News from Schwing Bioset

Schwing Bioset Process Helps Community Maximize Beneficial Reuse

 

Written by Larry Trojak, Trojak Communications

Version also published in TPO Magazine, February 2019

 

Too Valuable to Waste

A lime stabilization process helps an Arkansas city meet its goal of producing Class A biosolids to enable the resumption of beneficial use. 

The strength and resilience of the wastewater treatment industry can often be found in the innovative solutions brought to bear to address the challenges it faces. And those solutions are not being employed solely by WWTPs in big cities or even larger municipalities, but often by small or mid-size operations — entities like the Russellville (Arkansas) Pollution Control Works Facility, for example. Faced with a situation in which they could no longer land-apply their Class B biosolids, plant officials looked for alternatives and opted to upgrade their operation to create a Class A product. In doing so, they’re finding value in their byproduct and have eliminated the need to simply waste it or — as they’ve reluctantly done in the past —  landfill it. A big solution from a smaller operation? Not surprising at all.

 

Snapshot: Russellville 

Located midway between Little Rock and Fort Smith, Ark., the city of Russellville is home to several major manufacturing facilities as well as the state’s only nuclear power plant. Owned and operated by Russellville City Corporation, the city’s Pollution Control Works Facility (PCWF) serves a population of 30,000 including all of Russellville and the nearby town of Dover. The wastewater collections system consists of roughly 170 miles of gravity sewer, 18 lift stations of various pumping capacities, and 14.1 miles of force main. Approximately 9,000 homes and businesses, and the service lines connecting these homes and businesses constitute an additional 129 miles of sewers — all of which terminate at the PCWF.

According to Randy Bradley, the facility’s wastewater operations manager, the plant has undergone periodic updates in its 55-year history, but really made a seismic shift in its approach a couple years back.

“Up to that point — and still to a large part today — we were a fairly typical operation,” he said. “The plant is designed for 7.3 mgd, and once wastewater gets here, it first goes through some Duperon bar screens to remove plastics and other products that can’t be broken down in normal treatment. After the screens, it undergoes grit removal and is pumped back through the plant where it goes through the primary clarifiers, then to one of three aeration basins — two 450,000 gallon tanks and one 850,000 gallon tank — and into the final clarifiers. A final stop in a chlorine contact chamber allows us to inject some sulfur dioxide to meet the non-detection limit of chlorine just before it is discharged.”

 

Change in Plans 

In the past, the facility’s primary sludge and the waste activated sludge from the aeration basins was pumped into a digester, then through a belt press for dewatering and deposited onto trucks that would take it for land application on several pieces of permitted property.

“However, in 2014, land ownership changed on one of those parcels and the new owners no longer wanted sludge on their land. So, we lost that piece of property, which was a substantial loss in available area, and were restricted solely to the parcel we owned. At that time, we were generating about 2400 lbs. per day of the Class B biosolids. Ordinarily, we might have been able to make that work, but, at the time, we had just added another aeration basin and clarifier to the front end of the process, so we knew we were going to be generating more solids. Something had to be done.”

Schwing Bioset Class A Biosolids Process 

Seeking Alternatives

Faced with that situation, the facility conducted an intensive study to look at the options available to them. Those included: increasing the digester volumes or improving the existing ones, composting, and the use of sludge dryers.

“What turned us off to drying the sludge was the significant initial investment,” said Bradley. “And, as I talked to people at other facilities, I discovered that there is a fairly high cost for maintenance on that equipment — that’s a one-two punch we didn’t need. And when we went to a northwest Arkansas composting facility, we found that solution to be very labor-intensive and would demand much more acreage than we had available. Couple that with the fact that we weren’t certain we could ensure a reliable availability of the organic material needed for the process and it was no longer a serious choice. We needed another viable option and learned about it almost in our backyard.”

 

A Good Tip

At about that same time, the Russellville facility was encountering issues preventing them from maintaining the necessary retention time in their digester to meet Class B specifications, forcing them to truck their biosolids to a nearby landfill. It was a situation that ran counter to everything Bradley and his team stood for.

“We absolutely hate to have to send anything to landfill, and not just because of the costs involved in doing so — though those costs are substantial,” he said. “Landfills have space issues of their own and this is material that can ultimately serve a better benefit. But yet, we were at a point where we had no choice, so we contracted with Denali Water Solutions (Russellville, Ark.) to haul off our sludge. It just so happened that they’d been working on some potential projects with Tom Welch, a regional manager from Schwing Bioset, Inc. and told us about the Schwing Bioset process for creating a Class A biosolid.  After contacting SBI, we were intrigued enough that I, along with Lance Bartlett our utility engineer, and Chesley Jackson my senior operator, took a trip to St. Petersburg, Florida to look at their process in operation and saw the possibilities it held for us.”

In the context of what PCWF’s current solution looks like, the Schwing Bioset process to which Bradley refers, starts by taking biosolids that have been dewatered in a BDP 1.5-meter Model 3DP three-belt press and gravity thickener (at PCWF, dewatered to about 18% dry solids) and dropped into a hopper with a twin-screw mixer in which quicklime and sulfamic acid are added and blended. The mixing effort helps alleviate issues such as unreacted lime in the final product — and the costs associated with it. A Schwing KSP-25 piston pump then sends the blended material into the 35 ft. long reactor where temps in the 140° F range from the acid/quicklime mixture raise the pH level, stabilize the biosolids mixture, and produce the Class A product PCWF needs.

Schwing Bioset Pump and Reactor 

Built for Expansion 

Getting to the point where the Schwing Bioset process was fully theirs and fully online, was something of a departure for all parties involved. According to SBI’s Tom Welch, in a deal that involved the plant’s owners, SBI and Denali Water Solutions, a mobile Bioset system was brought to Russellville to initiate a pilot program in order to prove out the process there.

“The final agreement involved us leasing our mobile Bioset system to Denali which they, in turn, operated for the facility, disposing of the material at an onsite dirt yard. Denali charged City Corporation, the owners and operators of the PCWF, a monthly fee to cover the labor, operation, and lease of the Bioset equipment. However, after the final equipment was purchased and the installation was nearing completion, facility management determined that they had the comfort level to operate the system and manage the disposal of the product themselves. That made good sense since bringing that process in-house would save them a large operating cost.”

Bradley added that the installation process itself was relatively quick and efficient. “Largely due to the help SBI provided — technicians spent the first two weeks with us — the install was very smooth,” he said. “During the design phase, we gave Ft. Smith-based Hawkins-Weir Engineering a projection for where we might be in 10-20 years and they designed the facility for future area development. As a result, the Bioset reactor is sized to handle two belt presses, so, if growth warrants it, we can just move another belt press in without skipping a beat.”

 

Great for the Soil

PCWF went online with the new system in 2016 and has been processing, on average, 81,000 lbs. of Class A biosolids per month since. Once the material exits the Bioset process, it is loaded onto dual axle dump trucks and taken out to an area adjacent to the plant, spread out using a front-end loader and allowed to dry. Once dry, it is moved into piles and — after periodic testing for salmonella — given away to area farmers. 

“We have several farmers competing for it at times, which is great for us,” said Bradley. “While the material has some nutrient value, its ability to boost the pH of soil is its real selling point. Almost all the soil in Arkansas is pretty acidic, so it welcomes that pH boost.

Next spring we are looking at possibly doing some type of bid for it. Simply recouping some of our costs — even enough to pay for fuel for the loader, example — would be a nice bonus. But right now just having someone haul it off for us is and make good use of it a huge improvement over what we did in the past. This entire project could not have gone better nor had better results.”

 

Contact us to find out how we can help your plant too!

 

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Tags: Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Lime Stabilization, Beneficial Reuse, Bioset Process

Recover Phosphorus from Waste Stream for Beneficial Reuse

 

Posted by Kelly Kramer

At wastewater plants utilizing anaerobic digestion, Struvite commonly forms and creates issues with pipes clogging and equipment being damaged as a result of scaling.  Additionally, tanks can accumulate Struvite, which requires periodic removal and creates an additional expense to plant operations.

Schwing Bioset Struvite Recovery Bio-Stru Product

Schwing Bioset’s Nutrient recovery system recovers Ortho Phosphate and Ammonia Nitrogen from wastewater while offering great benefits to the treatment plant, not only by significantly reducing phosphorus in the waste stream, but also preventing unwanted scaling and accumulations, and creating a valuable end product.  The phosphorus forms a stable Struvite crystal that can be marketed and sold for beneficial reuse, thus keeping excess phosphorus out of the local waterways and helping close the phosphorus recycling loop. 

The article, "The Six Natural Resources Most Drained by Our 7 Billion People," posted on The Guardian, discusses phosphorus and provides a resourceful link to learn more about this essential nutrient and it's role in food production.

To learn more about how Schwing Bioset can help your plant with Nutrient Management, visit our website, call us at (715) 247-3433, or email us at marketing@schwingbioset.com.

 

Nutrient Management Air Stripper Schwing Bioset 

 

Download Our Nutrient Recovery Brochure

 

 

Tags: Phosphorus Removal, Struvite Recovery, Nutrient Recovery, Beneficial Reuse

When WWTP Says "No Tanks," Innovative Bioset Process Fills the Gap

 

Schwing Bioset Application Report 17, St. Petersburg, Florida

Written by Larry Trojak, Trojak Communications

Version also published in WE&T Magazine, November 2013

 

Pumps_Snapshot

 

Wear is the unflagging enemy of every wastewater treatment plant. Plant operators can defend against it to the best of their ability; but in the end, time will win out, resulting in breakdowns and the occasional interruption in service. To cope with such occurrences, forward-thinking plants will always have a solid contingency plan in place. For the Southwest Water Reclamation Facility (WRF) serving the Water Resources Department’s southwest sector (including St. Petersburg, FL), their contingency - designed to deal with a pair of worn, aging digester tanks - involved bypassing the tanks entirely and processing biosolids through a Bioset sludge treatment process. Doing so is not only helping them avoid an operational nightmare and additional maintenance and expense, it is allowing them to improve the by-product of that biosolids operation - all at a time when costs to land-apply their “standard” product have skyrocketed. Timing, it seems, really is everything.

 

Decades of Wear

Originally built in 1955 as a four million gallon per day (mgd) facility, the Southwest Water Reclamation Facility (WRF) was literally replaced at the same location with a 20 mgd plant in 1978. It is one of four which serve the greater St. Petersburg area: Plant #1, for the southeast section of the area which includes downtown St. Petersburg; Plant #2, to serve the northeast section of town; Plant #3, for the northwest section of the area and the beach communities; and Plant #4, for the southwest section of St. Petersburg, as well as the incorporated towns of Tierra Verde and Gulf Port. According to Ken Wise, chief plant operator for the Southwest WRF, volumes at each plant are pretty much equal.

“Plant #1 is called the Albert Whitted WRF and it’s a little smaller since there are fewer residents downtown than in other parts of the city,” he says. “But each of the other three plants are 20 mgd facilities and treat roughly the same amount of sewage. Since the upgrade in 1978 we’ve all been running an anaerobic digestion process and creating a Class B product from the biosolids. For us, that approach worked well until time caught up with us in the form of badly-worn digester tanks which were causing odor issues for an adjacent college and residential developments in the area.”

Given that two of the tanks were built in 1955 with the original plant, and the third was added with the expansion more than 35 years ago, the wear factor is not surprising. Wise says other plants in the area were also seeing failures in both the covers and in their structures as a whole.

“We hadn’t had a failure yet, but the Water Resources Department was spending a good deal of money on
upkeep with us,” says Wise. “Under normal circumstances that would have probably sufficed and bought us a few more years. However, due to changing Florida regulations surrounding the land application practices of the Class B biosolids they were producing at the time, the department started seriously looking into alternative biosolids treatment technologies hoping to avoid repairing something that was not only at the end of its life, but also might not be a fit for that new effort.”

 

Repeat Success

Bioset_Snapshot

To find that solution, the department looked at all possible alternatives, an initiative that included conducting pilot projects with various technologies at other locations in the city. One of those, at the Whitted plant, involved installing the Bioset Process sludge treatment system which uses a combination of pH and heat to stabilize the biosolids, thereby eliminating the need for digesters. 

In addition to being extremely low maintenance and operator friendly, Wise says that it had proven quick to implement and very successful there. “Ultimately the decision was made to install another system from Schwing Bioset here at Southwest,” he says. “Installation took place in July of last year (2012) and we were online by August.”

The installation, he adds, went smoothly, despite the fact that the Bioset Process had to be made to fit within the confines of an existing section of the plant rather than in a totally new site.

“The Bioset crew really worked with us to maximize use of the space we had and minimize disruption,” he says. “As a result, we probably have one of the few Bioset systems in which the reactor is raised some ten feet off the floor to fit with an existing opening. Now, sludge comes off the belt presses, is mixed with quicklime and sulfamic acid, and is pumped up into the reactor, where it spends at least 40 minutes at 135°F and achieves a pH of 12.5, before being discharged to the trailers.”

The newly-stabilized sludge is kept in the trailers on-site for 24 hours, at which point a sample is taken to ensure the pH is still in excess of 11.5 as required by Federal regulations. Since going online with the Bioset Process, Wise says the pH has never been less than 12.5.

 

Added Benefits

In addition to the elimination of virtually any odor and the complaints associated with it, it is the end product of the Bioset process - now a Class AA biosolid (the Florida equivalent of Class A-EQ) - which is the real benefit for Wise and his operation.

“In the past, our Class B material was suitable for use on sod farms and pasture lands, but because of its designation would have to be set back from any kind of food crops. By contrast, the Class AA product we get off the Bioset Process can be applied on golf courses, pastures, food crops - pretty much anywhere. In addition, because of a recent change in regulations, the other three area plants still generating the Class B biosolid are now paying an extra $300 more per trailer, while our costs dropped $100 per load. Granted, by adding the lime, the volumes are up about 10%, so the number of trailers we are shipping has increased. But even with that added into the equation, we are still saving 40 percent when compared to the Class B and have a much more usable product,” says Wise.

All of the Class AA material generated at the plant is currently either land applied at a site within an hour of the plant or sold as fertilizer to the local agricultural market. The previous Class B, by comparison, was hauled to sites more than three-hours away where it often found limited use.

 

Tanks for the Memories

The St. Petersburg WWTP has proven to be something of a case study in how to best deal with a set of unfortunate, challenging circumstances. Faced with a pair of failing digesters that were going to require a significant investment to rebuild, and which were creating odor issues for nearby residents, businesses, and students - the plant was able to solve the problems by abandoning the existing tanks and by adopting new technology in their operation. That solution from Schwing Bioset was implemented for less money than the tank rebuild project would have cost, it eliminated the odor issue, and includes the added benefit of processing cake directly to a Class AA biosolid (and gain more flexibility in the beneficial reuse of the end product), resulting in substantial net savings across the board.

"Since bringing in the Bioset System things have definitely settled down around here,” said Wise. “It’s been a great solution for us.” And, it would seem, all the issues created by the failing tanks are just fading memories.

 

To download the entire #17 application report for St. Petersburg, Florida, click here.

To learn more about Schwing Bioset, our products and engineering, or this project specifically, please call 715-247-3433, email marketing@schwingbioset.com, view our website, or find us on social media.

To view a version of this story published in WE&T Magazine, click here.

 

Tags: Class 'A' Biosolids, Bioset Process, Bioset System, Beneficial Reuse, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Fertilizer

Where Should the "Stuff" Go - Part 2

 

Written by Scott Springer, Director of Sales and Marketing, Schwing Bioset, Inc.

May 29, 2015

Not in My Back Yard vs Solutions – An open discussion on disposal or re-use of Biosolids

Going back to the previous blog post discussing disposal or re-use of Biosolids, again, some of the environmentalists claim that the current US Government regulations (EPA Part 503) on Biosolids is either outdated based on the chemicals in today’s world or that there is an EPA conspiracy to hide the scientific facts from the public, and that somehow, the operators, equipment, and services people are behind it.  When Schwing Bioset posts on the subject, the reply from others is often that we only care about $$$ and profits at the expense of the health of people, animals, etc.

Schwing Bioset typically replies in this manner:

If there is or was a conspiracy, Schwing Bisoet has never been part of it.  I realize that the suppliers and solution providers are easy targets, because we are accessible, but any anger should really be directed at the Government agencies in charge. 
 
If the regulations are truly outdated, then the environmentalist effort needs to be to get the laws changed, not attack the people and companies who are following the current laws.
 
Also, I am not naive to believe that there are no companies out there with less than perfect ethics.  There are documented incidents of some service providers dumping sludge (treated or untreated) where they should not to scam profits.  I agree that there should be anger against these types of companies, but please don’t lump us all into that category.  There are a lot of good people and companies in this industry that want to provide a better world for all of us.  And this is business, even the good people need to make a fair profit in order to continue developing new and better solutions.

 

Schwing Bioset’s Bioset Process achieves Class ‘AA’ Biosolids via the time vs. temperature equation and pH adjustment per the EPA 503 regulations.  From start-up to shut-down, the Bioset Process remains an easy to operate system that is reliable, clean (enclosed), and odor controlled.  With ever-rising energy costs, the Bioset Process stands out as an economical method to producing Class ‘AA’ Biosolids.

For questions or more information on Biosolids or our Bioset Process, please leave a comment on this blog post and we will be sure to reply or contact you, or send an email to marketing@schwingbioset.com.

  

BeneficialReuse_2_4

 

 

Tags: Bioset Process, Beneficial Reuse, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment

Where Should the "Stuff" Go - Part 1

 

Written by Scott Springer, Director of Sales and Marketing, Schwing Bioset, Inc.

May 27, 2015

Not in My Back Yard vs Solutions – An open discussion on disposal or re-use of Biosolids

The internet is a wonderful thing – sometimes.  Information is almost limitless, as are opinions on virtually any topic.  While it does not compare in magnitude to the doings of a Kardashian, there is a lot of vigorous debate on the topic of how Biosolids should be disposed of.   These debates play out on Twitter, LinkedIn Group chats, and local newspaper e-article comment areas, to name a few.  Some of the debates are polite, informational, and serve some purpose to educate those reading the content.  Others get nasty, personal, and are embarrassing.  In my opinion, these biosolids discussions tend to put people into one of 5 camps:

1. Environmentalists / Scientists

2. Engineers / Consultants / Suppliers to the Wastewater Treatment Industry (which Schwing Bioset would fall into)

3. Farmers

4. Citizens

5. Internet Trolls (a term I learned that basically describes people who just like to take out their frustrations on anyone and everyone on the internet)

 

Here is one trend that I have observed in these exchanges:

Several of the environmentalists claim that the waste treatment process is inadequate to remove all dangerous elements from the waste stream.  They will list dozens of chemicals that are put into the waste stream from pharmaceuticals (consumed or not) that we flush down the toilet every day to chemicals that are in the waste stream of industrial plants.

Schwing Bioset typically replies in this manner:

I don’t have an advanced degree in the sciences, so there is no use in me debating this point.  I do know (with my engineering degree) that:

       i.      Not every waste treatment plant has input that includes all of the chemicals on the list, especially the smaller to mid-size plants.  Some of the industrial plants have their own treatment or pre-treatment plants and don’t send any waste to the municipality.

       ii.      Some of the levels of these chemicals get into the parts per billion and trillion – which may or may not be harmful to people, animals, or plants.  But the reality is that some of these are way below the detectable limit of most analysis techniques available.  A lot of work needs to be done on this exhaustive list to determine what is really dangerous, and how to either remove it or prevent it from getting into the waste stream.

For more thoughts on ‘where the stuff should go,’ check back to the Schwing Bioset website soon.

For questions or more information on Biosolids or our Bioset Process, please leave a comment on this blog post and we will be sure to reply or contact you, or send an email to marketing@schwingbioset.com.

 

 ProductSpreader

Tags: Bioset Process, Beneficial Reuse, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment

Schwing Bioset, Inc. Expands its Leadership Position as the Class A/AA Biosolids Solution Provider

 

Published on April 14, 2015 (Somerset, WI)

Schwing Bioset, Inc. has completed another successful Beneficial Reuse installation.  The City of Immokalee, Florida, chose Schwing Bioset to provide not only its Best in Class equipment, but design and build capabilities as well.

The heart of the system is the patented Bioset process and reactor that converts raw sludge into Class AA Biosolids, making it ready for easy land application.  Licensed as a fertilizer in the state of Florida, the Class AA product produced by the Bioset process is a highly marketable and sought after product.  Millions of tons have been produced and beneficially reused by the Bioset process. 

Taking advantage of some of the other high quality products Schwing Bioset offers, Immokalee integrated their Twin Piston Pump and Dewatering Screw Press into their design.

The Immokalee Water & Sewer District Executive Director, Eva Deyo, is very pleased with the system.  “The project came in under budget and went from concept to completion much quicker than other options.  As promised, the Schwing Bioset solution has proven to be easy to operate for our staff and very cost effective to operate, and the end product is exceptional,” said Deyo.  

Schwing Bioset Regional Sales Manager, Tom Welch, is thrilled with the results of the project.  “The City of Immokalee was tremendous to work with throughout the entire process.  Their vision and understanding of the value that the Schwing Bioset solution offered was evident throughout.  They realized after investigating numerous options that you don’t have to break the bank to get state-of-the-art technology,” said Welch.

“The experience of our Design, Engineering, and Project Management Teams has really shown during the execution of this fast track project.  The Schwing Bioset Team has executed on well over $150M in projects, with 2015 proving to be our biggest year ever,” said Tom Anderson, Owner and President of Schwing Bioset.

About Schwing Bioset

For more than 25 years, Schwing Bioset has been helping wastewater treatment plants, mines, and power generation customers by engineering material handling solutions. Schwing Bioset’s custom engineered solutions can be found in hundreds of wastewater treatment plants in North America as well as mines and tunnels around the world.

For questions or more information, please contact Schwing Bioset at 715-247-3433 or marketing@schwingbioset.com, or visit the website at http://www.schwingbioset.com.

SBI Logo Small resized 600

Tags: Bioset Process, Piston Pumps, Municipal Biosolids, Beneficial Reuse, Class 'AA' Biosolids, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment, Fertilizer, Recycled Waste, Schwing Bioset, Municipal, Screw Press

Schwing Bioset and Biosolids Distribution Services Open First Owned and Operated Regional Class AA/EQ Bioset Facility

Posted on August 28, 2013
The recently opened BDS and Schwing Bioset Regional Class AA/EQ Bioset facility receives outside sludge for treatment to Class AA/EQ on a pay-per-ton basis.

 

Ft. Meade, FL – Florida’s revised wastewater residuals regulations (F.A.C. 62-640) affect and limit the disposal options for municipalities producing biosolids. In response to the changing regulations, Schwing Bioset and BDS decided that the time was right to open a regional bioset facility that would accept outside biosolids and turn them into a Class AA/EQ material that has a wider array of beneficial reuse applications.

"Up till now, municipalities really only had one option when it came to biosolids. We saw this as great opportunity to innovate; an opportunity to break the mold and offer our clients with an alternative. In the most basic terms, our regional Class AA/EQ bioset facility allows wastewater treatment facilities to pay for biosolids processing without any capital outlay," stated Dan Anderson, General Manager of Biosolids Distribution Services.

The BDS regional Class AA/EQ bioset facility, located in Ft. Meade, Florida, accepts three primary types of material: cake sludge, septage and liquid sludge, and treats these materials using the patented Bioset process (liquid sludge and septage are dewatered before treated) which produces material that meets the highest quality standards set by the EPA, Class AA/EQ. Class AA/EQ material is exceptional quality and can be used as a fertilizer supplement or soil amendment.

"With significant advantages over other fertilizer products, the Class AA/EQ material created by the patented Bioset process is safe to be used as a fertilizer the next day," stated Anderson.

Florida’s revised regulations create challenges for any wastewater treatment facility whose biosolids do not meet Class A standards. Schwing Bioset and BDS are proud to offer these facilities with an alternative that is convenient and affordable and produces a sustainable end product for better reuse.

>>Read the article on PRWeb

Tags: Biosolids Processing, Bioset Process, Beneficial Reuse, Class 'AA' Biosolids, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Biosolids, Fertilizer, Biosolids Handling

Schwing featured on 21st Century Business TV Series

21st Century Business

 

November 12, 2009 - CNBC                                           

Click Link for Airing Schedule - http://www.21cbtv.com/clearance/2024.pdf 

Boca Raton, FL, --- Multi-Media Productions (USA), Inc. announces that Schwing Bioset, Inc. will be featured on 21st Century Business.

Schwing Bioset, Inc. (SBI) was created in 2006 by spinning off the Material Handling Division of Schwing America into its own company. The new company was created to better focus on meeting the unique needs of the wastewater treatment industry. In addition, the spin off afforded Schwing Bioset, Inc. the ability to leverage its two-decades of successful wastewater treatment installations at Schwing America into an aggressive pursuit of alternative "green" solutions in the wastewater treatment industry.

In 2006, SBI opened a new 20,000 square foot engineering and manufacturing facility in Somerset, WI in order to rapidly expand its service offerings. The "Bioset Process" and Fluid Bed Drying technology are two examples of Schwing Bioset's commitment to delivering innovative and environmentally friendly solutions to the wastewater treatment industry.

SBI's Project Management and Fluid Bed Drying teams remain in their respective locations of Danbury, CT and Houston, TX. Schwing Bioset's mission is simple, to become the market leader in the biosolids  and beneficial reuse industry.

For more information, visit www.schwingbioset.com

JL Haber, Vice President of Programming at Multi Media Productions, adds, "Schwing Bioset is an exciting company with a unique mission. We are excited to have them as a guest on our program."

About 21st Century Business

21st Century Business airs on CNBC and the Fox Business Network as paid programming. 21st Century Business may also be viewed through video on demand via www.21cbtv.com. The 21CBTV Series is also available at more than 90 prestigious universities, including Carnegie Mellon University, Howard University, Dartmouth College, and Georgetown University.

For specific market-by-market air dates and times, please e-mail Moniqueh@mmpusa.com. For more information, please visit www.21cbtv.com.

Tags: Bioset Process, Fluid Bed Drying, Beneficial Reuse, Biosolids, Schwing Bioset