News from Schwing Bioset

Push Floor Bin and Biosolids Pumps Help Plant Stabilize Operations

 

Written by Chuck Wanstrom

The City of High Point, NC, was previously pumping biosolids to an incinerator using hydraulically actuated piston pumps supplied by another manufacturer. These pumps were aging and the city couldn’t reliably obtain spare parts to support their operation. Additionally, the wastewater treatment plant occasionally struggled with operations as it didn’t have any buffering capacity for the dewatered biosolids ahead of the piston pumps. In an effort to solve the support issues with the existing equipment and stabilize operations, the city solicited bids from consulting engineering firms to update and improve their process.

The selected engineer began surveying biosolids handling systems available in the market and with input from their Client, settled on a push floor storage bin and piston pump arrangement as offered by Schwing Bioset. With over 30-years of experience in biosolids storage and conveyance, and numerous successful installations to its credit, Schwing Bioset was the logical choice to provide the design and equipment for this retrofit application.

A new push floor bunker with 60 yards of storage capacity was supplied to handle the centrifuge dewatered biosolids. Directly coupled to the bottom of the new push floor bunker are two Schwing Bioset model SD 350 screw feeders and KSP 17 piston pumps. The piston pumps have a dual-discharges that allows the biosolids flow to be split and fed into the incinerator at a total of four injection points for more efficient incinerator operations as well. If the incinerator goes down, biosolids can also discharge to a new truck loading facility.

To learn more about our pumps and push floor bins, visit our Products page, Contact Us, visit our Website, or find us on social media.

 

High Point Piston Pumps  High Point Truck Loading

 

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Tags: Piston Pumps, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, hydraulic push floor bin

Southerly Sets The Standard with Sludge Disposal Efforts

 

Schwing Bioset Application Report 14, Columbus, Ohio

Written by Larry Trojak, Trojak Communications

Version also published in WE&T Magazine (click to view)

 

Pumps and sliding frames allow options for effective disposal of cake from Columbus, Ohio, operation.

Wastewater treatment plants can distinguish themselves in any number of ways: by the volumes they can handle, by the number of industry awards they have earned, by the manner in which they handle an interruption in “business-as-usual”, and so on. They can also do so by demonstrating a creative, effective and successful effort to use or dispose of the biosolids they generate. Given those criteria alone, the Southerly Wastewater Treatment Plant could likely be seen as one of the premier WWTPs in operation today. Just coming off a five-year, $350 million expansion which nearly tripled its peak capacity from 114 mgd to about 330 mgd (built-in contingencies for further expansion can take the plant as high as 550 mgd), the plant services the majority of the greater Columbus area. State-of-the-art in every regard, Southerly is poised to build upon an already impressive reputation that has won them numerous National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA) awards for plant and employee performance.

Columbus_Southerly_1.jpg

But it is also its innovative sludge disposal program that separates Southerly from super-plant wannabes. Using a quartet of heavy-duty pumps and a number of sliding frame components (all from Schwing Bioset, Inc. [SBI] Somerset, WI) cake can either be routed directly for incineration or sent to a pair of storage silos. Once in the silos, the material is readily available for truck-loading and transport, either to an already-successful composting operation run by the department or directly to the landfill.  Options, it seems, are the hallmark of this successful operation. 

Change They Can Use

Built in 1967, the Southerly WWTP is one of two plants serving the Columbus metropolitan area (the other being the nearby Jackson Pike WWTP). The current plant expansion which so dramatically increased overall capacity, also increased volumes in the solids handling area. New centrifuges, installed a number of years in advance of that expansion, handle that increase nicely, according to Jeff Hall, Assistant Plant Manager.

“That upgrade was implemented both to replace aging equipment, as in the case of the centrifuges, and to add functionality to other areas like the transportation of solids,” he says. In the past, primary solids were gravity thickened while older centrifuges thickened the waste activated sludge (WAS). The new units now thicken both the primary solids and the WAS. This new approach boosts the solids content of the resulting dewatered cake to about 20-25%, a nice improvement over the 17-21% solids content with the older system.”

Additional changes brought about in that initial upgrade included installation of new cake pumps, a pair of storage silos, and sliding frames at two points in the solids handling process. 

Columbus_Southerly_3.jpg

The Route To Disposal

Getting cake to the point where disposal options are available is a function of Southerly’s pumps and silos. As material exits the centrifuges, it is routed to any of four Schwing KSP 45V(HD)L-SFMS pumps which direct it to the appropriate area. Where that is, varies greatly according to need.

“Even though incineration is the most efficient method of disposal, we still try to keep the compost operation fed with as much as it needs, since that is the better use of the product,” says Carmon “Skip” Allen, Solids Supervisor 2. “Obviously that can vary from day to day. The balance of the material—we can do anywhere from 5.5 tons up to 9 tons an hour—is then sent for incineration. But we know at all times what is going to the silos for storage and what’s getting burned.”

The sludge pumps at Southerly are designed to generate a force sufficient to move cake the long distances needed for either incineration or storage. He says it is easily 300 feet to the multi-hearth incinerators (which have operating temps of 1400°F), and about 400 feet to the storage silos. Equipped with Schwing Bioset’s Sludge Flow Measuring System, the pumps are able to measure to within +/-5% the amount of sludge that is pumped to the incinerator. This simplifies their USEPA reporting requirements for their incinerator operations.

“Material headed to the silos, however, has an additional challenge to overcome,” says Allen. “Once there, the cake has to go straight up another 100 feet to enter the top of the structures, so the force needed to do that is really pretty impressive. I don’t think any regular equipment would be up to a task like that; these are definitely the right pumps for the job.”

Giving it the Slip

Despite maximum operating pressures of 1,100 psi for each pump, those extended distances at Southerly prompted Schwing Bioset to make accommodations to help move the sludge along. To do so, they added a “slip ring,” or pipeline lubrication system. Schwing Bioset’s unique design includes a 360 degree annular groove that evenly injects a thin film of water around the entire annulus of the pipe that separates viscous and sticky materials from the inner wall of the pipeline. The end result is a reduction in friction loss in the pipeline, and lower—in some cases better than 50% less—pipeline operating pressures.

Additional benefits include a savings in energy by reducing the demand on each pump and hydraulic unit, and, because of the reduction in pipeline friction, an increase in wear part life. While other systems try to address the friction issue through the use of as many as four drilled ports which inject more fluid, this offsets a percentage of the gains made by the centrifuges. Still other designs mix polymer with the water to help reduce pressure which, while effective, adds both up-front and perpetual costs to the operation.

Tom Thomas, Maintenance Supervisor 2 at Southerly, says the reduction in friction has also shown benefits in wear part life for the pumps—a fact that is borne out in similar results at Jackson Pike. “We run these pumps round the clock and, even with that 24/7 operation, parts such as the pumping rams, poppet valve discs and seats are getting six months of wear. That’s about 4,000 hours of wear part life, which is outstanding given what they’re being asked to pump.”

Silo Efficiency

As mentioned, the SBI sliding frame silos offer a storage option for cake headed either to the landfill for disposal or to the compost site. Prior to their installation, Southerly relied upon a smaller holding vessel known as “the pit,” a belt-fed, hopper-equipped component that used a series of screws to feed a truck sitting under the discharge chute. City officials say the new silos are larger (providing about 75% more capacity) as well as far more efficient, thereby reducing truck loading times from 45 minutes with “the pit,” down to only five minutes. This was an important criterion when selecting equipment.

Because the City pays a contractor to haul the biosolids, reducing loading times lowers overall hauling costs—the trucks now spend more time hauling and less time waiting to be loaded. The net result is more trucks loaded per day (and a lower cost to do so.) In addition, because of that added storage capability, the composting operation now has the option of drawing material solely from Jackson Pike, if necessary. "Anytime you can reuse something rather than just burying it or burning it, you are making a positive impact," says Assistant Plant Manager Jeff Hall.

“Today, we are reusing about one-third of the solids we handle through the composting operation,” says Hall. “That’s obviously good from an economic standpoint, since we are generating revenue from a product that was once simply discarded. However, it is also a plus from an environmental perspective."

The concept of the sliding frame silo is simple, yet very effective. Hydraulic cylinders move an elliptical frame across the silo floor. The frame’s action not only breaks any bridging that can occur over the extraction screw, it also pushes and pulls material towards the silo extraction screws for discharge into trucks.

Allen says the sliding frame silos were a nice addition to the operation. “Each silo holds better than 1,500 tons of cake, so even if one of the incinerators went down and there was an interruption in the trucking operation, we’d still have a nice short-term storage option while things get back up again. It’s really all about flexibility and these silos afford us that.”

Due to the sheer size of the silos, they are each equipped with three extraction screw conveyors at the bottom which allows the trailers to be evenly loaded without having to be jockeyed back and forth.

The silos also include an odor and splash control shroud that pulls fumes directly off the trailer, thereby minimizing the need for odor control in the truck loading building. In addition, it helps reduce the chance of material splatter during load-out, and confines any such instances to the area immediately adjacent to the trailer, which makes periodic cleanup of the area much easier.

Allen adds that they also use SBI sliding frames on hoppers in advance of the pumps which feed the incinerator. Doing so provides a wide spot in the process line enabling them to maintain steady incinerator operations for several hours in the event of any upset condition with the centrifuges.

Sibling Growth

Southerly WWTP’s growth is being mirrored in the expansion of its sister plant, Jackson Pike WWTP, located a mere seven miles from Southerly’s facility. That plant also installed SBI equipment for similar end uses, but because its capacities are less, scaled down the size of that equipment. So today, Jackson Pike uses a quartet of KSP 25 V(HD)L pumps, rather than the 45s in use at Southerly and powers them with a 100hp power pack compared to its 150hp counterpart. The silos, though smaller in height, are of the same design and offer the same performance benefits as Southerly’s. Once the expansion at Jackson Pike is complete, the two plants will effectively meet all of Columbus’s wastewater treatment needs for decades to come. For Skip Allen, seeing construction at Southerly come to an end after nearly six years is a welcome relief.

“We are all really happy about the changes that have taken place here; there’s no doubt about that. But it feels like we will now finally be able to get back into the treatment plant business. With construction done, we have a big headache behind us, we have a great operation in place, and we’re doing good things for the residents of Columbus. That’s not a bad place to be.”

Columbus_Southerly_odor_hood.jpg

 

To download the entire #14 application report for Columbus, Ohio, click here.

To learn more about Schwing Bioset, our products and engineering, or this project specifically, please call 715-247-3433, email marketing@schwingbioset.com, view our website, or find us on social media.

 

 Download Our Brochures    or Application Reports

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Tags: Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Municipal Pumps, Sliding Frame Silos, Truck Loading

Upgrading a Reliable Necessity - Piston Pumps at the Greeley WWTP

 

Written by Joshua DiValentino, December 2, 2015

The City of Greeley, Colorado, wastewater treatment facility recently implemented a series of strategic upgrades and major improvements were made to the Biosolids Facility. The Greeley facility repurposes its dewatered biosolids cake by trucking it for land application into remote Northern Colorado. The existing Schwing Bioset piston pump located in the sludge dewatering building had been in operation for 20 years and was a key component of this process.

The Greeley facility had relied on its sole Schwing Bioset KSP 25 cake pump for two decades prior to the upgrades. During that time, the existing pump was the only means of transportation for dewatered biosolids between the centrifuge dewatering equipment and the truck loading bin. The piston pump could have been a “bottle-neck” for a facility with limited storage capacity. However, the existing pump provided an exceptionally high level of uptime over its operational life at Greeley, with minimal wear part consumption.   

By 2014-15 the sole KSP 25 had been in operation since the mid 90’s. The City of Greeley facility, working on a larger plant upgrade, decided to implement a new pumping system for the coming decades. Greeley once again chose to invest in a Schwing Bioset KSP Piston pump.

In order to be as cost effective as possible, but also provide maximum redundancy for the foreseeable future, Greeley chose to purchase a new KSP 25, as well as upgrade the existing KSP unit to modern standards. The existing pump was upgraded to match the new KSP unit with control modifications, and upgraded safety features offer easier remote operation and even longer wear part life. The existing unit was also outfitted with a new Hydraulic Power Unit, offering modern hydraulic feed pumps and unlimited control variability.  The two pumps provide redundancy and additional capacity for growth, as well as a modern control network with the current plant SCADA.

Schwing Bioset KSP Municipal Piston Pump  Schwing Bioset Hydraulic Power Pack

The new pump system included a Hydraulic Power Pack, a Twin Screw Feeder, the Control Panel, and of course the Piston Pump. The Schwing Bioset services team worked with the installing contractor and Greeley personnel to integrate the updated control system features on both pumps with the plant MCC.  The new Schwing Bioset KSP cake pumping system (complete with two fully-operational pumps) was turned over to the City of Greeley in the fall of 2015.       

To learn more about this project specifically or learn more about our pumps, please contact this blog’s author, Josh DiValentino, call 715.247.3433, and/or visit our website here: SBI Municipal Pumps.

 

Tags: Piston Pumps, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Pumps, Municipal Pumps

Screw Press and Bioset Demo Leads to Treatment Plant Expansion

 

Written by Tom Welch, September 10, 2015

The Springfield, IL, Metro Sanitary District (SMSD) Sugar Creek Plant is going to be expanding over the next two years.  They currently have no dewatering capability and they treat their liquid sludge with lime and liquid land-apply on their own fields onsite at the plant.  In June of 2013, Schwing Bioset was invited to run a dual demo of their screw press and Bioset systems.  The pilot study was conducted for two weeks where the Waste Activated Sludge (WAS) was dewatered with the screw presses and then converted to a Class A EQ product through the advanced alkaline stabilization Bioset process.  Crawford, Murphy, and Tilly Engineers coordinated the pilot study for the District.

Prior to the pilot study, the plant operations team was leaning toward using belt presses for their future dewatering needs.  They had familiarity with belt presses and they were concerned that screw press technology did not have the capability to meet their requirements of 2660 dry pounds per hour without having to install a large number of screw press machines.  They were basing their concerns on historical screw press throughput capability based on their market research.

Springfield_Demo_Image_1-1

(Pilot Study Setup at SMSD Sugar Creek Plant)

During the pilot study, the Schwing Bioset team brought their FSP 600 screw press machine to dewater the partially aerobically digested WAS.  The goal was to dewater the material to the highest percent solids, with an excellent capture rate, and also with the least amount of polymer consumption.  The dewatered product would then be passed along to the mobile Bioset operation, which is an advanced alkaline stabilization process that can produce a Class A EQ Biosolid end product that can be utilized as a fertilizer or a soil amendment. 

The first week of the demo was utilized to optimize the screw press performance, and the second week to monitor continued performance of the screw press while utilizing the Bioset operation to produce a Class A EQ product. The purpose of this was to monitor the product over a couple month period to determine the stability of the Class A EQ product at the Springfield plant.  Over the two weeks, the FSP 600 screw press unit produced a dewatered product of 30% solids on average, even while operating the machine at 130-150% of design throughput capability.  After polymer optimization, the end result was realized with 14 pounds of active polymer per ton and the capture rate was above 95% during the entire two week period.  During the second week of the pilot, the Bioset system was utilized the entire time and was successful in producing the Class A EQ product.

Based on the successful results of the pilot, SMSD gave Crawford, Murphy, and Tilly the direction to design the new biosolids handling facility to include two high-performance screw presses, each capable of dewatering 1330 dry pounds per hour.  Although they liked the simplicity of the Bioset Class A operation, they were uncertain if the need for Class A was justified for the new facility.  They settled on a Class B Bioset system that utilizes all of the components of the Class A design, except for the reactor.  Space was left in the building to install the reactor in the future should Class A become necessary.  The job bid in December of 2014 and Schwing Bioset received an order for the two high-performance screw presses and the Class B alkalization system in early 2015. 

These FSP 1102 screw presses showcase the capabilities of high-performance screw presses and offer larger plants an appealing alternative to traditional belt filter press or centrifuge dewatering.

To learn more about our screw presses, Bioset process, and/or this project specifically, contact a Schwing Bioset Regional Sales Manager, call 715.247.3433, email us, and/or visit our website here.

Springfield_Demo_Image_2-1

(Class A EQ product at 44% solids)

 

 

Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Alkaline Stabilization, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Screw Press, Dewatering

Recent Changes Have WWTP Poised to Become a Regional Solution for Sludge Disposal

 

Recent changes have Buffalo-area’s Bird Island WWTP poised to become a regional solution for sludge disposal.

 

Written by Larry Trojak, Trojak Communications

Version also published in WE&T Magazine, July 2015

 

Sharing the Wealth

Wastewater treatment plants, like most of their business counterparts today, are being forced to cope with a barrage of challenges including rising costs, an often-demanding customer base and an ever-changing economic landscape. To effectively deal with these and other issues, a growing number of plants are thinking outside the box to improve their operations. For the Buffalo (N.Y.) Sewer Authority (BSA), that creative effort now includes supplementing their own volume of dewatered sludge with a similar (but richer) product from neighboring communities. Doing so is allowing them to dramatically reduce incineration-related fuel costs and, at the same time, assist those communities with their sludge disposal problems. Sharing biosolids? Seems only fitting from a utility serving the “City of Good Neighbors.”

 

Good Day at Black Rock

First chartered in 1937 as a primary-only treatment plant, the facility now known as the Bird Island WWTP near Buffalo’s Black Rock District was expanded to include secondary treatment in the late 1970s. According to Tom Caulfield, BSA’s administrator of capital improvements and development, the expansion was in direct response to Clean Water Act mandates.

“That massive expansion — essentially, construction of a totally new secondary treatment facility — added aeration and secondary clarification capabilities,” he says. “Even today, few people realize that Bird Island is the second largest wastewater treatment plant in all of New York state.  Only the Newtown Creek WWTP in Brooklyn’s Greenpoint community is larger. We are designed to handle a peak flow of up to 540 million gallons per day (MGD) but are currently averaging flows of about 130 mgd.”

In addition to the city of Buffalo, Bird Island WWTP serves a good number of other neighboring communities including the villages of Sloan and Depew, and the towns of West Seneca, Orchard Park, Alden, Lancaster, Cheektowaga, Elma and includes a limited amount of flow from the Town of Tonawanda. Despite that vast coverage, it was actually the nearby Town of Amherst which, by choosing to re-think its overall approach to sludge disposal, dramatically changed the complexion of Bird Island WWTP’s biosolids processing operation.

 

Plan B for Amherst

For more than a decade, the Town of Amherst had been dewatering its sludge, pelletizing it, and working hard to generate a market for it as a high-grade fertilizer product. In 2010, however, rising operational costs, coupled with aging equipment, prompted them to rethink that strategy, according to Michael Letina, BSA’s treatment plant superintendent.

“Amherst was hoping to have the same level of success with their fertilizer pellet that the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District has had with their Milorganite, but that just never happened,” he says. “Then they reached a point at which their digesters needed serious repair and, rather than incur the costs of upgrading the system, they started looking for alternatives. They determined that sending their [dewatered] waste activated sludge (WAS) here would make the most sense for them both logistically and financially.”

In early 2010 a 10-year agreement was signed, approving Amherst’s shipment of material from their facility to Bird Island. Today, about 70,000 pounds of WAS is trucked in on a daily basis from Amherst to the Black Rock location.

 

To Burn or Not to Burn

Getting Bird Island to a point where they could efficiently accept Amherst’s sludge was no small undertaking. Working through the Buffalo branch of the engineering firm Arcadis U.S., Inc., plans were drawn up and considered, with the final $2.38 million construction contract offering a couple of options for the material being delivered.

IMG_1270a-pump1

“Essentially, the process began with construction crews cutting a hole in the15-inch thick floor of our truck weighing area, and installing a 60 cubic yard push floor bin supplied by Schwing Bioset (Somerset, WI). There, customers’ vehicles — at the beginning it was only the Town of Amherst’s trucks — could empty the dewatered WAS they were delivering,” says Letina. “The hopper contains a hydraulic push-floor that sends material through a gate where it drops into a screw feeder, then into a Schwing Bioset KSP 12V (HD) pump designed for 1,000 psi operating pressure which pushes it up to the third floor for incineration. Depending on our needs at the time, we also have the option to take that sludge out of the bin through an alternate extraction screw conveyor and drop it down to the sub basement where it can be re-wetted and sent to our digesters to produce methane.” 

Adding Amherst’s dewatered WAS to the operation was a win-win in a number of regards. Not only did it address the town’s needs to effectively dispose of its sludge, the material’s high volatile content — generally in the 76% range — proved an excellent fuel for Bird Island’s incineration effort.

“Our own biosolids are anaerobically digested and, as a result, are only about 46 percent volatile, so it takes a considerable amount of gas to burn,” says Letina. “However, putting material from Amherst on top of it is like throwing lighter fluid on an open flame. Now, we continually monitor to see whether methane production or incineration will serve us better. It’s a nice luxury to have.”

 

On the Up and Up

With the Amherst-generated cake added to the equation, steady, reliable equipment operation is key to ensuring that both plants realize the maximum benefit of the new effort.  The Schwing Bioset biosolids pump installed as part of the recent expansion has definitely risen to the challenge, says Alex Emmerson, BSA’s process coordinator.

IMG_1347a-1

“The pump has its work cut out for it, taking material that is generally in the 26% to 28% solids range and sending it more than 65 feet straight up to the conveyor feeding the incinerator,” he says. “To handle issues of excessive in-line friction, Schwing Bioset also supplied an injection-ring system that lubricates the pipe wall with a small amount of fluid as it moves.”

On average, Bird Island maintains about 900,000 pounds of inventory on its secondary treatment system. They recently had a case, however, in which inventories ran low, prompting the need to curtail wasting. “That meant we had to rely solely on the ‘outside’ Biosolids and really push the pump — sometimes operating it at three times its normal speed,” says Emmerson. “Even with the added workload we were consistently pumping 8,000 pounds per hour and never had an issue. It’s definitely a key part of the operation.”

He adds that there is a certain peace of mind in knowing that the outside biosolids operation (which just recently was expanded to include a similar agreement with the Town of Tonawanda), affords them a nice contingency plan.

“Now we know we are covered if something unforeseen — like a centrifuge failure — occurs and we need to step up production using the imported biosolids to meet incinerator demand.” 

 

Money in the Bank

BSA has been prepping for growth for some time now, an effort that included a recent incinerator rehab. According to Letina, that updating, which included a new scrubber pack and burners, and carried a price tag of nearly $5 million, allows them to meet new environmental regulations that take effect in March, 2016.  However, their ability to become a regional biosolids processor — and keep costs steady in doing so — is a real source of pride.

“Much of the preliminary work for this part of the operation is the brainchild of Jim Keller our treatment plant superintendent and Roberta ‘Robbie’ Gaiek, BSA’s plant administrator,” says Caulfield.  “Because of their planning and foresight, we are already seeing the fruits of this effort.  Before the installation of the centrifuges and digesters, this plant used about 550,000 decatherms (Dth) of natural gas a year; now we are averaging about 175,000. So we’ve effectively cut our gas consumption by about 65%. With the rehabbed incinerator and addition of the higher volatile material from Amherst and Tonawanda, even with the added volumes we hope to be down around 150,000 to 160,000 Dth a year.”

The savings realized from Bird Island’s reduction in fuel costs is being reinvested in onsite projects, eliminating the need for bonding and the headaches that come with it. “More importantly,” says Caulfield, “it has also allowed us to go nine years now without a rate hike to our customers. In light of what the economy has been through, not a lot of utilities can say that.”

 

Looking Forward

Future plans under consideration —with additional anticipated savings — include a heat and power project designed to recover and re-use exhaust from the plant’s incinerators.

“The original plan was designed to incorporate the use of three waste/heat recovery boilers, says Letina.  “Once operational, the exhaust off the afterburners would create steam which would power a turbine and generate 1.5 - 2 megawatts of electricity — about 1/3 of our current load. Our electric bill right now is substantial — about $4.5 - $5 million a year. If we can save another $1.5 to $2 million annually, that money can be reinvested into the infrastructure, again avoiding bonding and rate hikes. The last few years have been challenging but definitely worth the effort. With these proposed changes and our growing role as a regional biosolids processor, this is an exciting time for Bird Island and BSA overall.”

 

To learn more about Schwing Bioset, our products and engineering, or this project specifically, please call 715-247-3433, email marketing@schwingbioset.com, view our website, or find us on social media.

To view a version of this story published in WE&T Magazine, click here.

 

 

Tags: Piston Pumps, Screw Feeders, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Sewage Sludge, hydraulic push floor bin

Schwing Bioset Exhibiting at WEF Residuals and Biosolids Conference

 

June 4, 2015

Schwing Bioset, Inc. will be exhibiting at the 2015 WEF Residuals and Biosolids Conference in Washington, DC, on June 8th and 9th.

Please be sure to stop by our booth (#106) while you're on the exhibit floor.

 

Visit the conference website to view the event details and exhibition map: http://www.residualsbiosolids-wefiwa.org/

Here is the Schwing Bioset listing for the show: http://app.core-apps.com/15rbwe/exhibitors/d4d3b4f759e0e3a5025efd0a3d0e4fc4

Learn more about our Bioset Process and Class 'A' Biosolids, Dewatering Equipment, Pumps, and other products here: http://www.schwingbioset.com/products

 

If you'd like to meet with one of our team members, please contact marketing@schwingbioset.com for the names of the team members who are attending the show.

We hope to see you there!

 

Bioset_Video_Screenshot

 

Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Events, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Pumps, Dewatering

Where Should the "Stuff" Go - Part 2

 

Written by Scott Springer, Director of Sales and Marketing, Schwing Bioset, Inc.

May 29, 2015

Not in My Back Yard vs Solutions – An open discussion on disposal or re-use of Biosolids

Going back to the previous blog post discussing disposal or re-use of Biosolids, again, some of the environmentalists claim that the current US Government regulations (EPA Part 503) on Biosolids is either outdated based on the chemicals in today’s world or that there is an EPA conspiracy to hide the scientific facts from the public, and that somehow, the operators, equipment, and services people are behind it.  When Schwing Bioset posts on the subject, the reply from others is often that we only care about $$$ and profits at the expense of the health of people, animals, etc.

Schwing Bioset typically replies in this manner:

If there is or was a conspiracy, Schwing Bisoet has never been part of it.  I realize that the suppliers and solution providers are easy targets, because we are accessible, but any anger should really be directed at the Government agencies in charge. 
 
If the regulations are truly outdated, then the environmentalist effort needs to be to get the laws changed, not attack the people and companies who are following the current laws.
 
Also, I am not naive to believe that there are no companies out there with less than perfect ethics.  There are documented incidents of some service providers dumping sludge (treated or untreated) where they should not to scam profits.  I agree that there should be anger against these types of companies, but please don’t lump us all into that category.  There are a lot of good people and companies in this industry that want to provide a better world for all of us.  And this is business, even the good people need to make a fair profit in order to continue developing new and better solutions.

 

Schwing Bioset’s Bioset Process achieves Class ‘AA’ Biosolids via the time vs. temperature equation and pH adjustment per the EPA 503 regulations.  From start-up to shut-down, the Bioset Process remains an easy to operate system that is reliable, clean (enclosed), and odor controlled.  With ever-rising energy costs, the Bioset Process stands out as an economical method to producing Class ‘AA’ Biosolids.

For questions or more information on Biosolids or our Bioset Process, please leave a comment on this blog post and we will be sure to reply or contact you, or send an email to marketing@schwingbioset.com.

  

BeneficialReuse_2_4

 

 

Tags: Bioset Process, Beneficial Reuse, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment

Where Should the "Stuff" Go - Part 1

 

Written by Scott Springer, Director of Sales and Marketing, Schwing Bioset, Inc.

May 27, 2015

Not in My Back Yard vs Solutions – An open discussion on disposal or re-use of Biosolids

The internet is a wonderful thing – sometimes.  Information is almost limitless, as are opinions on virtually any topic.  While it does not compare in magnitude to the doings of a Kardashian, there is a lot of vigorous debate on the topic of how Biosolids should be disposed of.   These debates play out on Twitter, LinkedIn Group chats, and local newspaper e-article comment areas, to name a few.  Some of the debates are polite, informational, and serve some purpose to educate those reading the content.  Others get nasty, personal, and are embarrassing.  In my opinion, these biosolids discussions tend to put people into one of 5 camps:

1. Environmentalists / Scientists

2. Engineers / Consultants / Suppliers to the Wastewater Treatment Industry (which Schwing Bioset would fall into)

3. Farmers

4. Citizens

5. Internet Trolls (a term I learned that basically describes people who just like to take out their frustrations on anyone and everyone on the internet)

 

Here is one trend that I have observed in these exchanges:

Several of the environmentalists claim that the waste treatment process is inadequate to remove all dangerous elements from the waste stream.  They will list dozens of chemicals that are put into the waste stream from pharmaceuticals (consumed or not) that we flush down the toilet every day to chemicals that are in the waste stream of industrial plants.

Schwing Bioset typically replies in this manner:

I don’t have an advanced degree in the sciences, so there is no use in me debating this point.  I do know (with my engineering degree) that:

       i.      Not every waste treatment plant has input that includes all of the chemicals on the list, especially the smaller to mid-size plants.  Some of the industrial plants have their own treatment or pre-treatment plants and don’t send any waste to the municipality.

       ii.      Some of the levels of these chemicals get into the parts per billion and trillion – which may or may not be harmful to people, animals, or plants.  But the reality is that some of these are way below the detectable limit of most analysis techniques available.  A lot of work needs to be done on this exhaustive list to determine what is really dangerous, and how to either remove it or prevent it from getting into the waste stream.

For more thoughts on ‘where the stuff should go,’ check back to the Schwing Bioset website soon.

For questions or more information on Biosolids or our Bioset Process, please leave a comment on this blog post and we will be sure to reply or contact you, or send an email to marketing@schwingbioset.com.

 

 ProductSpreader

Tags: Bioset Process, Beneficial Reuse, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment

Schwing Bioset is Exhibiting at Several Trade Shows in May

 

Posted on Apr 30, 2015 9:33:00 AM

The Schwing Bioset Teams will be traveling nationally and internationally to exhibit at five trade shows during the month of May. 

To learn more about Schwing Bioset pumps (municipal or mining), fluid bed dryers, screw presses, sliding frames, the bioset process, and more, please be sure to find us on the exhibit floor at any of these upcoming shows:

 

California Water Environment Association (CWEA), April 28 - May 1 in San Diego, CA

http://myac15.com/

Florida Water Resources Conference (FWRC), May 3 - 5 in Orlando, FL

http://fwrc.org/

Canadian Institute of Mining (CIM), May 9 - 11 in Montreal, Canada

http://www.miningandexploration.ca/events/article/cim_2015_convention/

Exponor Chile 2015, May 11 - 15 in Antofagasta, Chile

http://www.exponor.cl/en/

Central States Water Environment Association (CSWEA), May 18 - 20 in Oakbrook Terrace, IL

http://www.cswea.org/events/

 

If you'd like to meet with one of our team members, please contact marketing@schwingbioset.com for the name of the contact(s) who is attending the show.

We look forward to seeing you!

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Tags: Announcements, Bioset Process, Events, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Schwing Bioset, Mining Pumps, Municipal Pumps

Schwing Bioset, Inc. Expands its Leadership Position as the Class A/AA Biosolids Solution Provider

 

Published on April 14, 2015 (Somerset, WI)

Schwing Bioset, Inc. has completed another successful Beneficial Reuse installation.  The City of Immokalee, Florida, chose Schwing Bioset to provide not only its Best in Class equipment, but design and build capabilities as well.

The heart of the system is the patented Bioset process and reactor that converts raw sludge into Class AA Biosolids, making it ready for easy land application.  Licensed as a fertilizer in the state of Florida, the Class AA product produced by the Bioset process is a highly marketable and sought after product.  Millions of tons have been produced and beneficially reused by the Bioset process. 

Taking advantage of some of the other high quality products Schwing Bioset offers, Immokalee integrated their Twin Piston Pump and Dewatering Screw Press into their design.

The Immokalee Water & Sewer District Executive Director, Eva Deyo, is very pleased with the system.  “The project came in under budget and went from concept to completion much quicker than other options.  As promised, the Schwing Bioset solution has proven to be easy to operate for our staff and very cost effective to operate, and the end product is exceptional,” said Deyo.  

Schwing Bioset Regional Sales Manager, Tom Welch, is thrilled with the results of the project.  “The City of Immokalee was tremendous to work with throughout the entire process.  Their vision and understanding of the value that the Schwing Bioset solution offered was evident throughout.  They realized after investigating numerous options that you don’t have to break the bank to get state-of-the-art technology,” said Welch.

“The experience of our Design, Engineering, and Project Management Teams has really shown during the execution of this fast track project.  The Schwing Bioset Team has executed on well over $150M in projects, with 2015 proving to be our biggest year ever,” said Tom Anderson, Owner and President of Schwing Bioset.

About Schwing Bioset

For more than 25 years, Schwing Bioset has been helping wastewater treatment plants, mines, and power generation customers by engineering material handling solutions. Schwing Bioset’s custom engineered solutions can be found in hundreds of wastewater treatment plants in North America as well as mines and tunnels around the world.

For questions or more information, please contact Schwing Bioset at 715-247-3433 or marketing@schwingbioset.com, or visit the website at http://www.schwingbioset.com.

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Tags: Bioset Process, Piston Pumps, Municipal Biosolids, Beneficial Reuse, Class 'AA' Biosolids, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Fertilizer, Recycled Waste, Schwing Bioset, Municipal, Screw Press