News from Schwing Bioset

Bioset Demo Confirms Direction for New Class A Biosolids Equipment at Russellville WWTP

 

Written by Lance Bartlett, Utility Engineering Manager for City Corporation and Tom Welch, Southeast Regional Sales Manager for Schwing Bioset, Inc.

April 25, 2016

 

In early 2015, City Corporation, the commission established by the City of Russellville to operate the municipal water system, completed a construction project to abandon existing fixed film treatment facilities and convert the wastewater treatment plant to a denitrifying activated sludge facility.  Activated sludge technologies produce more sludge than fixed film and initial calculations predicted an increase of 6 to 7 times the current production rate when operated at the design capacity of the facility.

City Corporation had processed sludge through aging aerobic digesters and produced a Class B biosolid under 40 CFR 503 that was then dewatered and land applied to three nearby fields.  Two of the three permitted fields were no longer available, leaving only 49 acres for use.  The increase of sludge production was predicted to require around 160 acres.

The expected increase in sludge production and lack of land available for land application prompted staff to explore options.  The alternatives explored included composting, additional aerobic digesters, dryers, and the Bioset process from Schwing Bioset, Inc. (SBI). The Bioset process was selected for piloting in February and March of 2015 due to its low cost, simple operation, and the high quality Class A product that it produces.  The lone concern was with respect to the increase in volume due to the addition of chemicals, and staff wanted to get the new process up and running to obtain empirical data on sludge volume.  The engineering firm performing the preliminary study had built in a large contingency due to not being familiar with the Bioset technology and the uncertainty in sludge volume, thus raising concerns that the Bioset technology would be the proper process for the future of the Russellville WWTP.  Ultimately the volumetric increase was less than 10%, and with the Class A designation the number of outlets and demand for the material exceeds production rates.

Russellville_Bioset_3.jpg Russellville WWTP_Bioset Process_Schwing Bioset

Following that successful pilot test, in April of 2015, Schwing Bioset agreed to continue to lease the pilot machine under a monthly contract basis for the sludge handling process.  By the fall, City Corporation had a good feel for their solids production and had a great experience with the Bioset full scale pilot equipment.  Given the years of struggling with the Class B sludge process, management and staff were very pleased with the Class A process and end product and the thought of returning to a Class B process was taken off the table. With all the uncertainty taken out of the equation, staff was ready to make a decision and chose to move forward with a permanent Bioset installation.  City Corporation and Schwing Bioset continue to operate under a contract that allows City Corporation to operate the pilot unit until the permanent unit is installed and operational.  This arrangement allows City Corporation to manage their sludge and operate the plant in accordance with the design parameters, keeping the facility in compliance with the ADEQ, which otherwise would not be possible.  The new facility is anticipated to be operational in mid-October 2016.  The current digester will only be used as a sludge holding tank, thus reducing the power consumption needed for complete aerobic digestion to meet Class B standards, and allowing just WAS sludge to be converted to Class A EQ fertilizer through the Bioset process.

To learn more about our Bioset process or this project specifically, contact this blog’s author, Tom Welch, and/or visit the SBI Bioset Process page. For other inquiries, call 715.247.3433, visit our website, or find us on social media.

Download Our  Bioset Process Brochure

 

Tags: Bioset Process, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Lime Stabilization, Bioset Demo

Screw Press and Bioset Demo Leads to Treatment Plant Expansion

 

Written by Tom Welch, September 10, 2015

The Springfield, IL, Metro Sanitary District (SMSD) Sugar Creek Plant is going to be expanding over the next two years.  They currently have no dewatering capability and they treat their liquid sludge with lime and liquid land-apply on their own fields onsite at the plant.  In June of 2013, Schwing Bioset was invited to run a dual demo of their screw press and Bioset systems.  The pilot study was conducted for two weeks where the Waste Activated Sludge (WAS) was dewatered with the screw presses and then converted to a Class A EQ product through the advanced alkaline stabilization Bioset process.  Crawford, Murphy, and Tilly Engineers coordinated the pilot study for the District.

Prior to the pilot study, the plant operations team was leaning toward using belt presses for their future dewatering needs.  They had familiarity with belt presses and they were concerned that screw press technology did not have the capability to meet their requirements of 2660 dry pounds per hour without having to install a large number of screw press machines.  They were basing their concerns on historical screw press throughput capability based on their market research.

Springfield_Demo_Image_1-1

(Pilot Study Setup at SMSD Sugar Creek Plant)

During the pilot study, the Schwing Bioset team brought their FSP 600 screw press machine to dewater the partially aerobically digested WAS.  The goal was to dewater the material to the highest percent solids, with an excellent capture rate, and also with the least amount of polymer consumption.  The dewatered product would then be passed along to the mobile Bioset operation, which is an advanced alkaline stabilization process that can produce a Class A EQ Biosolid end product that can be utilized as a fertilizer or a soil amendment. 

The first week of the demo was utilized to optimize the screw press performance, and the second week to monitor continued performance of the screw press while utilizing the Bioset operation to produce a Class A EQ product. The purpose of this was to monitor the product over a couple month period to determine the stability of the Class A EQ product at the Springfield plant.  Over the two weeks, the FSP 600 screw press unit produced a dewatered product of 30% solids on average, even while operating the machine at 130-150% of design throughput capability.  After polymer optimization, the end result was realized with 14 pounds of active polymer per ton and the capture rate was above 95% during the entire two week period.  During the second week of the pilot, the Bioset system was utilized the entire time and was successful in producing the Class A EQ product.

Based on the successful results of the pilot, SMSD gave Crawford, Murphy, and Tilly the direction to design the new biosolids handling facility to include two high-performance screw presses, each capable of dewatering 1330 dry pounds per hour.  Although they liked the simplicity of the Bioset Class A operation, they were uncertain if the need for Class A was justified for the new facility.  They settled on a Class B Bioset system that utilizes all of the components of the Class A design, except for the reactor.  Space was left in the building to install the reactor in the future should Class A become necessary.  The job bid in December of 2014 and Schwing Bioset received an order for the two high-performance screw presses and the Class B alkalization system in early 2015. 

These FSP 1102 screw presses showcase the capabilities of high-performance screw presses and offer larger plants an appealing alternative to traditional belt filter press or centrifuge dewatering.

To learn more about our screw presses, Bioset process, and/or this project specifically, contact a Schwing Bioset Regional Sales Manager, call 715.247.3433, email us, and/or visit our website here.

Springfield_Demo_Image_2-1

(Class A EQ product at 44% solids)

 

 

Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Alkaline Stabilization, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Screw Press, Dewatering

When WWTP Says "No Tanks," Innovative Bioset Process Fills the Gap

 

Schwing Bioset Application Report 17, St. Petersburg, Florida

Written by Larry Trojak, Trojak Communications

Version also published in WE&T Magazine, November 2013

 

Pumps_Snapshot

 

Wear is the unflagging enemy of every wastewater treatment plant. Plant operators can defend against it to the best of their ability; but in the end, time will win out, resulting in breakdowns and the occasional interruption in service. To cope with such occurrences, forward-thinking plants will always have a solid contingency plan in place. For the Southwest Water Reclamation Facility (WRF) serving the Water Resources Department’s southwest sector (including St. Petersburg, FL), their contingency - designed to deal with a pair of worn, aging digester tanks - involved bypassing the tanks entirely and processing biosolids through a Bioset sludge treatment process. Doing so is not only helping them avoid an operational nightmare and additional maintenance and expense, it is allowing them to improve the by-product of that biosolids operation - all at a time when costs to land-apply their “standard” product have skyrocketed. Timing, it seems, really is everything.

 

Decades of Wear

Originally built in 1955 as a four million gallon per day (mgd) facility, the Southwest Water Reclamation Facility (WRF) was literally replaced at the same location with a 20 mgd plant in 1978. It is one of four which serve the greater St. Petersburg area: Plant #1, for the southeast section of the area which includes downtown St. Petersburg; Plant #2, to serve the northeast section of town; Plant #3, for the northwest section of the area and the beach communities; and Plant #4, for the southwest section of St. Petersburg, as well as the incorporated towns of Tierra Verde and Gulf Port. According to Ken Wise, chief plant operator for the Southwest WRF, volumes at each plant are pretty much equal.

“Plant #1 is called the Albert Whitted WRF and it’s a little smaller since there are fewer residents downtown than in other parts of the city,” he says. “But each of the other three plants are 20 mgd facilities and treat roughly the same amount of sewage. Since the upgrade in 1978 we’ve all been running an anaerobic digestion process and creating a Class B product from the biosolids. For us, that approach worked well until time caught up with us in the form of badly-worn digester tanks which were causing odor issues for an adjacent college and residential developments in the area.”

Given that two of the tanks were built in 1955 with the original plant, and the third was added with the expansion more than 35 years ago, the wear factor is not surprising. Wise says other plants in the area were also seeing failures in both the covers and in their structures as a whole.

“We hadn’t had a failure yet, but the Water Resources Department was spending a good deal of money on
upkeep with us,” says Wise. “Under normal circumstances that would have probably sufficed and bought us a few more years. However, due to changing Florida regulations surrounding the land application practices of the Class B biosolids they were producing at the time, the department started seriously looking into alternative biosolids treatment technologies hoping to avoid repairing something that was not only at the end of its life, but also might not be a fit for that new effort.”

 

Repeat Success

Bioset_Snapshot

To find that solution, the department looked at all possible alternatives, an initiative that included conducting pilot projects with various technologies at other locations in the city. One of those, at the Whitted plant, involved installing the Bioset Process sludge treatment system which uses a combination of pH and heat to stabilize the biosolids, thereby eliminating the need for digesters. 

In addition to being extremely low maintenance and operator friendly, Wise says that it had proven quick to implement and very successful there. “Ultimately the decision was made to install another system from Schwing Bioset here at Southwest,” he says. “Installation took place in July of last year (2012) and we were online by August.”

The installation, he adds, went smoothly, despite the fact that the Bioset Process had to be made to fit within the confines of an existing section of the plant rather than in a totally new site.

“The Bioset crew really worked with us to maximize use of the space we had and minimize disruption,” he says. “As a result, we probably have one of the few Bioset systems in which the reactor is raised some ten feet off the floor to fit with an existing opening. Now, sludge comes off the belt presses, is mixed with quicklime and sulfamic acid, and is pumped up into the reactor, where it spends at least 40 minutes at 135°F and achieves a pH of 12.5, before being discharged to the trailers.”

The newly-stabilized sludge is kept in the trailers on-site for 24 hours, at which point a sample is taken to ensure the pH is still in excess of 11.5 as required by Federal regulations. Since going online with the Bioset Process, Wise says the pH has never been less than 12.5.

 

Added Benefits

In addition to the elimination of virtually any odor and the complaints associated with it, it is the end product of the Bioset process - now a Class AA biosolid (the Florida equivalent of Class A-EQ) - which is the real benefit for Wise and his operation.

“In the past, our Class B material was suitable for use on sod farms and pasture lands, but because of its designation would have to be set back from any kind of food crops. By contrast, the Class AA product we get off the Bioset Process can be applied on golf courses, pastures, food crops - pretty much anywhere. In addition, because of a recent change in regulations, the other three area plants still generating the Class B biosolid are now paying an extra $300 more per trailer, while our costs dropped $100 per load. Granted, by adding the lime, the volumes are up about 10%, so the number of trailers we are shipping has increased. But even with that added into the equation, we are still saving 40 percent when compared to the Class B and have a much more usable product,” says Wise.

All of the Class AA material generated at the plant is currently either land applied at a site within an hour of the plant or sold as fertilizer to the local agricultural market. The previous Class B, by comparison, was hauled to sites more than three-hours away where it often found limited use.

 

Tanks for the Memories

The St. Petersburg WWTP has proven to be something of a case study in how to best deal with a set of unfortunate, challenging circumstances. Faced with a pair of failing digesters that were going to require a significant investment to rebuild, and which were creating odor issues for nearby residents, businesses, and students - the plant was able to solve the problems by abandoning the existing tanks and by adopting new technology in their operation. That solution from Schwing Bioset was implemented for less money than the tank rebuild project would have cost, it eliminated the odor issue, and includes the added benefit of processing cake directly to a Class AA biosolid (and gain more flexibility in the beneficial reuse of the end product), resulting in substantial net savings across the board.

"Since bringing in the Bioset System things have definitely settled down around here,” said Wise. “It’s been a great solution for us.” And, it would seem, all the issues created by the failing tanks are just fading memories.

 

To download the entire #17 application report for St. Petersburg, Florida, click here.

To learn more about Schwing Bioset, our products and engineering, or this project specifically, please call 715-247-3433, email marketing@schwingbioset.com, view our website, or find us on social media.

To view a version of this story published in WE&T Magazine, click here.

 

Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Bioset System, Beneficial Reuse, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Fertilizer

Schwing Bioset and Biosolids Distribution Services Open First Owned and Operated Regional Class AA/EQ Bioset Facility

Posted on August 28, 2013
The recently opened BDS and Schwing Bioset Regional Class AA/EQ Bioset facility receives outside sludge for treatment to Class AA/EQ on a pay-per-ton basis.

 

Ft. Meade, FL – Florida’s revised wastewater residuals regulations (F.A.C. 62-640) affect and limit the disposal options for municipalities producing biosolids. In response to the changing regulations, Schwing Bioset and BDS decided that the time was right to open a regional bioset facility that would accept outside biosolids and turn them into a Class AA/EQ material that has a wider array of beneficial reuse applications.

"Up till now, municipalities really only had one option when it came to biosolids. We saw this as great opportunity to innovate; an opportunity to break the mold and offer our clients with an alternative. In the most basic terms, our regional Class AA/EQ bioset facility allows wastewater treatment facilities to pay for biosolids processing without any capital outlay," stated Dan Anderson, General Manager of Biosolids Distribution Services.

The BDS regional Class AA/EQ bioset facility, located in Ft. Meade, Florida, accepts three primary types of material: cake sludge, septage and liquid sludge, and treats these materials using the patented Bioset process (liquid sludge and septage are dewatered before treated) which produces material that meets the highest quality standards set by the EPA, Class AA/EQ. Class AA/EQ material is exceptional quality and can be used as a fertilizer supplement or soil amendment.

"With significant advantages over other fertilizer products, the Class AA/EQ material created by the patented Bioset process is safe to be used as a fertilizer the next day," stated Anderson.

Florida’s revised regulations create challenges for any wastewater treatment facility whose biosolids do not meet Class A standards. Schwing Bioset and BDS are proud to offer these facilities with an alternative that is convenient and affordable and produces a sustainable end product for better reuse.

>>Read the article on PRWeb

Tags: Biosolids Processing, Bioset Process, Beneficial Reuse, Class 'AA' Biosolids, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Biosolids, Fertilizer, Biosolids Handling

Generating "Revinu"

Lime stabilization is a proven, EPA-approved method for treating sewage sludge. In the capable hands of Schwing Bioset, the technique of lime addition has gone from effective to exceptional.

Bioset's process optimizes the chemical requirements and system efficiencies of lime stabilization. The end product, called Revinu, is safe and has many uses including fertilizer and as a soil stabilizer. Revinu is inexpensive and reliable, and produces a readily usable and valuable Class AA product.

affordable fertilizer-Revinu

Compared to other methods of producing Class AA material, the Bioset process is affordable from both initial capital expenditures and ongoing operation and maintenance costs. The equipment is fully automated and requires very little operator time. As a Class AA biosolid, the end product can be widely used and handled without many of the restrictions imposed on a Class B product.

Revinu's nutrient composition is a strong selling point. First, Revinu's low phosphorus content means it can be applied in phosphorus-sensitive areas. Second, Revinu provides a slow-release alternative to commercial nitrogen, which gives consumers three times the amount of nitrogen breakdown for prolonged plant nutrition. Third, Revinu provides sufficient potassium-a nutrient that is often prohibitively expensive-to support root growth and proper seed germination for a fraction of the market price of potassium.

Finally, Revinu is made up of 35% to 55% organic humus. The humus in the material acts as a topsoil, replenishing the natural bacteria that are essential for optimal plant growth and root strength. Until Revinu arrived on the market, landowners were often unable to replace eroded topsoil due to the astronomical cost associated with the process. Revinu makes topsoil replenishment accessible and affordable.

In short, the Bioset process is the most versatile and attractive method for biosolids treatment on the market today.

Tags: Bioset Process, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Fertilizer, Lime Stabilization