News from Schwing Bioset

Where Should the "Stuff" Go - Part 2

 

Written by Scott Springer, Director of Sales and Marketing, Schwing Bioset, Inc.

May 29, 2015

Not in My Back Yard vs Solutions – An open discussion on disposal or re-use of Biosolids

Going back to the previous blog post discussing disposal or re-use of Biosolids, again, some of the environmentalists claim that the current US Government regulations (EPA Part 503) on Biosolids is either outdated based on the chemicals in today’s world or that there is an EPA conspiracy to hide the scientific facts from the public, and that somehow, the operators, equipment, and services people are behind it.  When Schwing Bioset posts on the subject, the reply from others is often that we only care about $$$ and profits at the expense of the health of people, animals, etc.

Schwing Bioset typically replies in this manner:

If there is or was a conspiracy, Schwing Bisoet has never been part of it.  I realize that the suppliers and solution providers are easy targets, because we are accessible, but any anger should really be directed at the Government agencies in charge. 
 
If the regulations are truly outdated, then the environmentalist effort needs to be to get the laws changed, not attack the people and companies who are following the current laws.
 
Also, I am not naive to believe that there are no companies out there with less than perfect ethics.  There are documented incidents of some service providers dumping sludge (treated or untreated) where they should not to scam profits.  I agree that there should be anger against these types of companies, but please don’t lump us all into that category.  There are a lot of good people and companies in this industry that want to provide a better world for all of us.  And this is business, even the good people need to make a fair profit in order to continue developing new and better solutions.

 

Schwing Bioset’s Bioset Process achieves Class ‘AA’ Biosolids via the time vs. temperature equation and pH adjustment per the EPA 503 regulations.  From start-up to shut-down, the Bioset Process remains an easy to operate system that is reliable, clean (enclosed), and odor controlled.  With ever-rising energy costs, the Bioset Process stands out as an economical method to producing Class ‘AA’ Biosolids.

For questions or more information on Biosolids or our Bioset Process, please leave a comment on this blog post and we will be sure to reply or contact you, or send an email to marketing@schwingbioset.com.

  

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Tags: Bioset Process, Beneficial Reuse, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment

Where Should the "Stuff" Go - Part 1

 

Written by Scott Springer, Director of Sales and Marketing, Schwing Bioset, Inc.

May 27, 2015

Not in My Back Yard vs Solutions – An open discussion on disposal or re-use of Biosolids

The internet is a wonderful thing – sometimes.  Information is almost limitless, as are opinions on virtually any topic.  While it does not compare in magnitude to the doings of a Kardashian, there is a lot of vigorous debate on the topic of how Biosolids should be disposed of.   These debates play out on Twitter, LinkedIn Group chats, and local newspaper e-article comment areas, to name a few.  Some of the debates are polite, informational, and serve some purpose to educate those reading the content.  Others get nasty, personal, and are embarrassing.  In my opinion, these biosolids discussions tend to put people into one of 5 camps:

1. Environmentalists / Scientists

2. Engineers / Consultants / Suppliers to the Wastewater Treatment Industry (which Schwing Bioset would fall into)

3. Farmers

4. Citizens

5. Internet Trolls (a term I learned that basically describes people who just like to take out their frustrations on anyone and everyone on the internet)

 

Here is one trend that I have observed in these exchanges:

Several of the environmentalists claim that the waste treatment process is inadequate to remove all dangerous elements from the waste stream.  They will list dozens of chemicals that are put into the waste stream from pharmaceuticals (consumed or not) that we flush down the toilet every day to chemicals that are in the waste stream of industrial plants.

Schwing Bioset typically replies in this manner:

I don’t have an advanced degree in the sciences, so there is no use in me debating this point.  I do know (with my engineering degree) that:

       i.      Not every waste treatment plant has input that includes all of the chemicals on the list, especially the smaller to mid-size plants.  Some of the industrial plants have their own treatment or pre-treatment plants and don’t send any waste to the municipality.

       ii.      Some of the levels of these chemicals get into the parts per billion and trillion – which may or may not be harmful to people, animals, or plants.  But the reality is that some of these are way below the detectable limit of most analysis techniques available.  A lot of work needs to be done on this exhaustive list to determine what is really dangerous, and how to either remove it or prevent it from getting into the waste stream.

For more thoughts on ‘where the stuff should go,’ check back to the Schwing Bioset website soon.

For questions or more information on Biosolids or our Bioset Process, please leave a comment on this blog post and we will be sure to reply or contact you, or send an email to marketing@schwingbioset.com.

 

 ProductSpreader

Tags: Bioset Process, Beneficial Reuse, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment

Schwing Bioset is Exhibiting at Several Trade Shows in May

 

Posted on Apr 30, 2015 9:33:00 AM

The Schwing Bioset Teams will be traveling nationally and internationally to exhibit at five trade shows during the month of May. 

To learn more about Schwing Bioset pumps (municipal or mining), fluid bed dryers, screw presses, sliding frames, the bioset process, and more, please be sure to find us on the exhibit floor at any of these upcoming shows:

 

California Water Environment Association (CWEA), April 28 - May 1 in San Diego, CA

http://myac15.com/

Florida Water Resources Conference (FWRC), May 3 - 5 in Orlando, FL

http://fwrc.org/

Canadian Institute of Mining (CIM), May 9 - 11 in Montreal, Canada

http://www.miningandexploration.ca/events/article/cim_2015_convention/

Exponor Chile 2015, May 11 - 15 in Antofagasta, Chile

http://www.exponor.cl/en/

Central States Water Environment Association (CSWEA), May 18 - 20 in Oakbrook Terrace, IL

http://www.cswea.org/events/

 

If you'd like to meet with one of our team members, please contact marketing@schwingbioset.com for the name of the contact(s) who is attending the show.

We look forward to seeing you!

Bioset_Process_ImagePump-Yellow

 

Tags: Announcements, Bioset Process, Events, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Schwing Bioset, Mining Pumps, Municipal Pumps

Schwing Bioset, Inc. Expands its Leadership Position as the Class A/AA Biosolids Solution Provider

 

Published on April 14, 2015 (Somerset, WI)

Schwing Bioset, Inc. has completed another successful Beneficial Reuse installation.  The City of Immokalee, Florida, chose Schwing Bioset to provide not only its Best in Class equipment, but design and build capabilities as well.

The heart of the system is the patented Bioset process and reactor that converts raw sludge into Class AA Biosolids, making it ready for easy land application.  Licensed as a fertilizer in the state of Florida, the Class AA product produced by the Bioset process is a highly marketable and sought after product.  Millions of tons have been produced and beneficially reused by the Bioset process. 

Taking advantage of some of the other high quality products Schwing Bioset offers, Immokalee integrated their Twin Piston Pump and Dewatering Screw Press into their design.

The Immokalee Water & Sewer District Executive Director, Eva Deyo, is very pleased with the system.  “The project came in under budget and went from concept to completion much quicker than other options.  As promised, the Schwing Bioset solution has proven to be easy to operate for our staff and very cost effective to operate, and the end product is exceptional,” said Deyo.  

Schwing Bioset Regional Sales Manager, Tom Welch, is thrilled with the results of the project.  “The City of Immokalee was tremendous to work with throughout the entire process.  Their vision and understanding of the value that the Schwing Bioset solution offered was evident throughout.  They realized after investigating numerous options that you don’t have to break the bank to get state-of-the-art technology,” said Welch.

“The experience of our Design, Engineering, and Project Management Teams has really shown during the execution of this fast track project.  The Schwing Bioset Team has executed on well over $150M in projects, with 2015 proving to be our biggest year ever,” said Tom Anderson, Owner and President of Schwing Bioset.

About Schwing Bioset

For more than 25 years, Schwing Bioset has been helping wastewater treatment plants, mines, and power generation customers by engineering material handling solutions. Schwing Bioset’s custom engineered solutions can be found in hundreds of wastewater treatment plants in North America as well as mines and tunnels around the world.

For questions or more information, please contact Schwing Bioset at 715-247-3433 or marketing@schwingbioset.com, or visit the website at http://www.schwingbioset.com.

SBI Logo Small resized 600

Tags: Bioset Process, Piston Pumps, Municipal Biosolids, Beneficial Reuse, Class 'AA' Biosolids, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Fertilizer, Recycled Waste, Schwing Bioset, Municipal, Screw Press

Schwing Bioset and Biosolids Distribution Services Open First Owned and Operated Regional Class AA/EQ Bioset Facility

Posted on August 28, 2013
The recently opened BDS and Schwing Bioset Regional Class AA/EQ Bioset facility receives outside sludge for treatment to Class AA/EQ on a pay-per-ton basis.

 

Ft. Meade, FL – Florida’s revised wastewater residuals regulations (F.A.C. 62-640) affect and limit the disposal options for municipalities producing biosolids. In response to the changing regulations, Schwing Bioset and BDS decided that the time was right to open a regional bioset facility that would accept outside biosolids and turn them into a Class AA/EQ material that has a wider array of beneficial reuse applications.

"Up till now, municipalities really only had one option when it came to biosolids. We saw this as great opportunity to innovate; an opportunity to break the mold and offer our clients with an alternative. In the most basic terms, our regional Class AA/EQ bioset facility allows wastewater treatment facilities to pay for biosolids processing without any capital outlay," stated Dan Anderson, General Manager of Biosolids Distribution Services.

The BDS regional Class AA/EQ bioset facility, located in Ft. Meade, Florida, accepts three primary types of material: cake sludge, septage and liquid sludge, and treats these materials using the patented Bioset process (liquid sludge and septage are dewatered before treated) which produces material that meets the highest quality standards set by the EPA, Class AA/EQ. Class AA/EQ material is exceptional quality and can be used as a fertilizer supplement or soil amendment.

"With significant advantages over other fertilizer products, the Class AA/EQ material created by the patented Bioset process is safe to be used as a fertilizer the next day," stated Anderson.

Florida’s revised regulations create challenges for any wastewater treatment facility whose biosolids do not meet Class A standards. Schwing Bioset and BDS are proud to offer these facilities with an alternative that is convenient and affordable and produces a sustainable end product for better reuse.

>>Read the article on PRWeb

Tags: Biosolids Processing, Bioset Process, Beneficial Reuse, Class 'AA' Biosolids, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Biosolids, Fertilizer, Biosolids Handling

Schwing Bioset Secures Long-Term Trial with City of St. Petersburg

 

Posted on January 9, 2013

City of St. Petersburg upgrades biosolids treatment to Class AA/EQ using Schwing Bioset’s patented Bioset process. 

St. Petersburg, FL – Until recently, the city of St Petersburg, Florida’s Southwest Water Reclamation Facility relied solely on anaerobic digesters to stabilize their biosolids. However, the 20+ year old digesters had not only aged to a point of disrepair, but were beginning to cause odor complaints from the neighbors. Hence, the city felt the pressure to take corrective action quickly.

Not only would rehabilitating the existing digesters entail a sizeable expense, but in the end, the digesters would still only be producing a Class B product that needed to be hauled off to land sites. In the past this was not an issue, but the new F.A.C. 62-640 rule in Florida is going to make Class B biosolids harder to reuse in a beneficial manner.

Schwing Bioset brought in their mobile Bioset System to the St Petersburg facility in June of 2011 for a 5-day trial. Demonstrating their ability to use a natural process that eliminates pathogens by elevating pH and temperature, they proved their ability to create a Class AA/EQ product from the facility’s biosolids that would meet the 62-640 rule in Florida.

After successfully providing Class AA within 24 hours of setting up the equipment for the trial, the city engaged in an active discussion with Schwing Bioset to extend their trial to a full year. In this time, Schwing Bioset would be contracted to install all equipment, make sure operators were trained properly, and modify the city’s existing operation for a year-long period. Presently the equipment is operating successfully, the digesters are off line, the odor complaints have been eliminated, and the plant is producing Class AA/EQ biosolids that are being beneficially reused locally.

 class A for the price of class B

Tags: Bioset Process, Bioset System, Class 'AA' Biosolids, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment

At Home on the Range

By Larry Trojak - October 2012

TPO

Though well past its boom times as a supplier of iron ore, the Iron Range area of northeast Minnesota enjoys a rich history and a fairly stable economy.

Three small Iron Range communities rely on the 0.5 mgd (design) wastewater treatment plant that bears their communities' names. The Coleraine-Bovey-Taconite Wastewater Treatment Facility nears its 25th anniversary having completed an expansion that includes a shift from Class B to Class A biosolids using a lime stabilization process.

The new process resolved a long-standing issue with meeting U.S. EPA standards for volatile solids reduction during the region's long, often frigid winters.

History of beneficial use

The CBT plant takes in wastewater at a main lift station with three Hydromatic pumps (Pentair) plus an overflow/bypass lift station with a Flygt pump (Xylem). From there, the flow enters an automatic bar screen (Parkson) and an aerated grit chamber that removes screenings and debris via a grit pump and classifier (Weir Specialty Pumps/WEMCO Pump).

Wastewater then passes through a Milltronics OCM III ultrasonic flowmeter (Siemens) to secondary treatment in two activated sludge tanks with Sanitaire fine-bubble diffusers (Xylem), and on to two secondary clarifiers (Walker Process). The waste activated sludge from the clarifiers is pumped to an aerobic digester with fine-bubble diffusers (also Sanitaire).

Secondary effluent is sent through a chlorine contact tank (Wallace & Tiernan), where chlorine and sulfur dioxide doses are fed automatically based on flow proportion. After dechlorination, the effluent travels to an effluent lift station (Hydromatic/Pentair) that pumps it 3.5 miles to the Swan River.

After a 40-day retention time, the solids are pumped to a belt filter press (Parkson) for dewatering and then to a reactor (Schwing Bioset) to produce Class A biosolids.

Before the recent expansion, dewatered biosolids were simply land-applied on area farms. "That was what we did from the time we opened in 1987 until about 1997, when the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) adopted the U.S. EPA regulations and changed the way we managed our biosolids," says Vernard Hawkinson, plant supervisor.

Part-time tundra

Iron Range winter temperatures can be challenging: In and around the town of Coleraine, average lows between November and February are near zero degrees F, and the thermometer once hit a record 51 below zero. For treatment plant operators like Hawkinson, that can be a logistical nightmare.

"The changes to federal EPA guidelines essentially made our whole biosolids process non-compliant during winter months," he says. "That process depends upon bacteria doing their job to reduce the volatile solids content in the biosolids to the level needed for producing a Class B biosolid.

"They do that just fine, except in extremely cold temperatures. When the rules were adopted, we had to meet the minimum 38 percent volatile solids reduction, or other options that were acceptable to meet the Vector Attraction Reduction rule. We were no longer in compliance during the winter, so we had to start taking steps to correct that."

One alternative approach CBT took was to stockpile the dewatered material during winter and then, when it thawed in spring, make it available to area farmers, who had to apply it to their land immediately and incorporate it into the soil. That too, had its problems, says Hawkinson.

"For one thing, because of the climate here, sometimes the biosolids piles would not thaw until the end of May, and most farmers wanted their planting to be done by then, not just starting," he says. "We did that for a few years before deciding it would be better to simply haul the liquid material to the Grand Rapids wastewater plant, or take the dewatered material to their landfill. Unfortunately, they were less-than-receptive to those plans on a long-term basis and we found ourselves back at square one."

Toward Class A

Hawkinson made other efforts to comply with the MPCA and EPA rules. Those included achieving the 38 percent volatile solids reduction using the approximate mass balance equation, and conducting a Bench Scale Analysis and Specific Oxygen Uptake Rate Analysis — all to no avail.

One solution that came to the forefront was to add a second digester. "That seemed like the only recourse we had at the time," says Hawkinson. "Adding a second tank would afford us the extra digestion time we would need to reduce the volatile solids. So we found an engineering firm to tackle the project.

"Their initial estimate came in at about $700,000 for the second digester, and the design process was started. Unfortunately, as the project progressed, additional site work was determined to be necessary which, through no fault of theirs, escalated the cost to roughly twice the original estimate."

bioset process

During that same time, Hawkinson attended a seminar put on by the Minnesota Rural Water Association at which representatives from Schwing Bioset presented their biosolids treatment process. Intrigued, Hawkinson spoke to a company representative at the show. After back-and-forth talks, Schwing Bioset estimated an installation at CBT would cost about $700,000 — the same as the original estimate for the digester — and the end product would be Class A biosolids.

"That made good sense to us on many levels, so we cancelled the digester design project and committed to Bioset," says Hawkinson.

 

Just add lime

The Bioset process mixes biosolids exiting the dewatering belt press (with a solids content of about 15 percent) with quicklime and sulfamic acid using a twin screw feeder. Then, using a Schwing KSP-5 pump, the mix is delivered under pressure through an insulated reactor. The enclosed process contains dust and odors while maintaining a constant temperature of 158 degrees F for at least 30 minutes to ensure that all pathogens are neutralized.

Working with the U.S. EPA Pathogen Equivalency Committee (PEC) through the Process to Further Reduce Pathogens (PFRP) treatment process in the 503 regulations, Schwing Bioset has obtained approval for the Bioset process to operate at 131 degrees F, provided the ammonium concentration within the reactor is above 0.5 mg/g dry weight. This offers a significant reduction in chemical usage from the standard 158 degrees F operating regime and translates into an approximate 30 percent reduction in operating costs.

The system at CBT also includes a recirculation feature in which biosolids that have not achieved the necessary temperature on startup are returned to the hopper for reprocessing. Upon exiting the Bioset process, now with a solids content in the 35 to 38 percent range, the Class A biosolids are discharged to a 48- by 75-foot storage building, constructed at the time of the biosolids upgrade. The plant produces about 35 dry tons of biosolids per year.

Popular with farmers

"We now have an excellent product with an effective acid neutralizing power of approximately 64 percent of pure lime," says Hawkinson. "Farmers in the area, who see the product as a great way to raise the pH levels of their soil, have agreed to take as much as we can produce.

"That's a far cry from having to actively seek a place where we could take it. Right now, we only need to rely upon the Bioset process for half the year — we get the volatile solids reduction we need in warmer weather. But it is an excellent alternative, and it has allowed us to create a Class A biosolid with the same outlay we would have incurred for the Class B product. It has really worked out well for us."

Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Wastewater Treatment, Lime Stabilization

Schwing Bioset Receives EPA Approval

Schwing Bioset's "Bioset" Process was approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a Process to Further Reduce Pathogens under certain conditions, which can be found in the attached document.

Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Class 'A' Materials, EPA, Wastewater Treatment

SBI Installs New Beneficial Reuse Bioset System in Northern Minn.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Schwing Bioset Announces New Beneficial Reuse Bioset System Installation in Northern Minnesota

The Bioset System will enable the Coleraine/Bovey/Taconite Joint Wastewater Commission to produce a soil amendment that meets the USEPA Class 'A' standards year round

Itasca County, MN- In Q3 of 2009 Schwing Bioset was awarded the contract to provide a Bioset System to the Coleraine/Bovey/Taconite Joint Wastewater Commission. This system was the lowest cost when compared to other technologies, and it produces a USEPA Class ‘A’ end product, unlike the other technologies that produced a USEPA Class ‘B’ material. The installation was completed in Q2 of 2011 and is fully operational.

The existing digesters could not meet the USEPA Class B standards in the winter months so the Commission needed to find a solution. After a reasonable amount of due diligence, the Commission secured the services of a local consulting engineering firm to explore alternatives for meeting the USEPA standards year round.

The engineer was faced with several challenges as they began their investigation. The plant was small, processing 0.5 MGD, and most available technologies would not scale down well or work well with intermittent biosolids processing. Another challenge was related to protracted winters and the need to find a place to store Class ‘B’ materials until the ground thawed and the biosolids could be land applied on the Commissions’ hay fields.

After considering options of a new digester, retrofitting the existing digester with heat exchangers, and reed beds, ultimately the Bioset process, Schwing Bioset’s alkaline stabilization process, was selected as the best available technology to meet these challenges.

About Schwing Bioset

For more than 25 years, Schwing Bioset has been helping wastewater treatment plants, mines and power generation customers by engineering material handling solutions. Schwing Bioset’s custom engineered solutions can be found in hundreds of wastewater treatment plants in North America as well as mines and tunnels around the world.

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Tags: Biosolids Processing, Bioset Process, Alkaline Stabilization, Class 'A' Materials, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment

Field Storage of Biosolids

Now that you’ve implemented your process (perhaps the Bioset Process?) for turning sludge into Class A biosolids, you’re probably faced with a new concern: what to do with all this high-quality fertilizer? If you’re providing it to farmers or citizens for land application, it might go out fast enough during some seasons of the year, but municipalities are generating wastewater year-round, even if the ground is frozen or fallow. The EPA provides guidelines for biosolid storage. Some of the primary concerns are:

  • Site Selection Considerations
  • Field Storage: Stockpiles
  • Field Storage: Constructed Facilities
  • Odor Prevention and Mitigation
  • Spill Prevention and Response
For site selection, you’ll want to consider some key factors:
  • Climate: How will weather affect the location? Do the prevailing winds blow odor toward a community? In many areas of the United States, land application of biosolids is severely limited from November through March.
  • Topography: Is the location regularly inundated by water or in a wetlands? Is it fairly level? Stockpiles should be near the top of slopes to minimize exposure to up-slope runoff. Storm water controls may be necessary. Storage locations should be in areas with adequate buffers.
  • Soil/Geology: Sites should not be located on excessively moist or wetland soils that regularly have standing water or excessive runoff after storms, or areas with loose soils (gravel or sand) that permit excessive infiltration.
  • Buffer Zones: Sites must comply with any federal (10 meters by the 503 rule), state, or local regulations regarding minimum buffer distances to waterways, homes, wells, property lines, roads, etc.
  • Odor Prevention/Aesthetics: Try to minimize visual and odor impact on residential areas. Storage during the summer poses a greater potential for development of unacceptable odors and requires a higher level of management.
  • Accessibility and Hauling Distance: How far do you have to haul sludge and/or biosolids? What’s the accessibility of the site during bad weather, or heavy traffic? Take note of weight restriction and other roadway limits along the haul route. Consider the traffic impact as well.
  • Property Issues: Ensure local zoning requirements and ordinances are met, and consider the relative security and liability associated with leasing versus ownership of the land. Any leases should extend for several years and preferably over the expected life of the facility.

Schwing Bioset’s advanced processing technology can help you understand and meet these requirements. To learn more, contact Schwing Bioset.

revinu fertilizer

Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Fertilizer