News from Schwing Bioset

Schwing Bioset and Biosolids Distribution Services Open First Owned and Operated Regional Class AA/EQ Bioset Facility

Posted on August 28, 2013
The recently opened BDS and Schwing Bioset Regional Class AA/EQ Bioset facility receives outside sludge for treatment to Class AA/EQ on a pay-per-ton basis.

 

Ft. Meade, FL – Florida’s revised wastewater residuals regulations (F.A.C. 62-640) affect and limit the disposal options for municipalities producing biosolids. In response to the changing regulations, Schwing Bioset and BDS decided that the time was right to open a regional bioset facility that would accept outside biosolids and turn them into a Class AA/EQ material that has a wider array of beneficial reuse applications.

"Up till now, municipalities really only had one option when it came to biosolids. We saw this as great opportunity to innovate; an opportunity to break the mold and offer our clients with an alternative. In the most basic terms, our regional Class AA/EQ bioset facility allows wastewater treatment facilities to pay for biosolids processing without any capital outlay," stated Dan Anderson, General Manager of Biosolids Distribution Services.

The BDS regional Class AA/EQ bioset facility, located in Ft. Meade, Florida, accepts three primary types of material: cake sludge, septage and liquid sludge, and treats these materials using the patented Bioset process (liquid sludge and septage are dewatered before treated) which produces material that meets the highest quality standards set by the EPA, Class AA/EQ. Class AA/EQ material is exceptional quality and can be used as a fertilizer supplement or soil amendment.

"With significant advantages over other fertilizer products, the Class AA/EQ material created by the patented Bioset process is safe to be used as a fertilizer the next day," stated Anderson.

Florida’s revised regulations create challenges for any wastewater treatment facility whose biosolids do not meet Class A standards. Schwing Bioset and BDS are proud to offer these facilities with an alternative that is convenient and affordable and produces a sustainable end product for better reuse.

>>Read the article on PRWeb

Tags: Biosolids Processing, Bioset Process, Beneficial Reuse, Class 'AA' Biosolids, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Biosolids, Fertilizer, Biosolids Handling

Screw Press Adds Dewatering to Schwing Bioset Capabilities

Schwing Bioset is proud to announce the addition of a screw press dewatering system to their family of products.

 

Somerset, WI (PRWEB) January 19, 2013

A natural progression enabling clients to work with one dynamic solution provider to solve their biosolids management issues, Schwing Bioset has added Screw Presses to their family of products enabling them to help clients from dewatering to biosolids disposal.

Schwing Bioset Screw Press Dewatering Systems offer the features you want and performance you can count on. From low power requirements and unattended operation to high solids and high capture rates Screw Presses provide exceptional performance at a fraction of the energy and maintenance costs of other technologies.

With eleven models, each built to the same exacting standards, Schwing Bioset offers the widest range of model sizes available and can offer its customers, unlike competing technologies, the same high level of performance from top to bottom in the product line.

With over 65 machines in service and the Schwing Bioset name standing behind the technology for on-going support, municipalities now have a new option to provide superior dewatering performance for their biosolids.

screw press dewatering system

Tags: Biosolids, Schwing Bioset, Screw Press, Dewatering

Schwing Bioset Secures Long-Term Trial with City of St. Petersburg

 

Posted on January 9, 2013

City of St. Petersburg upgrades biosolids treatment to Class AA/EQ using Schwing Bioset’s patented Bioset process. 

St. Petersburg, FL – Until recently, the city of St Petersburg, Florida’s Southwest Water Reclamation Facility relied solely on anaerobic digesters to stabilize their biosolids. However, the 20+ year old digesters had not only aged to a point of disrepair, but were beginning to cause odor complaints from the neighbors. Hence, the city felt the pressure to take corrective action quickly.

Not only would rehabilitating the existing digesters entail a sizeable expense, but in the end, the digesters would still only be producing a Class B product that needed to be hauled off to land sites. In the past this was not an issue, but the new F.A.C. 62-640 rule in Florida is going to make Class B biosolids harder to reuse in a beneficial manner.

Schwing Bioset brought in their mobile Bioset System to the St Petersburg facility in June of 2011 for a 5-day trial. Demonstrating their ability to use a natural process that eliminates pathogens by elevating pH and temperature, they proved their ability to create a Class AA/EQ product from the facility’s biosolids that would meet the 62-640 rule in Florida.

After successfully providing Class AA within 24 hours of setting up the equipment for the trial, the city engaged in an active discussion with Schwing Bioset to extend their trial to a full year. In this time, Schwing Bioset would be contracted to install all equipment, make sure operators were trained properly, and modify the city’s existing operation for a year-long period. Presently the equipment is operating successfully, the digesters are off line, the odor complaints have been eliminated, and the plant is producing Class AA/EQ biosolids that are being beneficially reused locally.

 class A for the price of class B

Tags: Bioset Process, Bioset System, Class 'AA' Biosolids, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment

Southerly sets the standard with solids disposal efforts

Problem Solvers (as seen on Wef.org)

Problem: Increased solids volume after construction project increased overall capacity.
Solution: Pumps and sliding frames enable cake disposal.

WEF
The Southerly Wastewater Treatment Plant, which serves most of the greater Columbus, Ohio, area, recently completed a 5-year, $350 million expansion. The expansion nearly tripled its peak capacity from 431,500 to 1.25 million m3/d (114 to 330 mgd). The plant has earned numerous awards for plant and employee performance, but its solids disposal program truly makes Southerly a standout.

Using a quartet of heavy-duty pumps and a number of sliding-frame components from Schwing Bioset Inc. (Somerset, Wis.), cake can either be routed directly to incineration or sent to a pair of storage silos. Once in the silos, the material is available for truck loading and transport, either to an existing composting operation or directly to the landfill.

Change they can use

Centrifuges installed several years before the expansion successfully handle the increased flows to the solids handling area, according to Jeff Hall, assistant plant manager.

“That upgrade was implemented both to replace aging equipment, as in the case of the centrifuges, and to add functionality to other areas, like the transportation of solids,” Hall said. “In the past, primary solids were gravity-thickened while older centrifuges thickened the waste activated sludge [WAS]. The new units now thicken both the primary solids and the WAS. This new approach boosts the solids content of the resulting dewatered cake to about 20% to 25%, a nice improvement over the 17% to 21% solids content with the older system.”

Additional changes included installation of new cake pumps, a pair of storage silos, and sliding frames at two points in the solids handling process.

The routes to disposal

Southerly’s pumps and silos assist in transporting cake to several disposal options. As material exits the centrifuges, it is routed to any of four KSP 45V(HD)L-SFMS pumps, which route it either directly to the incinerators or to storage silos.

“Even though incineration is the most efficient method of disposal, we still try to keep the compost operation fed with as much as it needs, since that is the better use of the product,” said Carmon Allen, solids supervisor 2 at Southerly. The solids pumps at Southerly are designed to generate a force sufficient to move cake the long distances needed for either incineration or storage. It is approximately 91 m (300 ft) to the multihearth incinerators, which have operating temperatures of 760°C (1400°F), and about 122 m (400 ft) to the storage silos, Allen said. Equipped with a solids-flow measuring system, the pumps are able to measure to within 5% the amount of solids that are pumped to the incinerator. This simplifies the plant’s U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reporting requirements for the incinerator.

“Material headed to the silos, however, has an additional challenge to overcome,” Allen said. Once it reaches the base of the silo, “the cake has to go straight up another 100 ft [30 m] to enter the top of the structures, so the force needed to do that is really pretty impressive. I don’t think any regular equipment would be up to a task like that; these are definitely the right pumps for the job.”

Giving it the slip

Despite maximum operating pressures of 7585 kPa (1100 lb/in.2) for each pump, the extended distances at Southerly prompted Schwing Bioset to make accommodations to help move the solids along. The company added a pipeline lubrication system with a 360-degree annular groove that evenly injects a thin film of water around the entire annulus of the pipe. The water separates viscous and sticky materials from the inner wall of the pipeline. This reduces friction loss in the pipeline and lowers pipeline operating pressures by as much as 50%. This lubrication also means less energy use to move the solids and less wear on parts.

Parts such as the pumping rams, poppet valve discs, and seats are lasting for 6 months, said Tom Thomas, maintenance supervisor 2 at Southerly. “That’s about 4000 hours of wear-part life, which is outstanding, given what they’re being asked to pump.”

Silo efficiency

Prior to the installation of its two silos, Southerly relied upon a smaller holding vessel, a belt-fed, hopper-equipped component that used a series of screws to load trucks sitting under the discharge chute. City officials say the new silos are larger — providing about 75% more capacity — as well as far more efficient.

The new silos can load a truck in 5 minutes instead of the 45 minutes that was required before. Because the city pays a contractor to haul biosolids, reducing loading times lowers overall hauling costs. Trucks now spend more time hauling and less time waiting to be loaded. This means more trucks are loaded per day at a lower cost.

Inside the sliding-frame silo, hydraulic cylinders move an elliptical frame across the silo floor. The frame’s action not only breaks any bridging that can occur above the extraction screw, but it also pushes and pulls material toward the silo center for discharge. The cake then is fed into a twin screw feeder for discharge into trucks.

“Each silo holds better than 1500 tons [1360 Mg] of cake, so even if one of the incinerators went down and there was an interruption in the trucking operation, we’d still have a nice short-term storage option while things get back up again,” Allen said. “It’s really all about flexibility, and these silos afford us that.”

Due to the sheer size of the silos, each is equipped with three extraction screw conveyors at the bottom, enabling the trucks to be evenly loaded without having to be moved back and forth.

The silos also include an odor- and splash-control shroud that minimizes the need for odor control in the truck-loading building, reduces the chance of material splatter during loading, and confines any splatter to the area immediately adjacent to the trucks.

After loading, the solids are hauled either to a landfill or the composting operation. “Today, we are reusing about one-third of the solids we handle through the composting operation,” Hall said. “We are generating revenue from a product that was once simply discarded. However, it is also a plus from an environmental perspective. Any time you can reuse something rather than just burying it or burning it, you are making a positive impact.”

©2012 Water Environment Federation. All rights reserved.

Tags: Piston Pumps, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment

USEPA PEC Committee Grants PFRP Approval to the Bioset System

The USEPA PEC Committee Grants Nationwide PFRP Approval to Schwing Bioset and Its Class 'A' Biosolids Process known as the Bioset System

After extensive testing and research, Schwing Bioset is proud to announce that the USEPA has given nationwide approval to the Bioset Process to reduce its operating temperatures from 70°C (158°F) to 55°C (131°F) as a Process to Further Reduce Pathogens (PFRP). Operating at 55°C (131°F) results in a greater than 20% reduction in operating costs for owners of the Bioset process.

Somerset, WI 2011

After extensive testing and research, Schwing Bioset is proud to announce that the USEPA has given nationwide approval to the Bioset Process to reduce its operating temperatures from 70°C (158°F) to 55°C (131°F) as a Process to Further Reduce Pathogens (PFRP). Operating at 55°C (131°F) results in a greater than 20% reduction in operating costs for owners of the Bioset process. Prior to receiving nationwide approval, site-specific approval at one site in Texas had been granted.

The Schwing Bioset Process is a technology that continuously converts municipal biosolids into a Class A/EQ saleable product in full compliance with 40 CFR Part 503 Rule. The process mixes dewatered biosolids with calcium oxide (quicklime) and sulfamic acid (solid granular acid) and continuously pumps it into a plug flow reactor. The Schwing Bioset Process currently meets Class ‘A’ standards via pasteurization at 70°C for 30 minutes, and vector attraction reduction by maintaining an elevated pH.

At the elevated pH levels, ammonium contained within the biosolids evolves as ammonia, and the ammonia is maintained in solution with the biosolids in the pressurized plug flow reactor. Miscible contact of the ammonia with the biosolids enhances pathogen destruction to Class A/EQ standards at lower temperatures. Mixing is accomplished with Schwing Bioset’s twin-screw feeder and the blended material is pumped into the plug flow reactor with Schwing Bioset’s twin- cylinder positive displacement piston pump.

The combination of high temperature, high pH and the biocidal effects of ammonia ensure that the biosolids are pathogen free in accordance with Class A/EQ requirements. The end product is characterized as a lime enhanced soil amendment and is a valuable product for numerous land application markets. Because the Calcium in the Class A/EQ end product is readily available, soil pH adjustment occurs in less than half the time of what typical agricultural lime products require. An additional benefit of the end product is that the high percentage of organic content (35-55%) returns organic material to depleted soils.

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Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Piston Pumps, Bioset System, Municipal Biosolids, Class 'A' Materials, Screw Feeders, Biosolids

SBI Installs New Beneficial Reuse Bioset System in Northern Minn.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Schwing Bioset Announces New Beneficial Reuse Bioset System Installation in Northern Minnesota

The Bioset System will enable the Coleraine/Bovey/Taconite Joint Wastewater Commission to produce a soil amendment that meets the USEPA Class 'A' standards year round

Itasca County, MN- In Q3 of 2009 Schwing Bioset was awarded the contract to provide a Bioset System to the Coleraine/Bovey/Taconite Joint Wastewater Commission. This system was the lowest cost when compared to other technologies, and it produces a USEPA Class ‘A’ end product, unlike the other technologies that produced a USEPA Class ‘B’ material. The installation was completed in Q2 of 2011 and is fully operational.

The existing digesters could not meet the USEPA Class B standards in the winter months so the Commission needed to find a solution. After a reasonable amount of due diligence, the Commission secured the services of a local consulting engineering firm to explore alternatives for meeting the USEPA standards year round.

The engineer was faced with several challenges as they began their investigation. The plant was small, processing 0.5 MGD, and most available technologies would not scale down well or work well with intermittent biosolids processing. Another challenge was related to protracted winters and the need to find a place to store Class ‘B’ materials until the ground thawed and the biosolids could be land applied on the Commissions’ hay fields.

After considering options of a new digester, retrofitting the existing digester with heat exchangers, and reed beds, ultimately the Bioset process, Schwing Bioset’s alkaline stabilization process, was selected as the best available technology to meet these challenges.

About Schwing Bioset

For more than 25 years, Schwing Bioset has been helping wastewater treatment plants, mines and power generation customers by engineering material handling solutions. Schwing Bioset’s custom engineered solutions can be found in hundreds of wastewater treatment plants in North America as well as mines and tunnels around the world.

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Tags: Biosolids Processing, Bioset Process, Alkaline Stabilization, Class 'A' Materials, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment

Field Storage of Biosolids

Now that you’ve implemented your process (perhaps the Bioset Process?) for turning sludge into Class A biosolids, you’re probably faced with a new concern: what to do with all this high-quality fertilizer? If you’re providing it to farmers or citizens for land application, it might go out fast enough during some seasons of the year, but municipalities are generating wastewater year-round, even if the ground is frozen or fallow. The EPA provides guidelines for biosolid storage. Some of the primary concerns are:

  • Site Selection Considerations
  • Field Storage: Stockpiles
  • Field Storage: Constructed Facilities
  • Odor Prevention and Mitigation
  • Spill Prevention and Response
For site selection, you’ll want to consider some key factors:
  • Climate: How will weather affect the location? Do the prevailing winds blow odor toward a community? In many areas of the United States, land application of biosolids is severely limited from November through March.
  • Topography: Is the location regularly inundated by water or in a wetlands? Is it fairly level? Stockpiles should be near the top of slopes to minimize exposure to up-slope runoff. Storm water controls may be necessary. Storage locations should be in areas with adequate buffers.
  • Soil/Geology: Sites should not be located on excessively moist or wetland soils that regularly have standing water or excessive runoff after storms, or areas with loose soils (gravel or sand) that permit excessive infiltration.
  • Buffer Zones: Sites must comply with any federal (10 meters by the 503 rule), state, or local regulations regarding minimum buffer distances to waterways, homes, wells, property lines, roads, etc.
  • Odor Prevention/Aesthetics: Try to minimize visual and odor impact on residential areas. Storage during the summer poses a greater potential for development of unacceptable odors and requires a higher level of management.
  • Accessibility and Hauling Distance: How far do you have to haul sludge and/or biosolids? What’s the accessibility of the site during bad weather, or heavy traffic? Take note of weight restriction and other roadway limits along the haul route. Consider the traffic impact as well.
  • Property Issues: Ensure local zoning requirements and ordinances are met, and consider the relative security and liability associated with leasing versus ownership of the land. Any leases should extend for several years and preferably over the expected life of the facility.

Schwing Bioset’s advanced processing technology can help you understand and meet these requirements. To learn more, contact Schwing Bioset.

revinu fertilizer

Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Fertilizer

Feeling Green: Biosolids 101

Can you imagine living in a world where all of our raw sewage is dumped directly into rivers, lakes, or bays? What would that mean for your next fishing trip, your next family vacation to the ocean, or your next hot summer day spent splashing around in the local lake or creek?

Many of us don’t need to use much imagination to picture this scenario, because it wasn’t so very long ago that this careless sewage dumping happened in thousands of cities across America. According to the EPA, it was just thirty years ago that sewage made a one-way, non-stop trip to the water surrounding us.

My, how far we’ve come.

Today, thanks to vast improvements in wastewater treatment processes, American waterways are no longer the dumping grounds that they once were. Advanced wastewater treatment makes our waterways more hospitable to swimmers (both human and aquatic), and it also produces one very green side effect: biosolids.

As defined by the EPA, biosolids are “the nutrient-rich organic materials resulting from the treatment of sewage sludge.”

Sewage sludge isn’t very useful on its own, but once it is turned into biosolids, its potential is nothing short of extraordinary. Biosolids can be recycled and turned into super-powered fertilizer, which can be applied to land used for growing food. Today, roughly half of biosolids produced in the United States are being applied to land to beneficially improve soils. That’s a lot of recycled waste!

The EPA uses strict criteria and guidelines to ensure that biosolids are used safely. Thanks to these regulations and reliable, efficient biosolid processing systems like the Schwing Bioset process, raw sewage can be part of the ever-increasing green movement. Who knew poo could be as trendy as a canvas grocery bag?

canvas grocery bag

Tags: Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Schwing Bioset Process, Fertilizer, Recycled Waste

Biosolid Land Application Requirements

biosolids1EPA Part 503rule lists four options for meeting pollutant, pathogen, and vector limits in biosolids that are applied to land:
  • Exceptional Quality (EQ)
  • Pollutant Concentration (PC)
  • Cumulative Pollutant Loading rate (CPLR)
  • Annual Pollutant Loading Rate (APLR)

Each option is equally protective of the public health and the environment, so EQ, PC, CPLR, and APLR biosolids used in accordance with the Part 503 rule are all equally safe. For a detailed discussion on these four options, the best bet is to refer to the EPA, but the table below gives a brief primer on each.

Option*

Pollutant Limits

Pathogen Requirements

Vector Attraction Reduction Requirements

Exceptional Quality (EQ) Biosolids

Bulk or bagged biosolids meet pollutant concentration limits

Any one of the Class A requirements listed here

Any one of options 1–8 listed here.

Pollutant Concentration (PC) Biosolids

Bulk biosolids meet pollutant concentration limits

Any one of the Class B requirements listed here

Any one of the ten options listed here.

Any one of the Class A requirements listed here

Option 9 or 10 listed here.

Cumulative Pollutant Loading rate (CPLR) Biosolids

Bulk biosolids applied subject to cumulative pollutant loading rate limits listed here

Any one of the Class A or Class B requirements listed here

Any one of the ten options listed here.

Annual Pollutant Loading Rate (APLR) Biosolids

Bagged biosolids applied subject to annual pollutant loading rate limits

Any one of the Class A requirements listed here

Any one of options 1–8 listed here.

* Each of these options requires that the biosolids meet ceiling concentrations for pollutants, monitoring requirements, and recordkeeping and reporting requirements. See the EPA’s Part 503 Rule, Chapter 2 [PDF] for more information.

Schwing Bioset’s advanced processing technology can help you understand and meet these requirements. To learn more, contact Schwing Bioset.

Tags: Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment

What's Your Vector?

Biosolids can attract “vectors,” which are basically any living carrier that transmits an infectious agent (think ticks, mosquitoes, fleas, some kinds of flies, etc.). Meeting EPA Part 503 standards for Class A or B biosolids of various types requires that the biosolid meets at least one (sometimes more) of the ten vector attraction reduction options listed below:

Option 1. Reduce the mass of volatile solids by a minimum of 38%.

Option 2. Demonstrate vector attraction reduction with additional anaerobic digestion in a bench-scale unit.

Option 3. Demonstrate vector attraction reduction with additional aerobic digestion in a bench-scale unit.

Option 4. Meet a specific oxygen uptake rate for aerobically treated biosolids.

Option 5. Use aerobic processes at greater than 104°F (average temperatures 113°F) for 14 days or longer (e.g., during biosolids composting).

Option 6. Add alkaline materials to raise the pH under specified conditions.

Option 7. Reduce moisture content of biosolids that do not contain unstabilized solids from other than primary treatment to at least 75% solids.

Option 8. Reduce moisture content of biosolids with unstabilized solids to at least 90%.

Option 9. Inject biosolids beneath the soil surface within a specified time, depending on the level of pathogen treatment.

Option 10. Incorporate biosolids applied to or placed on the land surface within specified time periods after application to or placement on the land surface.

The Bioset process can help you achieve these options for your wastewater treatment. Contact Schwing Bioset for more information. For a more detailed explanation of these vector attraction reduction options, refer to the EPA’s Part 503 Rule, Chapter 5 [PDF].

vector

Tags: Sludge Pumps, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment