News from Schwing Bioset

How Transitioning to Class A Biosolids Saves Money

 

Published in TPO Magazine, February 2016. Written by Larry Trojak.

 

A southwest Florida treatment plant turns to lime stabilization to create Class A biosolids for land application and cuts handling costs significantly.

Cost-effective handling of biosolids is essential to clean-water plants’ economic and environmental performance.

The Immokalee Water and Sewer District in Florida faced a biosolids challenge in 2006. The district had been using drying beds to create Class B biosolids and spending about $500,000 a year to dewater and haul excess material from that process to a landfill.

Facing a change in regulations on land application of Class B material, and wanting to reach the biosolids’ full economic potential, the district looked at alternatives. The ultimate solution was a facility redesign centered on using the Bioset process (Schwing Bioset) to create Class A biosolids. As a result, the district has reduced handling costs by more than two-thirds and produces a Class A product for beneficial use.

Anticipating change

Located about 30 miles southeast of Fort Myers, the heavily agricultural Immokalee district is home to about 24,000 residents. Its wastewater treatment plant was expanded in 2013 from 2.5 mgd to 4.0 mgd design capacity. Until fairly recently, it generated 23,500 gallons of Class B biosolids per day at 1 to 1.5 percent solids.

Gary Ferrante, P.E., an engineer with the Greeley and Hansen engineering firm, says a number of factors in 2006 led the district to review its biosolids operation. “Immokalee’s plant was originally designed with a half-dozen drying beds in which a Class B biosolids was created and used on permitted area farms,” he says.

“While that was effective, the facility is next to a school, which repeatedly complained about students’ health risks and odor. The district later learned that the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection were considering changes to biosolids land application regulations (passed in 2010 as Florida Biosolids Regulation Chapter 62-640 F.A.C.). All that prompted the district to hire a consultant to look at alternatives.”

Lots of options

Based on recommendations from the consultant’s report, in 2007 the district contracted with Synagro Technologies to dewater the Class B biosolids and haul it to a landfill more than 100 miles away. In time, rising prices and an increase in biosolids volume raised annual costs from $309,000 to more than $470,000, providing incentive for the district to pursue other options.

“Working with the district, we put together a couple of proposals and a couple of scenarios within each proposal,” says Ferrante. “The first one covered the design/build/finance of a biosolids facility at the existing location. Options under this plan included handling material from Immokalee only, as well as accepting material from Collier County and making Immokalee a regional processing facility. The second proposal had an outside entity leasing land from the district and constructing a Class A regional processing facility on it.”

An option under that proposal included a continuation of the contract dewatering program while the regional facility was taking shape. In the end, the district chose to establish a turnkey processing facility for its own biosolids sludge only and selected the Bioset process to deliver Class A material.

Schwing Bioset - Bioset Process  Schwing Bioset - Bioset Process

Class A operation

At the new facility, material exits the primary treatment facility’s sludge holding tanks at 1.5 percent solids and is fed directly to a high-performance screw press, selected for a number of reasons, including its relatively compact design.

“Because of the limited availability of usable land, a small footprint for the entire biosolids system was a major consideration, and the Bioset screw press fit in nicely,” Ferrante says. “We’ve found it to be an outstanding dewatering tool, yet extremely efficient in power usage.

“The belt press we looked at would have taken the material from 1.5 or 2 percent solids up to 8 to 10 percent. A centrifuge might get that up to 20 percent, but the electricity costs would be much higher. The screw press takes the material up to 16 percent solids. It uses twin augers and a changing pitch on the screws to advance the material and remove the water. Because it takes far less energy to turn those two screws than to power a centrifuge, the savings in power consumption can be significant.”

Another feature is that district personnel can wash the screw press down while it remains operational, says Michael Castilla, service technician 1: “The Bioset screw press has an automated self-cleaning function which in itself is nice. However, when we have a situation that calls for additional cleaning, we can simply push a button and a cleaning cycle will start. That’s a bonus. To shut a press down for maintenance or repair could cost us a half-day’s performance.”

Positive reaction

After dewatering, untreated biosolids are taken via screw conveyor to a twin-screw mixer in which quicklime and sulfamic acid are added. The mixing resolves issues such as unreacted lime in the final product and yields a highly homogeneous material. From the mixer, a Schwing Bioset KSP-10HKR pump feeds material into a 56 1/2-cubic-foot reactor in which heat from the acid and quicklime reaction raises the pH, stabilizing the mixture and creating a product that meets both Florida Chapter 503.33 and U.S. EPA Class A requirements.

“Retention time in the reactor is about 30 to 45 minutes at temperatures in the range of 122 degrees Fahrenheit,” says Ferrante. “The plant wastes sludge for 16 hours a day, consistently generating about­­­­­ 11 dry tons of the Class A material weekly and doing so at a markedly lower cost than for outright hauling and landfilling.”
Castilla adds that the system’s ease of operation was also key to getting up to speed quickly.

“It is very intuitive and simple to operate,” he says. “However, Schwing Bioset still went to great lengths to ensure that people involved in day-to-day operation are comfortable with it, have a handle on the maintenance routines, and so on. Ian Keyes from their Wisconsin office spent time here mentoring me to such a degree that there’s very little about the system I don’t understand.”

The Class A material exits the system, is loaded onto a manure spreader and taken to an area field where it is applied in place of fertilizer. Eliminating those fertilizer costs alone has saved about $50,000 per year.

In addition to lower costs, the district benefits from a much cleaner, less maintenance-intensive, more environmentally friendly operation. Dust from the lime-based process is controlled using hard-piped or totally enclosed components. Odorous air is contained by the pressurized reactor and then captured and scrubbed under a collection hood before release.

Schwing Bioset - Biosolids Hauling    Schwing Bioset - Biosolids Hauling

Room to grow

The district’s biosolids plant was designed with ample space to install a second identical processing line in case the regional concept becomes a reality. “One of the most important aspects of this system is its ability to accommodate the changes a regional operation would entail,” says Ferrante. “Things like fluctuations in the percentage of solids, increases and decreases in throughput, and compatibility with biosolids from aerobic or anaerobic digestion processes without modification, are all within its design capability.

“Simply put, the district is well positioned to have its wastewater treatment needs met for the foreseeable future. After the $2 million design/build/finance contract was awarded, the district, seeing itself in a good financial position, opted to pay that cost out of pocket, rather than financing it over 20 years.”

The annual operating cost for the new system is about $130,000 a year, including chemicals and electricity. With estimated savings of $370,000 per year over landfilling, the system will pay for itself by about mid-2019.

“This was a case in which Immokalee, a small independent special district with a serious financial headache, took real initiative in getting things done,” says Ferrante. “They will be the beneficiaries of those sound decisions for decades to come.”

 

To view this story on TPO Magazine's website, click here.

To learn more about Schwing Bioset and the Bioset Process, click here.

 

 

Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Piston Pumps, Bioset System, Wastewater Treatment, Fertilizer, Screw Press

When WWTP Says "No Tanks," Innovative Bioset Process Fills the Gap

 

Schwing Bioset Application Report 17, St. Petersburg, Florida

Written by Larry Trojak, Trojak Communications

Version also published in WE&T Magazine, November 2013

 

Pumps_Snapshot

 

Wear is the unflagging enemy of every wastewater treatment plant. Plant operators can defend against it to the best of their ability; but in the end, time will win out, resulting in breakdowns and the occasional interruption in service. To cope with such occurrences, forward-thinking plants will always have a solid contingency plan in place. For the Southwest Water Reclamation Facility (WRF) serving the Water Resources Department’s southwest sector (including St. Petersburg, FL), their contingency - designed to deal with a pair of worn, aging digester tanks - involved bypassing the tanks entirely and processing biosolids through a Bioset sludge treatment process. Doing so is not only helping them avoid an operational nightmare and additional maintenance and expense, it is allowing them to improve the by-product of that biosolids operation - all at a time when costs to land-apply their “standard” product have skyrocketed. Timing, it seems, really is everything.

 

Decades of Wear

Originally built in 1955 as a four million gallon per day (mgd) facility, the Southwest Water Reclamation Facility (WRF) was literally replaced at the same location with a 20 mgd plant in 1978. It is one of four which serve the greater St. Petersburg area: Plant #1, for the southeast section of the area which includes downtown St. Petersburg; Plant #2, to serve the northeast section of town; Plant #3, for the northwest section of the area and the beach communities; and Plant #4, for the southwest section of St. Petersburg, as well as the incorporated towns of Tierra Verde and Gulf Port. According to Ken Wise, chief plant operator for the Southwest WRF, volumes at each plant are pretty much equal.

“Plant #1 is called the Albert Whitted WRF and it’s a little smaller since there are fewer residents downtown than in other parts of the city,” he says. “But each of the other three plants are 20 mgd facilities and treat roughly the same amount of sewage. Since the upgrade in 1978 we’ve all been running an anaerobic digestion process and creating a Class B product from the biosolids. For us, that approach worked well until time caught up with us in the form of badly-worn digester tanks which were causing odor issues for an adjacent college and residential developments in the area.”

Given that two of the tanks were built in 1955 with the original plant, and the third was added with the expansion more than 35 years ago, the wear factor is not surprising. Wise says other plants in the area were also seeing failures in both the covers and in their structures as a whole.

“We hadn’t had a failure yet, but the Water Resources Department was spending a good deal of money on
upkeep with us,” says Wise. “Under normal circumstances that would have probably sufficed and bought us a few more years. However, due to changing Florida regulations surrounding the land application practices of the Class B biosolids they were producing at the time, the department started seriously looking into alternative biosolids treatment technologies hoping to avoid repairing something that was not only at the end of its life, but also might not be a fit for that new effort.”

 

Repeat Success

Bioset_Snapshot

To find that solution, the department looked at all possible alternatives, an initiative that included conducting pilot projects with various technologies at other locations in the city. One of those, at the Whitted plant, involved installing the Bioset Process sludge treatment system which uses a combination of pH and heat to stabilize the biosolids, thereby eliminating the need for digesters. 

In addition to being extremely low maintenance and operator friendly, Wise says that it had proven quick to implement and very successful there. “Ultimately the decision was made to install another system from Schwing Bioset here at Southwest,” he says. “Installation took place in July of last year (2012) and we were online by August.”

The installation, he adds, went smoothly, despite the fact that the Bioset Process had to be made to fit within the confines of an existing section of the plant rather than in a totally new site.

“The Bioset crew really worked with us to maximize use of the space we had and minimize disruption,” he says. “As a result, we probably have one of the few Bioset systems in which the reactor is raised some ten feet off the floor to fit with an existing opening. Now, sludge comes off the belt presses, is mixed with quicklime and sulfamic acid, and is pumped up into the reactor, where it spends at least 40 minutes at 135°F and achieves a pH of 12.5, before being discharged to the trailers.”

The newly-stabilized sludge is kept in the trailers on-site for 24 hours, at which point a sample is taken to ensure the pH is still in excess of 11.5 as required by Federal regulations. Since going online with the Bioset Process, Wise says the pH has never been less than 12.5.

 

Added Benefits

In addition to the elimination of virtually any odor and the complaints associated with it, it is the end product of the Bioset process - now a Class AA biosolid (the Florida equivalent of Class A-EQ) - which is the real benefit for Wise and his operation.

“In the past, our Class B material was suitable for use on sod farms and pasture lands, but because of its designation would have to be set back from any kind of food crops. By contrast, the Class AA product we get off the Bioset Process can be applied on golf courses, pastures, food crops - pretty much anywhere. In addition, because of a recent change in regulations, the other three area plants still generating the Class B biosolid are now paying an extra $300 more per trailer, while our costs dropped $100 per load. Granted, by adding the lime, the volumes are up about 10%, so the number of trailers we are shipping has increased. But even with that added into the equation, we are still saving 40 percent when compared to the Class B and have a much more usable product,” says Wise.

All of the Class AA material generated at the plant is currently either land applied at a site within an hour of the plant or sold as fertilizer to the local agricultural market. The previous Class B, by comparison, was hauled to sites more than three-hours away where it often found limited use.

 

Tanks for the Memories

The St. Petersburg WWTP has proven to be something of a case study in how to best deal with a set of unfortunate, challenging circumstances. Faced with a pair of failing digesters that were going to require a significant investment to rebuild, and which were creating odor issues for nearby residents, businesses, and students - the plant was able to solve the problems by abandoning the existing tanks and by adopting new technology in their operation. That solution from Schwing Bioset was implemented for less money than the tank rebuild project would have cost, it eliminated the odor issue, and includes the added benefit of processing cake directly to a Class AA biosolid (and gain more flexibility in the beneficial reuse of the end product), resulting in substantial net savings across the board.

"Since bringing in the Bioset System things have definitely settled down around here,” said Wise. “It’s been a great solution for us.” And, it would seem, all the issues created by the failing tanks are just fading memories.

 

To download the entire #17 application report for St. Petersburg, Florida, click here.

To learn more about Schwing Bioset, our products and engineering, or this project specifically, please call 715-247-3433, email marketing@schwingbioset.com, view our website, or find us on social media.

To view a version of this story published in WE&T Magazine, click here.

 

Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Bioset System, Beneficial Reuse, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Fertilizer

Schwing Bioset, Inc. Expands its Leadership Position as the Class A/AA Biosolids Solution Provider

 

Published on April 14, 2015 (Somerset, WI)

Schwing Bioset, Inc. has completed another successful Beneficial Reuse installation.  The City of Immokalee, Florida, chose Schwing Bioset to provide not only its Best in Class equipment, but design and build capabilities as well.

The heart of the system is the patented Bioset process and reactor that converts raw sludge into Class AA Biosolids, making it ready for easy land application.  Licensed as a fertilizer in the state of Florida, the Class AA product produced by the Bioset process is a highly marketable and sought after product.  Millions of tons have been produced and beneficially reused by the Bioset process. 

Taking advantage of some of the other high quality products Schwing Bioset offers, Immokalee integrated their Twin Piston Pump and Dewatering Screw Press into their design.

The Immokalee Water & Sewer District Executive Director, Eva Deyo, is very pleased with the system.  “The project came in under budget and went from concept to completion much quicker than other options.  As promised, the Schwing Bioset solution has proven to be easy to operate for our staff and very cost effective to operate, and the end product is exceptional,” said Deyo.  

Schwing Bioset Regional Sales Manager, Tom Welch, is thrilled with the results of the project.  “The City of Immokalee was tremendous to work with throughout the entire process.  Their vision and understanding of the value that the Schwing Bioset solution offered was evident throughout.  They realized after investigating numerous options that you don’t have to break the bank to get state-of-the-art technology,” said Welch.

“The experience of our Design, Engineering, and Project Management Teams has really shown during the execution of this fast track project.  The Schwing Bioset Team has executed on well over $150M in projects, with 2015 proving to be our biggest year ever,” said Tom Anderson, Owner and President of Schwing Bioset.

About Schwing Bioset

For more than 25 years, Schwing Bioset has been helping wastewater treatment plants, mines, and power generation customers by engineering material handling solutions. Schwing Bioset’s custom engineered solutions can be found in hundreds of wastewater treatment plants in North America as well as mines and tunnels around the world.

For questions or more information, please contact Schwing Bioset at 715-247-3433 or marketing@schwingbioset.com, or visit the website at http://www.schwingbioset.com.

SBI Logo Small resized 600

Tags: Bioset Process, Piston Pumps, Municipal Biosolids, Beneficial Reuse, Class 'AA' Biosolids, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Fertilizer, Recycled Waste, Schwing Bioset, Municipal, Screw Press

Schwing Bioset and Biosolids Distribution Services Open First Owned and Operated Regional Class AA/EQ Bioset Facility

Posted on August 28, 2013
The recently opened BDS and Schwing Bioset Regional Class AA/EQ Bioset facility receives outside sludge for treatment to Class AA/EQ on a pay-per-ton basis.

 

Ft. Meade, FL – Florida’s revised wastewater residuals regulations (F.A.C. 62-640) affect and limit the disposal options for municipalities producing biosolids. In response to the changing regulations, Schwing Bioset and BDS decided that the time was right to open a regional bioset facility that would accept outside biosolids and turn them into a Class AA/EQ material that has a wider array of beneficial reuse applications.

"Up till now, municipalities really only had one option when it came to biosolids. We saw this as great opportunity to innovate; an opportunity to break the mold and offer our clients with an alternative. In the most basic terms, our regional Class AA/EQ bioset facility allows wastewater treatment facilities to pay for biosolids processing without any capital outlay," stated Dan Anderson, General Manager of Biosolids Distribution Services.

The BDS regional Class AA/EQ bioset facility, located in Ft. Meade, Florida, accepts three primary types of material: cake sludge, septage and liquid sludge, and treats these materials using the patented Bioset process (liquid sludge and septage are dewatered before treated) which produces material that meets the highest quality standards set by the EPA, Class AA/EQ. Class AA/EQ material is exceptional quality and can be used as a fertilizer supplement or soil amendment.

"With significant advantages over other fertilizer products, the Class AA/EQ material created by the patented Bioset process is safe to be used as a fertilizer the next day," stated Anderson.

Florida’s revised regulations create challenges for any wastewater treatment facility whose biosolids do not meet Class A standards. Schwing Bioset and BDS are proud to offer these facilities with an alternative that is convenient and affordable and produces a sustainable end product for better reuse.

>>Read the article on PRWeb

Tags: Biosolids Processing, Bioset Process, Beneficial Reuse, Class 'AA' Biosolids, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Biosolids, Fertilizer, Biosolids Handling

Field Storage of Biosolids

Now that you’ve implemented your process (perhaps the Bioset Process?) for turning sludge into Class A biosolids, you’re probably faced with a new concern: what to do with all this high-quality fertilizer? If you’re providing it to farmers or citizens for land application, it might go out fast enough during some seasons of the year, but municipalities are generating wastewater year-round, even if the ground is frozen or fallow. The EPA provides guidelines for biosolid storage. Some of the primary concerns are:

  • Site Selection Considerations
  • Field Storage: Stockpiles
  • Field Storage: Constructed Facilities
  • Odor Prevention and Mitigation
  • Spill Prevention and Response
For site selection, you’ll want to consider some key factors:
  • Climate: How will weather affect the location? Do the prevailing winds blow odor toward a community? In many areas of the United States, land application of biosolids is severely limited from November through March.
  • Topography: Is the location regularly inundated by water or in a wetlands? Is it fairly level? Stockpiles should be near the top of slopes to minimize exposure to up-slope runoff. Storm water controls may be necessary. Storage locations should be in areas with adequate buffers.
  • Soil/Geology: Sites should not be located on excessively moist or wetland soils that regularly have standing water or excessive runoff after storms, or areas with loose soils (gravel or sand) that permit excessive infiltration.
  • Buffer Zones: Sites must comply with any federal (10 meters by the 503 rule), state, or local regulations regarding minimum buffer distances to waterways, homes, wells, property lines, roads, etc.
  • Odor Prevention/Aesthetics: Try to minimize visual and odor impact on residential areas. Storage during the summer poses a greater potential for development of unacceptable odors and requires a higher level of management.
  • Accessibility and Hauling Distance: How far do you have to haul sludge and/or biosolids? What’s the accessibility of the site during bad weather, or heavy traffic? Take note of weight restriction and other roadway limits along the haul route. Consider the traffic impact as well.
  • Property Issues: Ensure local zoning requirements and ordinances are met, and consider the relative security and liability associated with leasing versus ownership of the land. Any leases should extend for several years and preferably over the expected life of the facility.

Schwing Bioset’s advanced processing technology can help you understand and meet these requirements. To learn more, contact Schwing Bioset.

revinu fertilizer

Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Fertilizer

Feeling Green: Biosolids 101

Can you imagine living in a world where all of our raw sewage is dumped directly into rivers, lakes, or bays? What would that mean for your next fishing trip, your next family vacation to the ocean, or your next hot summer day spent splashing around in the local lake or creek?

Many of us don’t need to use much imagination to picture this scenario, because it wasn’t so very long ago that this careless sewage dumping happened in thousands of cities across America. According to the EPA, it was just thirty years ago that sewage made a one-way, non-stop trip to the water surrounding us.

My, how far we’ve come.

Today, thanks to vast improvements in wastewater treatment processes, American waterways are no longer the dumping grounds that they once were. Advanced wastewater treatment makes our waterways more hospitable to swimmers (both human and aquatic), and it also produces one very green side effect: biosolids.

As defined by the EPA, biosolids are “the nutrient-rich organic materials resulting from the treatment of sewage sludge.”

Sewage sludge isn’t very useful on its own, but once it is turned into biosolids, its potential is nothing short of extraordinary. Biosolids can be recycled and turned into super-powered fertilizer, which can be applied to land used for growing food. Today, roughly half of biosolids produced in the United States are being applied to land to beneficially improve soils. That’s a lot of recycled waste!

The EPA uses strict criteria and guidelines to ensure that biosolids are used safely. Thanks to these regulations and reliable, efficient biosolid processing systems like the Schwing Bioset process, raw sewage can be part of the ever-increasing green movement. Who knew poo could be as trendy as a canvas grocery bag?

canvas grocery bag

Tags: Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Schwing Bioset Process, Fertilizer, Recycled Waste

The Biosolid Journey

Somewhere, perhaps not far from where you are, biosolids are enriching soil and improving the land. Much of the biosolids produced in the United States are used to beneficially improve farmland, and biosolid application isn’t necessarily limited to agricultural use. Biosolids meeting the EPA’s criteria can be beneficially applied to forest land, reclamation sites, golf courses, public parks, roadsides, plant nurseries, and, in some cases, lawns and home gardens.

So biosolids can end up just about anywhere—but how do they get there? Biosolids result from the treatment and processing of sewage sludge. Biosolid processing can be a relatively simple process, especially when the right treatment system is put to work. Schwing Bioset has the treatment process down to a science, and many wastewater treatment plants prefer the Bioset process for its ease of operation, lack of dust and odor, minimal maintenance requirements, and low cost.

Systems like the Bioset process are able to turn sewage sludge into biosolids that meet the EPA’s criteria for ‘Class A’ biosolids. Class A biosolids are safe for land application—even land that is used to grow food. Once the biosolids have been treated and processed, they are ready to be put to use, enriching soil with necessary nutrients.

Sometimes biosolids are sprayed onto soil surfaces, and they can be tilled or injected into the land. In a liquid state, biosolids can be applied using tractors, tank wagons, irrigation systems, or special application vehicles. As a matter of fact, biosolid land application doesn’t differ too much from the application of limestone, animal manure or commercial fertilizers (but thanks to the treatment from systems like the Bioset process, biosolids don’t smell like animal manure!).

biosolid fertilizer

All across America, soil is being conditioned and fertilized by biosolids that began as sewage sludge.

What does your town do with its sewage?

Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Schwing Bioset Process, Fertilizer, Sewage Sludge

Generating "Revinu"

Lime stabilization is a proven, EPA-approved method for treating sewage sludge. In the capable hands of Schwing Bioset, the technique of lime addition has gone from effective to exceptional.

Bioset's process optimizes the chemical requirements and system efficiencies of lime stabilization. The end product, called Revinu, is safe and has many uses including fertilizer and as a soil stabilizer. Revinu is inexpensive and reliable, and produces a readily usable and valuable Class AA product.

affordable fertilizer-Revinu

Compared to other methods of producing Class AA material, the Bioset process is affordable from both initial capital expenditures and ongoing operation and maintenance costs. The equipment is fully automated and requires very little operator time. As a Class AA biosolid, the end product can be widely used and handled without many of the restrictions imposed on a Class B product.

Revinu's nutrient composition is a strong selling point. First, Revinu's low phosphorus content means it can be applied in phosphorus-sensitive areas. Second, Revinu provides a slow-release alternative to commercial nitrogen, which gives consumers three times the amount of nitrogen breakdown for prolonged plant nutrition. Third, Revinu provides sufficient potassium-a nutrient that is often prohibitively expensive-to support root growth and proper seed germination for a fraction of the market price of potassium.

Finally, Revinu is made up of 35% to 55% organic humus. The humus in the material acts as a topsoil, replenishing the natural bacteria that are essential for optimal plant growth and root strength. Until Revinu arrived on the market, landowners were often unable to replace eroded topsoil due to the astronomical cost associated with the process. Revinu makes topsoil replenishment accessible and affordable.

In short, the Bioset process is the most versatile and attractive method for biosolids treatment on the market today.

Tags: Bioset Process, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Fertilizer, Lime Stabilization

Biosolids Yield Happy Farmers & Happy Crops

In order to maintain your health, your doctor might recommend that you take a multivitamin.Biosolids act like a multivitamin for agricultural crops-and the result would make any nutritionist smile.

happy crops

Biosolids, like the ones processed using Schwing Bioset's advanced technology, can be applied as fertilizer to fields used for raising crops. According to the EPA, agricultural use of biosolids that meet strict quality criteria and application rates has been shown to produce significant improvements in crop growth and yield.

Why do biosolids make a difference for crops?

  • Biosolids are chock full of essential nutrients. Nutrients found in biosolids, such as nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium and trace elements such as calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, sulfur and zinc, are all necessary elements for crop production and growth.
  • Rejuvenation. The use of biosolids replenishes the organic matter that exists naturally in soil, but gets depleted over time with repetitive planting and harvesting cycles.
  • Moisture management. The organic matter improves soil structure by increasing the soil's ability to absorb and store moisture.
  • Defense. The organic nitrogen and phosphorous found in biosolids are used very efficiently by crops because these plant nutrients are released slowly throughout the growing season. This enables the crop to absorb these nutrients as the crop grows. This efficiency lessens the likelihood of groundwater pollution of nitrogen and phosphorous.
  • Environmental Friendliness. The application of biosolids reduces the need for chemical fertilizers.
  • The Bottom Line. Biosolids benefit farmers by reducing production costs.

Happy farmers, happy crops, happy-and-healthy-consumers. To learn more about how the Schwing Bioset process makes these valuable biosolids possible, contact Schwing Bioset.

Tags: Biosolids, Schwing Bioset Process, Fertilizer