News from Schwing Bioset

Myra Falls Mine Opening Again with Updated Paste Pumps

 

Written by John Brown, April 2018

The Myra Falls mine, owned by Nyrstar, is located in a provincial park in central Vancouver Island (British Columbia) and is linked only by a 90 km asphalt road to the port of Campbell River. In 2002, Myra Falls constructed a paste plant to manage their tailings that included two KSP-110V(HD)L pumps with a maximum capacity of 82 m3/hr at 8.62 MPa. Each pump was equipped with hydraulic units that had a capacity of 600 HP.

For years the KSP 110’s had been pumping paste-tailings material nearly 2 miles to either a surface tailings pond or back underground to the stopes through an eight-inch pipe without any problems. Myra Falls relied on Schwing Bioset for over seven years of operation and service of the pump systems.  Economic conditions then led to the suspension of mining operations which are now scheduled to resume in 2018.

To keep the operation running as smoothly as before, an engineering analysis was performed on the existing facilities to evaluate the equipment and processes in place.  As part of this analysis, Nyrstar decided to increase the capacity of their operation by replacing the KSP 110 pumps with new KSP 140’s that provide nearly 30% more capacity and to recondition the existing power units.  The two power packs for the KSP 110’s were sent back to the Schwing Bioset factory and these 15 year old power units will be updated with the newest hydraulic designs and componentry.

The new KSP 140’s will also be using Schwing Bioset’s proprietary Ideal Control Circuit (ICC), which reduces paste flow velocity changes at the end of each pumping stroke to mitigate the pressure surges that can be seen in paste pipelines. This internal dampening system is achieved with simple position sensors and programming and avoids the complexities of other dampening systems available on the market.

The project is expected to be completed in July of 2018. For more info on our Mining Pumps, contact John Brown or visit http://www.schwingbioset.com/mining-pumps.

 

Schwing Bioset Piston Pump for Myra Falls Mine

(Photo shows one of the Myra Falls pumps in the Schwing Bioset facility being prepped to ship to the job site).

 

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Tags: Piston Pumps, Mining Pumps, Paste Pumps

Metro WWTP Upgrades Piston Pump Sludge Flow Measurement System

 

Written by Chuck Wanstrom, March 2018

 

The Metro WWTP, operated by the Metropolitan Council of Environmental Services (MCES), located in St. Paul, MN, has an average daily flow of 215 million gallons per day (MGD) of incoming flow. Prior to 2004 the plant had been utilizing multi-hearth incinerators to burn their biosolids. A new incineration facility utilizing fluid bed technology was commissioned in 2004 and included a dewatered biosolids storage and feed system supplied by Schwing Bioset, Inc (SBI).

The feed system included four sliding frame silos providing intermediate storage of dewatered cake to provide a buffer in centrifuge and incinerator operations. Each of the four sliding frame silos were equipped with two KSP 45V(HD)L piston pumps to transport the dewatered cake to the incinerators. Each piston pump is equipped with a dual discharge to split the biosolids flow to multiple incinerator injection points, as well as a Sludge Flow Measuring System (SFMS) to measure within 5% the amount of biosolids being pumped into the incinerator. The SFMS is a critical piece of the operation as this is required to satisfy US EPA reporting requirements. This proven equipment configuration and flow measuring system has been utilized at numerous other facilities across North America for over 20 years.

Schwing Bioset has recently developed an improvement in its SFMS to reduce the possible sources of error that can be introduced with variations in pumping speed during operation. This next generation of SFMS results in an even more accurate means of recording and reporting biosolids flow and is further evidence of Schwing Bioset’s commitment to developing and improving its technology to better serve its family of customers. After nearly 15 years of reliable service, the Metro plant, and its continuing commitment to excellence, is currently in the process of performing upgrades throughout its Solids Management Building and is converting its piston pumps to this next generation of flow measurement. Schwing Bioset looks forward to many more years of supporting MCES and to the continued success of this impressive facility.

If you are currently using an SBI pump equipped with our SFMS and would like more information on upgrading your equipment to the latest generation of flow measurement, please contact us at (715) 247-3433 or schwingbioset.com/contact-us.

 

WWTP Schwing Bioset Piston Pump

 

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Tags: Piston Pumps, Biosolids, Wastewater Treatment Plant

Schwing Bioset is Offering Two KSP Pump Training Seminars in 2018

 

Posted by Kelly Kramer, January 2018

 

The Schwing Bioset Service Team is excited to announce that it will be holding two KSP Pump Training Seminars in 2018!

Both sessions will be in May at our facility in Fort Myers, Florida. Attendees will join our instructors for classroom and hands-on KSP Pump Training and learn how to properly use, maintain, and troubleshoot pump equipment. They will have the chance to learn more about basic hydraulics, poppet valves, power packs, setting pressures, screw feeders, troubleshooting, and more!

The regular cost to register is $1295, but if you register early (by February 14th) you can receive $245 off of your registration fee. Our classes do fill up, so please reserve your spot now. 

The deadline to register for the spring seminars is March 23rd. You can get more information and registration forms at the link below.

For questions or to register, please contact Ashley at ahinrichs@schwingbioset.com or (715) 247-3433. 

 Click Here for Info on our   KSP Pump Training 

 

Schwing Bioset Pump Training Seminar    

 

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Tags: Announcements, Events, KSP Service Seminar, Pumps

Schwing Bioset is Exhibiting at Several Events in 2018

 

Schwing Bioset, Inc. is excited to be attending and exhibiting at several conventions and expos throughout 2018. If you'd like to meet with one of our team members at a show, please email us and we'll put you in touch with the appropriate person.

Below is a list of water, wastewater, and mining events that we are scheduled to attend for the coming year. We will keep this information updated throughout the year. One new show for us is the AMTA Membrane Technology Conference in West Palm Beach.

For more than 30 years, Schwing Bioset, Inc. has been helping wastewater treatment plants, mines, and power generation customers by engineering solids handling solutions. Schwing Bioset’s custom-engineered solutions can be found in hundreds of wastewater treatments plants in North America, as well as mines and tunnels around the world.

Our products include, among others, sludge, industrial, and tunnel piston pumps, dewatering screw presses, sliding frame and push floor silos, fluid bed drying products, container wagons, Bioset process equipment for Class A biosolids, phosphorus removal and struvite recovery, and soil conditioners. We also offer spare parts, equipment maintenance services, and customer pump training. 

Read about our newest product, our Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) Process Technology, and other products hereand then stop by one of our booths to learn more! 

Show Dates Place
Michigan AWWA / MWEA Joint Expo Feb. 6-7 Lansing Center, Lansing, MI
Pacific Water Conference Feb. 7-8 Hawaii Convention Center, Honolulu, HI
MWWA (Manitoba) Annual Conference Feb. 25-28 Keystone Centre, Brandon, MB
SME Annual Conference & Expo Feb. 25-28 Minneapolis Convention Center, Minneapolis, MN
MRWA Water & WW Technical Conference March 6 River's Edge Convention Center, St. Cloud, MN
AMTA Membrane Technology Conference & Expo  March 12-16 Palm Beach Co. Conv. Center, West Palm Beach, FL
Florida Water Resources Conference FWRC April 15-18 Ocean Center, Daytona Beach, FL
CWEA 2018 Annual Conference April 17-20 Sacramento Convention Center, Sacramento, CA
Exposición Internacional Minera April 18-20 Maverick Factor, San Juan, Argentina
Texas Water - AWWA Texas Section April 23-26 Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio, TX
AWW & WEA Arkansas April 29 - May 2 Hot Springs Conv. Center, Hot Springs, AR
AZ Water Association Annual Conference & Expo May 2-4 Phoenix Convention Center, Phoenix, AZ
CIM 2018 Convention May 6-8 Vancouver Convention Centre, Vancouver, BC
WEF Residuals & Biosolids Conference May 15-18 Phoenix Convention Center, Phoenix, AZ
WEF Nutrient Removal & Recovery Conference June 18-21 Hilton Midtown, Raleigh, NC
KY-TN Water Professionals Conference July 8-11 Music City Center, Nashville, TN
OAWWA/OWEA One Water Ohio Aug. 27-30 Columbus Convention Center, Columbus, OH
WaterJAM Sept. 10-13 Virginia Beach Convention Center, Virginia Beach, VA
WEFTEC 2018 Sept. 29 - Oct. 3 Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, New Orleans, LA
WWOA Annual Conference Oct. 16-19 Grand Geneva Resort, Lake Geneva, WI
PNCWA 2018 Oct. 21-24 Boise Center, Boise, ID

 

Schwing Bioset 2018 Tradeshows WEFTEC

 

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Tags: Announcements, Events, WEFTEC, Expos

A Pump for Growth at the Pinos Altos Paste Plant

 

Written by John Brown and Jose Luis Diaz

The Pinos Altos mine is located in northern Mexico in the mountains west of Chihuahua and is owned by Agnico Eagle. With more than eight years of operation utilizing both conventional open pit and underground paste backfill mining techniques, the mine now is set to increase its underground production to its design capacities. The major components of this expansion include increasing the hoisting capacity as well as increasing the capacity of the paste plant. The key element in the expansion of the paste plant is the piston pump utilized to transport the paste back underground to the stopes.

Pinos Altos Mine
 

Pinos Altos has been successfully using a Schwing Bioset KSP 140 pump with a capacity 80 m3/hr since the inception of the project nearly a decade ago. The solid performance and low operating and maintenance requirements made the selection of a larger KSP 220 piston pump from Schwing Bioset for the plant expansion project an easy decision.

Schwing Bioset delivered the new KSP 220 pump and a 1,000HP hydraulic power unit in July 2017. Our technicians returned to Pinos Altos in November 2017 to commission the new equipment to complete this phase of the project. Design discharge capacity for the paste plant has increased to 110 m3/hr and operates with extremely high efficiencies. The new pump is equipped with Schwing Bioset’s proprietary Ideal Control Circuit (ICC), which reduces paste flow velocity changes at the end of each pumping stroke to mitigate the pressure surges commonly seen in paste pipelines and provide a more smoothly operating pumping system.

Pinos Altos Pump 1
 

The new pump transfers paste approximately 2.1 km underground at which point it is distributed to the appropriate stopes up to another 600 meters at an angle of inclination up to 32 degrees. This system is remotely controlled from the existing operations room on the surface and has allowed the operating capacity of the paste plant to increase by 30%, meeting all the projections from the beginning of the project.

To find out about our mining pump solutions, contact us or learn more here.

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Una bomba para el crecimiento - planta de pasta de Pinos Altos

La mina de Pinos Altos localizada al Norte de México en las montañas del Estado de Chihuahua perteneciente al grupo canadiense Agnico Eagle, por cerca de ocho años de operación ha utilizado ambas técnicas de minado, tajo abierto convencional y sistemas subterráneos de relleno hidráulico. La mina fue diseñada para incrementar su producción subterránea a sus capacidades inicialmente establecidas. La mayor razón de esta expansión incluye el incremento de capacidad operativa como también el incremento de producción de la planta de pastas. El elemento clave en expandir la producción de la planta de pastas en el pasado ha sido la utilización de la bomba de pistones para el transporte de la pasta de regreso al subterráneo de las cámaras.

Pinos Altos ha estado utilizando la bomba Schwing Bioset modelo KSP 140 con una capacidad de 80 m3/hr desde hace una década. El sólido rendimiento, el bajo costo operativo y de mantenimiento hicieron de la selección del modelo KSP 220 para la expansión de la planta de pastas, una decisión no muy difícil de tomar.

Schwing Bioset hizo entrega de la nueva bomba KSP 220 con su respectiva unidad hidráulica de 1000HP de potencia en Junio del 2017. Nuestros técnicos retornaron a Pinos Altos en noviembre de 2017 para el arranque y comisión de esta fase del proyecto. El diseño de la capacidad de descarga de la planta de pastas fue incrementada a 110 m3/h, operando con gran precisión y eficiencia. La nueva bomba equipada con un sistema propiedad Schwing Bioset llamado Circuito Ideal De Control o como sus siglas en ingles “Ideal control Circuit (ICC)”, el cual reduce los cambios de velocidad de flujo de pasta al final de cada golpe de bombeo, mitigando de esta forma, arietes de presión comúnmente vistos en las tuberías de pasta y proporcionando un sistema de bombeo estable.

La nueva bomba transporta la pasta aproximadamente 2.1 Km al subterráneo de la mina, para luego escalar 600 metros con un ángulo de inclinación de 32 grados, para finalmente ser distribuida a los distintas cámaras de relleno.

Este sistema es remotamente operado desde la sala de controles existente desde la superficie. Esto ha permitido el incremento de la capacidad operativa de la planta de pasta en un 30%, de acuerdo a las proyecciones hechas desde el inicio del proyecto.

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Tags: Pumps, Mining, Mining Pumps, Paste Backfilling, Paste Pumps

Pump Performance is Key in Nevada Mine Dewatering Operation

 

Schwing Bioset Application Report 16, Turquoise Ridge, NV

Written by Larry Trojak, Trojak Communications

Version also published in Engineering & Mining Journal 

 

Water is a critical element in any mining effort, aiding in everything from dust suppression to actual material recovery. Encountering larger volumes of it, however, can also be one of the biggest hindrances to mine production and efficiency. And when that water contains solids with trace amounts of gold, removing those solids is suddenly a very different procedure, changing from a material disposal effort to one with a focus on material recovery. Such is the case at the Turquoise Ridge gold mine near Golconda, NV, where a pair of Schwing KSP-50 sludge pumps are being used to get dewatered material to a site where its highly-valued content can be recovered. The fact that the area is 1,800 feet straight up and the material has a 40% solids content has taxed such previous efforts. However, the system currently in place has been performing flawlessly for better than nine years now, testimony to both its design and the heartiness of the equipment itself.

 

Water, Water, Everywhere . . .

The mine at Golconda, an almost decade-long joint venture between industry giants Barrick and Newmont Mining, sits on 50 square miles and has been in operation under various names and ownerships since the early 1900s. With a mine that size (current annual gold outputs at TR are in the 200,000 ounce range), encountering water is a normal part of the process and Turquoise Ridge is no exception, according to Bill Davenport, dewatering supervisor.

“It’s not uncommon to hit ‘pods’ of water or underground streams within the fractures of the rock; it is all naturally occurring water,” he says. “We have a huge development drift in the very bottom of the mine on the main decline drift and at the brow of that drift there is water coming out that just runs down the ramp. There are also areas on another drift in which we were drilling and blasting in advance of utilities and hit a pod that started releasing hot water at a rate of about 40 gallons/minute. Today, throughout the mine, we are pumping out between 650 and 700 gallons a minute—more than a million gallons a day.”

Schwing Bioset Mining Pump 

Waste? Not!

Previous efforts to deal with water issues first included using basic sumps to remove it. Mine personnel would then simply muck the residual solid material, dry it out in various drift locations and haul it to the MHD (material handling drift) to be shipped out of the mine. That all changed when it was discovered that the waste product had value.

“Back then, the residual material wasn’t being assayed for gold value so it was seen as nothing more than waste,” says Davenport. “When it was found to have a decent ore content, the whole process had to be revised. One effort included shipping the discharge water directly to a treatment process facility where it was treated for arsenic and other impurities. There, it was stored in a huge 500,000 gallon thickening tank, the solids were collected and sent on to the tailings facility using underflow thickener pumps.”

While that thought process was sound, adds Davenport, the decision to pump directly to the surface, rather than cascade-pump it from level to level, proved too much for that type of equipment. “When the pumps would fail—which was often—we would flood,” he says.

Around that same time, a hydrology study conducted by an engineering firm warned that, because of the inevitability of hitting more and more large pockets of water, a serious process upgrade was needed.

The JV team regrouped and opted for a design with clarifiers to settle out the dirt and decided that a positive displacement pump would be the best solution to handle a push of that vertical distance. In 2004, a major upgrade to the dewatering effort—including installation of a pair of 200 hp Schwing Bioset KSP 50 HDV sludge pumps—took place and has been at work ever since.

 

Positively Beneficial

Today all the water from the mining effort at Turquoise Ridge is captured through a series of multi-location, multi-level sumps and drain holes and shipped to either permanent pump skids (with 4” X 3” centrifugal pumps) or to 8” X 6” permanent pump stations. From there it is directed to a trio of 16,000 gallon clarifiers located an area in a drift adjacent to the main dewatering station. The clarifiers act as thickeners allowing the solids in the dirty water to settle out. The clear water is decanted into two other larger 19,000 gallon clear water basins. Half of that clear water is sent on for subsequent treatment and routed to rapid infiltration basins in nearby Valley; the remainder is re-used in the mining operation. Infiltrated water meets Federal drinking water standards.

“At that point, we have to dispose of the solids from the clarifiers, and the pumps make that possible,” says Davenport. “After leaving the clarifiers, that material is about 20% solids content and it has to be pumped through 3-inch pipe almost vertically for a distance of about 1,900 feet. Just after it reaches the collar of the shaft, it is discharged into a 12-inch pipe and carried roughly a mile and a half to the tailings area. That’s an amazing load to place on any piece of equipment”

When the solids content of the material gets too high for effective pumping, onsite personnel simply introduce water to the mixture using a port at the pump’s suction box, lowering the solids and enhancing flowability. Davenport says they run the pumps at the start of each shift for about three hours, and move, on average, about 15 tons of material in a 24-hour period. While performance is an obvious attribute, he is equally pleased with the pumps’ low maintenance demands, citing only a periodic change of poppets, pressure seats and ring to keep them in “fighting” shape.

“By comparison, over at one of our sister mines, we have duplex pumps working in support of autoclaves and the slurries they create. Those are extremely expensive pumps and the maintenance demands associated with them are brutal—that’s a tough one-two punch. Because mines are all about production, they have those pumps working continuously at maximum speed and, as a result, are constantly replacing pistons, rings and so on. Granted, we are only doing a fraction of the volumes they are, but we are pumping against 800 p.s.i. which is huge. As far as reliability and cost to operate, I’m certain our pumps are hands-down a better investment.

Schwing Bioset Underground Mining Pumps 

Additional Recovery

As mentioned above, even the waste product from a mine contains gold—in this case, about ¼ ounce per ton—so material that has been placed to the tailings area is far from ready for disposal.

“The material that the pumps moved out to those 13 cells is dug out and spread to dry prior to shipping it off to Newmont’s Twin Creeks facility to start the process of final recovery. At that point all the gold will have been recovered,” says Davenport

Mining is a tough application on any piece of equipment, but especially so on one that is regularly dealing with high operating pressures and abrasive material. Davenport cites the reliability of the equipment and the solid support they’ve received since installation almost a decade ago as key reasons for that ongoing success.

“My guys maintain them well; in this business you have to,” he says. “But these pumps have been extremely good at providing support to our operation. This mine is growing and its growing to a point where there might be some changes made in a couple of years. There is talk about adding another dewatering site in the lower part of the mine and installing some additional sludge pumps. I can’t say what will happen at that point, but there’s no denying we’ll be thinking about the outstanding performance we’ve gotten from the pumps.”

 

Contact us to learn more about our pumps for mining, municipal, or industrial applications.

 

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Tags: Sludge Pumps, Pumps, Mining, Mining Pumps

Schwing Bioset Wraps Up WEFTEC 2017 Tradeshow

 

Written by Kelly Kramer, October 5, 2017

The Schwing Bioset team has now wrapped up our largest trade show display of the year at WEFTEC 2017. Thank you to everyone who stopped by our booth, enjoyed breakfast in our booth, or sent one of your contacts our way. We were able to meet with friends and customers, new and old, to discuss existing and potential projects. Here are a couple of our highlights from the show. 

Capitalizing on Schwing Bioset's experience and reputation for providing high-quality equipment to the North American wastewater market, and Econity's premier MBR technology, the two companies formed a partnership for sales in North America. A licensing agreement for Schwing Bioset to promote the Econity MBR technology was formalized with a contract signing ceremony at the WEFTEC conference on October 2, 2017 in Chicago, IL. Tom Anderson from Schwing Bioset and Dr. Moon Seog Jang from Econity, presidents of their respective firms, were both on hand for the event.

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An overall integrated phosphate management plan is an important component of a wastewater plant's operations.  As new regulations come into effect requiring wastewater plants to lower their phosphorus discharges, it is becoming increasingly clear that new ways of thinking about and managing phosphorus will be necessary.  These new solutions will also address the common issue of struvite formation that create mechanical failures and maintenance issues within the plants, which increase O&M expenditures.

Schwing Bioset's Chuck Wanstrom was honored to lead a mobile session presentation during the 2017 WEFTEC exhibition, discussing current technologies available to wastewater facilities to address these issues. Included were methods to solve plant-specific issues associated with phosphorus to prevent nuisance struvite scaling, improve the diminished dewatering performance associated with biological phosphorus removal, and reduce phosphorus return loads within the plant. To learn more about how Schwing Bioset can help alleviate issues resulting from phosphorus in your plant, please view this page or contact us.

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If we weren't able to connect at the show and you'd like more information about Schwing Bioset or our products, please feel free to contact us with questions or download our brochures and application reports.

We hope to see you at one of our upcoming shows! 

 

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Tags: Announcements, Events, WEFTEC

Schwing Bioset is Exhibiting at WEFTEC 2017

 

Schwing Bioset, Inc. (SBI) is looking forward to exhibiting at the 2017 WEFTEC Event in Chicago on October 2-4. 

Please be sure to stop by our booth (#2007) while you're on the exhibit floor. We will be displaying a dewatering screw press, as well as two new pieces of equipment.

Our new Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) filtration systems for water and wastewater utilize hollow fiber membranes. The unique end-free cartridge design provides an economical alternative to traditional longer fibers.

We are also debuting our new SBI Solutions system. This pre-packaged system is configurable to produce either Class A or B Biosolids in a convenient, pre-engineered skid mounted unit. The system is a compact, modular unit including a piston pump combined with the Bioset process, and optional screw press dewatering capabilities for an all-in-one package.    

MBR.png  SBI Solutions.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The SBI team members attending the show include Executives, Regional Sales Managers, Aftermarket Support personnel, and more. If you'd like to meet with one of our team members, please email us and we'll put you in touch with the appropriate person.

Read about our Nutrient Removal and Struvite Harvesting, Dewatering Equipment, Piston Pumps, Bioset Process and Class A Biosolids, our new products, and other products hereand then stop by booth 2007 to learn more!

Visit the conference website to view the event details and exhibition map: http://www.weftec.org. Here is the Schwing Bioset listing for the show.

We hope to see you at WEFTEC 2017!


For more than 30 years, Schwing Bioset, Inc. has been helping wastewater treatment plants, mines, and industrial users by engineering solids handling solutions. Schwing Bioset’s custom-engineered solutions can be found in over a thousand facilities across North America and around the world.

Our products include, among others, sludge, industrial, and tunnel piston pumps, screw presses, nutrient removal and management, membrane bioreactors, sliding frame and push floor silos, fluid bed drying products, Bioset process for Class A Biosolids, container wagons, and screw conveyors. We also offer on-site demos, spare parts and equipment maintenance services, and training. 

 

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Tags: Bioset Process, Piston Pumps, Events, WEFTEC, Screw Press, Membrane Bioreactor

Heavy-Duty Pumps “Take the Cake” at Detroit’s Massive WWTP

 

Schwing Bioset Application Report 7, Detroit, MN

Written by Larry Trojak, Trojak Communications

Version also published in WaterWorld Magazine

 

Much like a chain, the wastewater treatment process is made up of individual segments, each linked to the next, each vital to its overall effectiveness. No single facet of the process, nor any single piece of major equipment, is more important than another; if one fails, it all suffers. Occasionally though, one piece of equipment has such challenging demands placed upon it that when it proves itself - and continues to do so for years - it bears mention.

At the Detroit Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP), a pair of heavy-duty pumps is used to take high solids-content cake from the dewatering operation to either incineration or a truck loading area.  That, in itself, is not noteworthy.  The fact that it accomplishes this both by pushing cake, dewatered to well over 20% dry solids content more than 500 linear feet, and taking it up five stories, is.  Today those pumps, a pair of Schwing Bioset KSP 110V(HD)L’s, move better than 100 wet tons of dewatered material per hour, have improved the efficiency of the incineration and haul-off operations, and have proven a key part of the system.

 Schwing Bioset Detroit WWTP Solids Pump

 

The Motor City Treatment

The first thing that strikes visitors upon arrival at Detroit’s WWTP is its sheer size. Covering several city blocks, the plant is the largest single-site wastewater treatment facility in the United States, with a capability for processing approximately 845 million gallons per day (MGD) through secondary treatment. The facility has undergone a number of major expansions since it was first built in 1940. At that time, it served Detroit and 11 neighboring communities; today it handles wastewater from 35 per cent of the state’s total population - a service area that covers 946 square miles.

The most recent of the major upgrades took place in 2004 when, according to Kenneth Paylor, Detroit WWTP’s Senior Maintenance Foreman (Solids), modifications to solids processing were included in the overall plan.

“One of the biggest changes that impacted this area of the plant was the addition of a Central Offload Facility (COF).  Up to that time, dewatered cake was taken by conveyor to a lime pad that was used to support land application for the biosolids.  When that land use was discontinued, however, an alternative was needed.  The COF, essentially a truck loading area to transfer biosolids to area landfills for disposal, is now that  alternative

 

Dewater is Different

To process its huge volumes of sludge, Detroit’s WWTP relies upon 14 incinerators located in two separate solids buildings, identified as Complex 1 and Complex 2 (C1 and C2). Solids content before dewatering ranges from 1.2 to 7% - generally in the 4.5% range. Paylor says the plant’s dewatering effort also underwent major changes in the ‘04 upgrade.

“To upgrade the dewatering operation, a number of belt presses were totally replaced and centrifuges were added in ’04,” he says. “We now dewater sludge with ten centrifuges and 22 belt presses: ten in C1, twelve in C2. Material exiting the presses has a solids content of about 23-27%; out of the centrifuges it can be in the 27-32% range.”

 

The Need to COF

In an ideal world, all of Detroit’s dewatered sludge would be sent directly to incineration, making the need for alternative disposal efforts a moot point. But this is not a perfect world and, to best deal with situations that are occasionally out of the ordinary, the COF was included in the design.

“There are times when we might have an incinerator or two that are down for maintenance and material needs to be re-routed,” says Paylor. “Another example is if our incoming volumes rise quickly - as they can after a heavy rain - and we are exceeding what we can normally handle. There was no way to avoid it; we needed a way to get material from C1 to a point where it could be hauled off site for disposal.”

Such occurrences are more commonplace than one would suspect. Even given the large number of incinerators in use and the obvious preference to keep those units fed with material to minimize fuel costs, Paylor says roughly 40% of their cake still heads to the COF. “That is when the Schwing Bioset pumps come into play: getting the cake from the belt presses in C1 to the COF where it can be treated with lime for odor control and loaded into trucks.”

 Schwing Bioset Detroit WWTP Truck Loading

 

The Long Haul

Using pumps to move cake in wastewater treatment plants is hardly a new concept. Scores of plants throughout the country—and internationally as well—have seen the benefits pumping can provide over moving material by conveyor. Improved production, better efficiency, improvements in site cleanliness and reductions in odor are just some of the gains that can be made by pumping.

“To get material to the Schwing Bioset pumps, which are located in the lowest level of the facility, a belt conveyor first collects the cake from all ten belt presses in C1,” says Paylor. “That belt feeds a Schwing push floor, which, in turn, feeds the two KSP 110V(HD)L pumps.”

With a maximum operating pressure of 1,500 psi, cake is pumped in high-pressure piping out to the COF. Mind you, it’s a fairly decent distance out to there.”

That assessment would appear to be something of an understatement. According to Keith McWilliams, Detroit’s Plant Supervisor, the distance from the C1 pumps to the COF is in excess of 500 feet. “Material first has to go up five stories—that’s 60-70 feet alone,” he says. “Then it has to make its way over to the facility, so 500 linear feet is probably a conservative guess.”

 

The Best Approach

McWilliams says there are alternatives to pumping the cake such a long distance. One of those, he says, is pumping it over to C2 where it could be dropped onto belts and taken to the COF.

“While that’s feasible, it is much better to do it this way,” he says. “Once we’ve put the cake into the pump, we may as well take it as far as we can. There is no advantage to dropping it on a belt—in fact, it’s a whole lot messier—and the pumps have shown that they can more than stand up to the challenge.”

Both Paylor and McWilliams say that since installation, the Schwing Bioset pumps, some of the largest the company makes, have been solid performers. XL model pumps were selected for Detroit WWTP based on the anticipated challenges to be placed on the units. Those particular models feature heavy duty poppets which reduce material velocity through the poppet housing. Doing so can result in a variety of benefits including: a reduction in pressure drop through the valve housing, an increased filling efficiency of the pumping cylinders, and a reduction in wear on the poppet discs, seats and pumping rams.

“In the five years the pumps have been in place, we’ve had very few issues with them, and those we’ve had, have all been minor” says Paylor. “That’s outstanding, given what they’re asked to do for roughly 30 hours every week, year round. Providing a continuous flow rate in the 150 to 200gpm range and taking it that distance is really impressive.”

 

Ongoing Changes

As mentioned, Detroit WWTP has seen its share of changes over the years, and new approaches to dealing with the biosolids are always under consideration. 

“We even have contingency plans already in place to handle things before any of those major changes occur,“ says McWilliams. “We put in different access points, for example, where the Schwing Bioset pumps could feed the conveyors in C2. 

Regardless of the direction Detroit’s WWTP takes, both McWilliams and Paylor say they are confident the pair of Schwing Bioset pumps will figure into those plans.  “Whatever happens will most likely involve further movement of the cake, says Paylor.  “And, given what we’ve seen from the pumps so far, I’m sure they can meet that challenge. They’ve been real workhorses for us.”

 

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Tags: Piston Pumps, Dewatered Sludge Cake, Wastewater Treatment Plant

Schwing Bioset Hires Mining Sales Engineer for the U.S. and Canada

 

Schwing Bioset, Inc., (SBI) is excited to announce the hire of John Brown as the new Mining Sales Engineer for the U.S. and Canada. John will oversee mining sales activities as SBI continues to expand its presence in the mining industry.

John Brown-cropped-1.jpg

John has been involved for several years in the mining and industrial sectors with a focus in sales and business development. With a degree in Chemical Engineering, he also has extensive training on hydraulic and pneumatic systems.

John has been a supplier of hydraulic components, proportional valves, and hydraulic systems solutions, and has sold business automation and instrumentation systems for the mining process. He has also been involved in different sectors of the mining industry in the extraction process, repairing and rebuilding mining drilling machines, as well as supplying components for the metallurgical process, such as conveyors and hydraulic motors. John has also sold high precision transducers to the mining arena and mobile machinery and sensors for organic solutions in the mining process.

Although born in Detroit, John has a multi-cultural background, growing up surrounded by the mining industry in Peru and Chile. Working with different cultures and mining segments has given him an exceptionally thorough overview of the industry. With his history of increasing presence internationally with former companies, and his extensive knowledge of the mining industry and processes, John is a wonderful addition to our sales team as it works to achieve its growth objectives.    

John’s office location will be in Somerset, WI, and he can be contacted at (715) 247-3433 or jbrown@schwingbioset.com. To learn more about our mining pumps, click here.

 

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Tags: Announcements, New Hire, Mining