lot and had fun doing it.”

Whether it’s at your plant or at our location, we look forward to educating you and your operators soon.

To learn more about our onsite trainings, please contact Paul Katka at pkatka@schwingbioset.com or 715.247.3433.

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Tags: Announcements, KSP Service Seminar, Pumps

Schwing Bioset Offering Two KSP Pump Training Seminars in 2017

 

Posted by Kelly Kramer, February 13, 2017 

 

The Schwing Bioset Service Team is excited to announce that we will be holding two KSP Pump Training Seminars in 2017!

Our first will be this spring from May 9-11 in Stillwater, MN and at our facility in Somerset, WI. Here attendees will join us for classroom and hands-on KSP Pump Training and learn how to properly use, maintain, and troubleshoot pump equipment. The deadline to register for the spring seminar is April 3rd.

We will also be having a seminar this fall in Toronto from October 17-19. Join us for classroom learning and hands-on demonstrations to gain an understanding of equipment, use, and safety. The deadline to register for the fall Toronto training is July 14th.  

Attendees will have the chance to learn more about basic hydraulics, poppet valves, power packs, setting pressures, screw feeders, troubleshooting, and more!

The regular cost to register is $1195, but if you register early you can receive $100 off of your registration fee. Our classes do fill up, so please reserve your spot now.  Click Here for Info on our   KSP Pump Training 

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Tags: Announcements, Events, KSP Service Seminar, Pumps

Schwing Bioset Wraps Up 2016 Spring KSP Pump Service Seminar

 

May 17, 2016

Schwing Bioset KSP Pump Training Schwing Bioset KSP Pump Training

The first two days of training are held in the classroom and cover safety, operations, maintenance, and basic hydraulics.  The third day of training provides hands-on experience where attendees train with the SBI Parts and Service, Quality Control, and Customer Service departments working directly with equipment to learn about its use, maintenance, and using it safely.  Some of the topics discussed include hydraulics, poppet valves, power packs, schematic reading, troubleshooting, screw feeders, sludge pumps, preventative maintenance, and much more.

Schwing Bioset typically offers two KSP Pump Service Seminars per year.  The next training will take place in the fall of 2016.  Training fills up fast, so please consider registering ahead of time if you are interested in attending.

Our Service Department is also available to come to your location and train at your facilities. If that is something you’re interested in, we would be happy to provide you with a quote.  Please contact Paul Katka, the SBI Service Manager, at (715) 350-6913, if you would like more information for this option.

Some feedback we received from the seminar attendees include:

"Very accomidating to everyone's needs and opinions. All Schwing Bioset employees I met at both the seminar and plant were more than decent. Keep doing what you do, wouldn't change a thing."

"Everything was very professional and well rounded."

"I liked this program. I had a good chance to understand the hydraulic system and troubleshooting. The hands on portion in the shop was also impressive. It was a very good experience!"

"The seminar was very informational. The hands on portion was very good. I learned a lot and learned how to troubleshoot on the powerpack and pump. Very successful class."

"Very satisfied with the training, the people involved and the material. Thanks for all the care and the exceptional training."

For questions about this training or to inquire about a future training at Schwing Bioset, please contact Tanya at: tweinzierl@schwingbioset.com or marketing@schwingbioset.com

 

 Read More Schwing Bioset  News and Blog Articles

 

Schwing Bioset, Inc. (SBI) held its Spring KSP Pump Service Seminar from May 10 to May 12.  The seminar was once again led by Schwing Bioset’s Quality Control Specialist, Jack Koehler.  The seminar and training is designed for Schwing Bioset customers to learn how to properly use and maintain their equipment, to help ensure they get the most out of it.  This spring, there were nine customer attendees and six of Schwing Bioset’s employees who attended.  The course builds 24 hours toward quality training and education for the attendee.

Tags: Events, KSP Service Seminar, Pumps, Equipment Maintenance

Diversity, Equipment Longevity are Key for New York Wastewater Plant

 

Schwing Bioset Application Report 15, Glens Falls, NY

Written by Larry Trojak, Trojak Communications

Version also published in TPO Magazine, August 2013

Dewatering at WWTP

While most wastewater treatment plants focus their efforts solely on the material collected from within their own municipality, some choose-often for economic reasons-to supplement that volume with outside waste. After a major expansion in the late 1980s, and an upgrade in the mid-1990s, the city of Glens Falls (NY) Wastewater Treatment Plant found itself in just such a situation and opened up its facility to non-system waste. Today, drawing from a wide range of sources, the plant accepts an equally broad range of materials including: grease trap waste, sanitary holding tank waste, septage, sewer cleaning debris and wastewater sludge-both liquid and cake-from off-site facilities. That product diversity, coupled with impressive long-term equipment performance, has helped the plant remain viable in serving the upstate New York city and surrounding areas.

Legacy Lives On

Located on the Hudson River about 45 minutes north of Albany, Glens Falls is a picturesque small city, home to just under 15,000 residents, and a thriving base for the medical device and medical services industries. The city was also the site of a huge pigment manufacturing facility that was shut down in the 1980s, but left a legacy of contaminated soil in its wake. Today, nearly three decades after its closing, wastewater from the site’s groundwater treatment and collection system is still being processed at the Glens Falls WWTP, according to Jason Vilander, the plant’s maintenance manager.

“That pigment plant was actually a driving force in an expansion that took place here in the mid-‘80s,” he said. “A lot of water is used in chemical and dye work—water that couldn’t simply be discharged to the river—so the plant was designed to accommodate that additional wastewater volume. That expansion allowed us to move to activated sludge treatment and prompted installation of a fluid bed incinerator. Unfortunately for us, the pigment plant shut down during the latter part of our expansion, leaving us with a good deal of extra capacity.”

Since that time, Glens Falls WWTP has had an ongoing contract to accept and treat water from the groundwater collection system from the pigment plant site.

Filling the Void

Needing to fill the excess capacity left by the pigment plant’s untimely closing, Glens Falls WWTP began to actively seek companies or organizations looking to outsource their wastewater and waste product treatment needs. To say those efforts were a success would be an understatement. Today, the plant serves a fairly localized geographic area, taking in material from the town of Queensbury (six of its seven districts), as well as the Village of South Glens Falls, including the business centerpiece, Moreau Industrial Park.

But, because they were aggressive in reaching out to businesses throughout the region, they now also count many of them as customers. 

“We’ve had success in some unlikely places,” says, Vilander. “Most of our liquid sludge, for example, comes out of Vermont. That includes some of the larger ski resorts as well as many of the treatment plants from other towns and villages—plants that don’t have drying beds or digesters or any other means to take product through the final steps needed for it to be safe for disposal. So we provide that last step for them.”

Volumes are also supplemented by outside cake haulers, including regional correctional facilities such as Comstock Prison and the Washington County (VT) jail.

“These facilities all have their own wastewater treatment systems, complete with belt presses, which allows them to generate a cake. But that’s as far as they can go with it. So, twice or three times a week, they send us five tons of cake in a single-axle dump truck, and dump it onto a pad. We then use a pay loader to load that cake into a receiving station where it is stored until we have the time and manpower to incinerate it,” he adds.

Three Decades of Sludge

The benefits gained by reaching out for additional material would be a moot point were Glens Falls unable to effectively incinerate what it collects. Vilander says the equipment in place in many parts of the facility has amazed him in both its capability and its longevity.

“A good case in point would be our sludge pumps,” he says. “We had a pair of Schwing KSP-5 sludge pumps that were installed during that first plant upgrade in the 1980s. Those pumps—which were among the first made by Schwing for this market—have been outstanding for us, given what they’re asked to do. They were replaced just a couple years ago after nearly three decades of pumping. And mind you, they were replaced not because of wear issues, but because our volumes had grown so much over the years that we needed to upsize.”

He adds that the pumps’ impressive performance is made even more so given the fact that one of the critical steps in their routine maintenance was often overlooked for being “too inconvenient.”

“I’ve always felt that keeping the water in a pump’s water box clean is second only to keeping the hydraulic fluid clean,” he says. “Unfortunately for us, in the prior expansion, a grate, which allowed personnel to walk around the belt presses, was installed right over the top of the pumps’ water boxes, making access difficult. As a result, the water was changed far too infrequently. I’m still amazed at how well those pumps worked—and how long they performed for us—even with that lapse in an important operating procedure.”

With This Ring

Schwing Bioset Sludge Piston Pump at WWTP

With the upsizing to a larger pair of sludge pumps (Schwing KSP-10s), Glens Falls has increased their pumping capability to deal with the growth in biosolids handling at the plant. The new pumps take cake that has been dewatered to about 24%-26% solids and route it for incineration where a 32-ton load of cake (an 18-wheeler full) can be reduced to 100 pounds of ash. Moving that high solids content says Vilander, is helped by the addition of a “slip ring,” or pipeline lubrication system, a feature that injects a thin film of water to reduce friction loss in the pipeline and lower pipeline operating pressures—in some cases by more than 50%.

“We work so hard to get all the water out, so it seems a bit contradictory to be putting some back in," he says. "But, because we’re running these slip rings at about 20-30% of their capacity and they come on for only a matter of seconds, we are adding no more than three gallons per hour. So the amount of water added is minimal and pales by comparison to the improvement in throughput and the fuel savings we achieve with the drier sludge cake,” stated Vilander.

Additional benefits provided by the newer pumps include a much greater degree of versatility. Because the pumps are PLC-controlled, Vilander and his crew are able to have them run in several different modes including: “pressure,” tracking” or “manual.” That means they now have the capability to automatically control the speed of the hopper screws and the pump itself.

“With the old pumps, we could adjust our pressures a bit to get the speed we needed, but we couldn’t get independent control of both components—the screws and the pump, says Vilander. "Now we can and it’s made a huge difference. Because the pumps run nice and slow—and quiet— I’m not even seeing the level of maintenance that I had with the old ones. I can see these outlasting even those previous workhorses,” said Vilander.

Grease is the Word

The ultimate destination for all the cake processed through Glens Falls is a fluid bed incinerator which 18’ 3” in diameter with a height of 44’ 9”. The unit is designed to maintain an effective operating temperature of 1500°F and uses the cake itself as the primary fuel source. According to Vilander, if the cake is dry enough, it will reach an autogenous state and burn without an additional fuel source.

“However, if it’s too wet, or does not have enough VOC in it, we have to add BTUs through an alternative heat source which, in the past, was fuel oil. While the new belt presses gave us a much drier cake, we still found ourselves having to rely upon the fuel oil and the costs associated with it. As part of an overall cost savings move, we installed a two part grease system consisting of a concentrator and a storage tank,” said Vilander.

Doing so not only dramatically reduced the operational costs at Glens Falls; it also gave area businesses a way to efficiently dispose of grease from their operations. Now, the septage haulers simply bring the grease to the plant, pay a disposal fee and it gets concentrated, thickened and burned.

“Occasionally we will get a load of grease with wastewater added to it which has to be treated differently. So it goes into our storage tank where it is mixed and pumped up to our belt presses, combined with the cake and moved—once again using the Schwing pumps—out to incineration. The grease, which was once a waste product, is now both a fuel source and a small revenue stream,” said Vilander.

Better in the Long Run

If it sounds as though Vilander is a proponent of piston-style pumps versus their progressive cavity (PC) counterparts, it’s because he is, and that feeling is based on experience he’s gained at Glens Falls.

“We had an emergency situation arise a while back in which the incinerator was down and we had to take some steps to effectively store the cake until it was back online. We stockpiled it onsite but then had to find a way to re-introduce it into the system when we were up and running. So we teamed up a conveyor and a PC pump as sort of a makeshift solution. That experience taught me that, while PC pumps are certainly a lot less expensive; they do not handle grit at all and, given what we went through then, won’t last nearly as long,” said Vilander. He adds that they’ve never done a study to determine the total life cycle ownership/operation cost of their piston pumps versus that PC unit, but says he wouldn’t be surprised at all to find it costs more to run the PC pump.

“Our piston-style pumps were more expensive up front but we know they will provide decades of good service. I think we’ve already proven that,” said Vilander.

 

To download the entire #15 application report for Glens Falls, NY, click here.

To learn more about Schwing Bioset, our products and engineering, or this project specifically, please call 715-247-3433, email marketing@schwingbioset.com, view our website, or find us on social media.

To view a version of this story published in TPO Magazine, click here.

 

Tags: Sludge Pumps, Piston Pumps, Wastewater Treatment, Pumps, Dewatered Sludge Cake

Upgrading a Reliable Necessity - Piston Pumps at the Greeley WWTP

 

Written by Joshua DiValentino, December 2, 2015

The City of Greeley, Colorado, wastewater treatment facility recently implemented a series of strategic upgrades and major improvements were made to the Biosolids Facility. The Greeley facility repurposes its dewatered biosolids cake by trucking it for land application into remote Northern Colorado. The existing Schwing Bioset piston pump located in the sludge dewatering building had been in operation for 20 years and was a key component of this process.

The Greeley facility had relied on its sole Schwing Bioset KSP 25 cake pump for two decades prior to the upgrades. During that time, the existing pump was the only means of transportation for dewatered biosolids between the centrifuge dewatering equipment and the truck loading bin. The piston pump could have been a “bottle-neck” for a facility with limited storage capacity. However, the existing pump provided an exceptionally high level of uptime over its operational life at Greeley, with minimal wear part consumption.   

By 2014-15 the sole KSP 25 had been in operation since the mid 90’s. The City of Greeley facility, working on a larger plant upgrade, decided to implement a new pumping system for the coming decades. Greeley once again chose to invest in a Schwing Bioset KSP Piston pump.

In order to be as cost effective as possible, but also provide maximum redundancy for the foreseeable future, Greeley chose to purchase a new KSP 25, as well as upgrade the existing KSP unit to modern standards. The existing pump was upgraded to match the new KSP unit with control modifications, and upgraded safety features offer easier remote operation and even longer wear part life. The existing unit was also outfitted with a new Hydraulic Power Unit, offering modern hydraulic feed pumps and unlimited control variability.  The two pumps provide redundancy and additional capacity for growth, as well as a modern control network with the current plant SCADA.

Schwing Bioset KSP Municipal Piston Pump  Schwing Bioset Hydraulic Power Pack

The new pump system included a Hydraulic Power Pack, a Twin Screw Feeder, the Control Panel, and of course the Piston Pump. The Schwing Bioset services team worked with the installing contractor and Greeley personnel to integrate the updated control system features on both pumps with the plant MCC.  The new Schwing Bioset KSP cake pumping system (complete with two fully-operational pumps) was turned over to the City of Greeley in the fall of 2015.       

To learn more about this project specifically or learn more about our pumps, please contact this blog’s author, Josh DiValentino, call 715.247.3433, and/or visit our website here: SBI Municipal Pumps.

 

Tags: Piston Pumps, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Pumps, Municipal Pumps