News from Schwing Bioset

Sugar Creek WWTP Screw Press Records Impressive Data

 

Written by Tom Welch, November 2018

The Sugar Creek WWTP, owned by the Sangamon County Water Reclamation District located in Springfield, IL, has two Schwing Bioset model FSP 1102 screw presses and our Class B alkaline stabilization process. The screw presses dewater the plant’s aerobically treated biosolids and the downstream equipment produces the alkaline stabilized Class B biosolids. These biosolids are then windrowed in the District’s storage shed and eventually land applied for beneficial use. Data recorded from a recent site visit on a single screw press in operation was impressive and can be seen below.

Incoming Flow: 280 gpm
Incoming % DS: 1.5%
Throughput: 2,100 lbsdry/hr
Polymer Dose: 12 lbs/ton
Output % DS: 22%
Capture: >95%

 

Check out the included photos and operational videos, which show an overview of the installation and the equipment in action. 

Contact your Schwing Bioset Regional Sales Manager to learn more about how our biosolids management systems may be able to improve your current processes.

 

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Tags: Screw Press, Dewatering, Biosolids, Alkaline Stabilization

Schwing Bioset Offers Continuous Flow Option or Pulsation-Free System for Pumps

 

Written by John Brown, July 2018

Schwing Bioset, Inc. is pleased to announce our positive displacement pump with optional continuous flow for a pulsation-free system.

Based on the same technology used to pump concrete, our wear resistant positive displacement mining pumps have been used in both cemented and uncemented tailing applications.

Traditional piston pumps have a momentary pause in material flow through the pipeline while the discharge valve system switches in either a single or twin hydraulic circuit arrangement. In certain situations, this momentary pause in material flow can induce an undesirable water-hammer effect in the pipeline. Achieving continuous flow from the piston pump eliminates the water-hammer created by these momentary pauses in material flow.

Continuous flow is attained by operating each hydraulic cylinder of the piston pump independently.  While one cylinder is discharging, the opposite cylinder retracts at a faster rate to fill its material cylinder, then begins to move forward to pre-compress the product in the cylinder, such that it matches the system pressure. As the pumping cylinder nears the end of its stroke it begins to ramp down to zero speed.

The opposite cylinder during this period likewise ramps up its speed such that the total volume being discharged into the pipeline remains constant. Once the first cylinder arrives at a zero speed, it then retracts at an accelerated rate to charge and pre-compress its cylinder, to begin its pumping stroke again once the opposing cylinder begins to decelerate. This achieves a virtually constant flow rate, only limited by the electronic proportional control.

With this new development, each working cylinder gets a control block to support the required oil flow, independent from the other cylinder. The independently operating hydraulic cylinders are equipped with position transducers which allows their direction, position, and speed to be controlled continuously through a PLC.  

To learn more about our Mining Pumps and Pump Technology, please contact John Brown at (715) 247-3433 or visit our Mining Pumps webpage.

315 Mining Pump - Transparent 

 

Schwing Bioset ofrece la opción de flujo continuo o sistemas sin pulsaciones para bombas

Schwing Bioset se complace en anunciar la opción de flujo continuo o sistemas libres de pulsaciones en nuestras bombas de desplazamiento positivo.

Basado en la misma tecnología usada para las bombas de concreto, nuestras bombas de desplazamiento positivo resistentes al desgate han sido utilizadas en aplicaciones de relaves con cemento y sin cemento.

Las tradicionales bombas de pistones tienen una pausa momentánea en el flujo del material a través de la tubería, mientras la válvula de descarga del sistema cambia en ambos casos, ya sea un circuito simple o un circuito hidráulico doble. En ciertas ocasiones, esta pausa momentánea en el flujo de material puede inducir indeseables golpes de ariete en la tubería. Obteniendo el flujo continuo en la bomba de pistones, se eliminan los golpes de ariete creados por la momentánea pausa en el flujo de material.

El flujo continuo se obtiene operando cada cilindro hidráulico de la bomba de pistones independientemente. Cuando un cilindro está descargando, el cilindro opuesto se retrae de manera rápida para rellenar el cilindro de material, entonces empieza a moverse para pre-comprimir el producto en el cilindro, de tal manera que equilibra la presión en el sistema. Cuando el cilindro de material está cerca del final de su carrera empieza a disminuir su velocidad hasta cero. El cilindro opuesto durante este periodo igualmente aumenta su velocidad hasta que el volumen que está siendo descargado en la tubería permanece constante. Una vez que el cilindro alcanza una velocidad cero, este entonces se retrae a un rango acelerado de carga y precompresión, para empezar la carrera nuevamente una vez que el cilindro opuesto empieza a desacelerarse. Esto logra un caudal virtualmente constante, solo limitado por el control proporcional electrónico.

Con este nuevo desarrollo, cada cilindro de material tiene su propio bloque de control para obtener el flujo requerido, independiente del cilindro opuesto. Cada cilindro hidráulico de operación viene equipado con transductores de posición, los cuales permiten controlar continuamente la posición, dirección y velocidad de ambos cilindros independientemente a través de un PLC.

Para conocer más acerca de nuestras bombas para minería y su tecnología, por favor contactar a John Brown al (715) 247-3433 o visite nuestra Mining Pumps webpage.

 

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Tags: Mining, Mining Pumps

Schwing Bioset to Display Equipment at WEFTEC 2018 Exhibit

 

September 2018 

Schwing Bioset, Inc. (SBI) is once again exhibiting at the 2018 WEFTEC Technical Expo in New Orleans on October 1-3. Please be sure to stop by our booth (#2914) while you're on the exhibit floor to see our technologies and learn about how we help water and wastewater treatment plants. This year we will be showcasing several pieces of equipment.

Schwing Bioset is your complete solids handling provider, offering the widest range of high-performance screw presses, one of which will be displayed on the WEFTEC floor. Our screw press offers dewatering for those needing a cost effective, durable, efficient dewatering to reduce their volume of biosolids.

October 28, 2016-untitled-1042-smallWe will also be displaying our Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) filtration systems for water and wastewater, which utilize hollow fiber membranes. The unique end-free cartridge helps eliminate fouling experienced by fibers restrained on both ends.

Other equipment on display will be a sliding frame, biosolids piston pump, and Bioset reactor. The Bioset system is configurable to produce either Class A or B Biosolids, while each unit in the system is completely customizable to fit each plant.

Featured in the new Technology Center will be our integrated phosphorus management process offered under license from NuReSys, Fluid Bed Dryers, Container Wagons, SBI Solutions, and our marketing and hauling services.

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“WEFTEC is an exciting time for us. It gives us a chance to showcase our equipment, meet new industry contacts, and connect with prospective and current customers. We are continually enhancing our existing technologies and bringing in new product offerings, so WEFTEC is the perfect venue to display those technologies,” stated Chuck Wanstrom, Director of New Business Development for Schwing Bioset.

The SBI team members attending the show include Executives, Divisional and Regional Sales Managers, Service personnel, and more. If you'd like to meet with one of our team members, please email us and we'll put you in touch with the appropriate person to assist with your biosolids management needs.

Be sure to follow the Schwing Bioset, Inc. social media sites to see what we’re up to at the show. In the meantime, read about our MBR’s, Nutrient Management, Dewatering Equipment, Piston Pumps, Bioset Process, and other products hereand then stop by booth 2914 to learn more! You can also visit the conference website to view the event details and the exhibition map: http://www.weftec.org, and the Schwing Bioset listing for the show.

We are excited to see you at WEFTEC 2018!

 

About Schwing Bioset, Inc.

For more than 30 years, Schwing Bioset, Inc. has been helping wastewater treatment plants, mines, and industrial users by engineering solids handling solutions. Schwing Bioset’s custom-engineered solutions can be found in over a thousand facilities across North America and around the world.

Our products include, among others, sludge, industrial, and tunnel piston pumps, screw presses, nutrient removal and management, membrane bioreactors, sliding frame and push floor silos, fluid bed drying products, Bioset process for Class A Biosolids, container wagons, and screw conveyors. We also offer on-site demos, spare parts and equipment maintenance services, and training. 

 

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Tags: WEFTEC, Announcements, Events, Expos

Schwing Bioset, Inc. Now Partnering with Technosub Mining Distributor

 

Written by John Brown, July 2018

 

Technosub

Schwing Bioset, Inc. is pleased to announce that Technosub has signed as our mining distributor for Canada. With a headquarters in Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec, and nine locations across Canada, Technosub is a world-class organization recognized for its innovative and fully integrated pumping solutions in the mining and industrial water management sectors. The company sells, rents, manufactures, and repairs pumps and pumps components.

President & CEO of Technosub, Eric Beaupre, stated, “Schwing Bioset is a great complement to our line of mining and industrial products and integral engineering solutions. This allows our sales and engineering team to provide even more value and integral solutions to our customers, not just in Canada, but around the world.”

John Brown, Schwing Bioset Mining Sales Engineer, and the Schwing Bioset management team are excited about this promising partnership. John notes that, “Our positive displacement pump will be part of Technosub’s integral solutions, and in some applications part of the Mudwizard system, so Technosub will have the capability of global distribution of Schwing Bioset.” The Mudwizard system is designed to easily manage underground sludge while lowering operations costs.

The Technosub organization has a history of excellence, providing engineered solutions to the mining market globally, and supports Schwing Bioset’s mission of offering the best high solids content slurries-paste transportation and handling solutions in the mining industry. Their efforts with Canada’s engineering and procurement companies, along with local support, will benefit Schwing Bioset’s mining customers globally.

For more information, please contact John Brown at (715) 247-3433 or visit our Mining Pumps webpage.

 

MudWizard   Mining Pump

 

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Water Reclamation Facility Steps Up its Approach to Biosolids

 

Written by Larry Trojak, June 2018

 

Central Florida is One “Class A” Place

Much like the State of Florida itself, the Water Conserv II facility, located in Orlando, is all about change. Almost since its inception in 1961, Water Reclamation Facility  (WRF) has been undergoing periodic upgrades, process changes and, at times, major overhauls to keep pace. So it should come as no surprise that, when confronted with the need to replace major anaerobic digestion components that were impacting capacity, all options were on the table. And when the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) indicated that newer, tougher regulations would be impacting continued production of their Class B biosolids product, a range of alternatives was examined. The end result of those efforts is a new Class A Exceptional Quality (EQ) product created through use of the Bioset Process from Schwing Bioset, Inc. (SBI, Somerset, Wisc.) which effectively creates 120,000 lbs. of field-ready fertilizer product per day.  

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Use Then Reuse

Originally constructed in 1961 as the 4 mgd McLeod Road Treatment Plant, the Orlando facility was upgraded to 12 mgd in 1972 to deal with the area’s rapidly growing population and then further expanded to 25 mgd. Then, in the early 1980s, a number of factors, including the realization that the plant’s discharge was adversely affecting the health of nearby waterways, prompted the City of Orlando and Orange County to team up and create what is today called the Water Conserv II Distribution Center (DC) in west Orange County, about 20 miles from the Water Conserv II WRF. The DC reuses about 35 mgd of treated wastewater (reclaimed water) in west Orange County for agricultural, residential and commercial uses, as well as rapid infiltration basins (RIBs) to help with aquifer recharge. According to Paul Deuel, assistant division manager for the City of Orlando Water Reclamation Division, the scope of what was planned for the newly revised treatment plant was impressive.

“Much of this was driven by the growth we were seeing in the early 1980s and the projected impact on the aquifer that serves this area,” he said. “In addition, the EPA was mandating that discharge issues at nearby Shingle Creek be resolved. So, the Water Conserv II DC, which combined newly improved processes with the use of reclaimed water for area irrigation, was born. That last point is huge: up until then, very little agriculture involved the use of reclaimed water. The Water Conserv II DC went that route and for a long time was the largest citrus irrigation project in the world to do so.”

The move to make the resource available resulted in a contract which provided early participants access to free reclaimed water for a period of 20 years. For some, according to Deuel, the benefits proved invaluable.

“In the case of the citrus growers, this agreement provided a guaranteed water source, even in times of shortages or drought,” he said. “In addition, it could be used for frost and freeze protection when the lives of the trees themselves were at risk. Once we became established, additional users joined in over the years, including several area golf courses, Valencia Community College, Universal Studios’ theme park (which uses it both for site irrigation and in their cooling towers), the Mall at Millennia, even apartment complexes and single-family homes. It has really proven itself an invaluable resource.”

 

Time Takes a Toll

As mentioned, Conserv II WRF has been undergoing change of one sort or another since its inception. When major components in the anaerobic digestion area began to show signs of wear — and failing on an increasingly regular basis — the facility team started running the numbers to weigh the cost of shoring up the Class B biosolids operation or going in a new direction entirely.

“We started looking at the costs needed to rehab the anaerobic digesters to achieve [Class B] biosolids,” said Steve Shelnutt, Water Conserv II WRF plant manager. “At about the same time, FDEP advised us that new regulations, specific to the generation of a Class B product, were being implemented. It was obvious that continuing to do Class B was going to be more challenging and more costly. So, we began looking at alternatives available to us.”

Shelnutt said they contracted with engineering firm Black & Veatch and considered a combined heat and power process that still relied on anaerobic digestion but, because it went into the thermophilic range, it would give them the Class A EQ product they desired  “However, it also added a nutrient load back to the plant,” he said. “So, they sought to remedy that by recycling the gas it created, treating the side streams, and so on. Unfortunately, the project costs started growing into the $40-60 million capital range — far beyond what we had envisioned.”

 

Let the Games Begin

As is so often the case in any industry, word that Water Conserv II WRF was seeking alternative processing methods traveled quickly. One of the first to call upon them, according to City project manager Kristi Fries P.E., was Brian Schuette, vice president of Moss Kelly, Inc., SBI’s Florida sales representative.

“Brian came in and, based on equal parts: what the Bioset Process could do for us and its estimated costs, quickly got our attention,” said Fries. “He told us that he could take us into a Class A EQ fertilizer-grade product for about $1.8 million. Compared with the other proposal which seemed to be growing more expensive by the day, this seemed almost too good to be true. At the same time, we were hearing from other manufacturers who pitched their processes, each of which had some good points, but ultimately didn’t give us what we really needed.”

The alternatives examined included upgrading the anaerobic digesters, a process that employed a high-pressure steam pre-treatment, another which used a technique to accelerate the composting process, and others.

“We did an evaluation of capital costs for each, measured it against the proposed end-product, and decided that we would move forward with the Bioset Process,” said Shelnutt. We also took a ‘field trip’ to two different Florida locations where the process was already in operation and liked what we saw. In fact, our chief operator and I spent a good deal of time talking to the staff discussing the process and hearing how they felt about it. That really helped us make our decision.”

Bioset_Edited_Small

 

Feeling the Heat

The Bioset Process which Water Conserv II WRF has embraced takes biosolids that have been dewatered to about 15% dry solids and, using Schwing KSP-25 piston pump, routes it to a twin-screw mixer in which quicklime and sulfamic acid are added and blended. This type of mixing ensures a homogeneous product and alleviates issues such as unreacted lime in the final product — and the associated costs associated with it.

“At that point, the Schwing KSP-25 piston pump feeds material into the reactor in which heat from the acid and quicklime raises the pH level, thereby stabilizing the biosolids mixture and creating a product that meets EPA 503.33 requirements,” said Shelnutt.

Because the ammonia that is generated through addition of the lime is entrained with the biosolids inside the reactor, thereby killing the pathogens, the Bioset approach has been approved as a process to further reduce pathogens (PFRP). This approval allows the Bioset process to operate at 55°C (131°F) with a residence time of 40 minutes (versus 70°C (158°F) for 30 minutes) lowering operating costs by approximately 35%.

The stabilized Class A EQ product exits the reactor and is pumped directly to a pair of waiting trailers. Even though it is discharged from the process above 25% dry solids, the new product has very little surface tension until it cools, improving its flow characteristics and making it self-leveling in the trucks. According to Deuel, having SBI involved took care of an important step in the upgraded biosolids process: finding a customer for the end-product.

“We are fortunate in that Schwing Bioset has arrangements worked out with customers here in Florida who are anxious to take the Class A EQ material,” he said. “In this case, it is an organization called the Deseret Ranch which runs a cattle operation on about 295,000 acres (450 square miles) in Central Florida. And while they are happy to take the product in its raw form, Bioset will also accommodate customers who demand a pellet or finer product. Not having to deal with [the disposition of] the biosolids has been a nice bonus for us.”

 

Weathering the Storm

Schwing Bioset’s sister company, Biosolids Distribution Services (BDS) provided the first six months of hauling and marketing of the Class A EQ material .  Utilizing more than 15 years’ experience, BDS was able to add the production from the Water Conserv II WRF to their current operation. 

The benefit of having BDS haul Water Conserv II WRF’s Class A EQ product was felt soon after the equipment was installed, as Hurricane Irma struck in September of 2017. Due to the high-water table levels after the hurricane’s passage, virtually all sites available for Class B land application couldn’t be utilized and it wasn’t until three months later, when groundwater levels dropped, that those fields could be accessed again. The plant would likely have incurred substantial additional disposal costs taking Class B material to either landfills or longer-distance application sites that could still receive Class B biosolids. BDS and the city only missed one day of scheduled hauling — the actual day the hurricane struck. Otherwise it was business as usual leading up to and immediately after the storm.

 

The Need for Feed

Making the switch from a Class B biosolids product to a Class A EQ was not without its challenges. For example, at 371 cu. ft., the reactor installed at the Orlando site is quite large, yet the footprint in which the major components had to be installed was extremely tight. In addition, one of Water Conserv II WRF’s primary stipulations said that that their new process needed to be fully automatic.

David Bass P.E., Water Reclamation Division manager added. “We needed to automate everything. So the programming needed to achieve that was intricate and demanding. But Schwing Bioset, working with our own programmers, was able to make it happen.”

A good example of that automation at work can be found in the system’s lime feed process. At Water Conserv II WRF, should the temperature in the reactor drop, the lime feed will automatically increase; conversely, if the process is found to be running too hot, the lime feed will decrease. The program also monitors the output of the transfer pump and — whether they are running one or two dewatering presses — if the pump starts adding more sludge to the outside hopper it will also speed up the lime.

“This has taken our biosolids process to a whole new level,” says Shelnutt. ”We’ve gone from a situation in which the staff felt they needed to monitor things constantly, to one in which they are totally comfortable letting it operate as designed. Everything is now controlled by the HMI (human machine interface) on the control panel and, despite a few hiccups at the outset, it has proven an outstanding solution for us.”

 

All About the Change

In its previous Class B biosolids scenario, four belt filter presses discharged the dewatered biosolids onto two belts that led to an incline conveyor, then to a traveling conveyor which deposited it into trucks below. True to Water Conserv II WRF’s spirit of continual improvement, those two belts are in the process of being converted to screw conveyors and rather than converging in the center, will go in opposite directions and dump into a pair of Schwing KSP-25 transfer pumps.

“Those pumps take the biosolids to the Bioset unit outside,” said Shelnutt. “While it would have been great to have the entire biosolids process under one roof, size constraints made that impossible. This plant is on an area that measures less than 40-acres — relatively small for a plant of this size — and any open space we have remaining has already been slated for other use such as new clarifiers, additional aeration, etc.  However, this does allow us to keep the Bioset process close to the trailer loading area, which was also important for us.”

Shelnutt added that the system design features a pair of Schwing Bioset bulk storage silos for redundancy in the lime storage area. They will also be keeping the traveling and incline conveyors as a backup, should there be anything that results in a service interruption to the Bioset system. In that case, they can simply send material through the belt presses and haul it to another facility for processing. “It’s an option, albeit an expensive one, but it is better than being completely out of business,” he added.

The biosolids process now in place at Water Conserv II WRF is capable of processing 20 dry tons/day and Deuel said that under normal conditions they would do about half that. “Right now, however, we are pulling material that has been stored from the shutdown of the anaerobic digesters,” he said. So we are doing between three and six trailers a day, depending on hauling and plant variables.”

 

Solid Relationship

According to Shelnutt, the relationship between the Water Conserv II WRF team and Schwing Bioset has been a good one, based equally on the product’s proven performance and the company’s quick, consistent response to their needs.

“It seems like such basic business sense, but while far too many companies don’t seem to get it, Schwing Bioset does,” he said. “By way of an example: we had a problem with an acid hopper, determined that we caused the problem, and went back to the manufacturer to order a new one. They wanted more details and were dragging their feet on the replacement. SBI found out about it and interacted with that manufacturer directly to make things right. We felt that was over and above what is expected of an equipment supplier — but it’s solidified our relationship.”

Obviously, given the savings cited and the market for the product, Water Conserv II WRF’s decision to go with the Bioset process was largely based on economic concerns. However, according to David Bass, they were also committed to the idea of having a usable, in-demand product leaving their facility.

“It seems like so many biosolids management facilities are coming and going; people are losing their permits, others are opting to leave the industry, and so on,” he said. “And to a certain extent, I can see that. If we were still generating a Class B product, the increasingly stricter regulations that the FDEP and EPA are now promulgating require a much larger application setback than previous regulations. We wanted to eliminate issues like that, create a viable product, and feel good about our operation. The Bioset Process was definitely the right solution for us at this facility.”

 

To learn more about this project or how we can help your plant, contact a regional manager or email us.

  

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Tags: Wastewater Treatment Plant, Bioset Process, Class AA/EQ Biosolids, Pumps, Biosolids Storage

Dewatering with a Screw Press at Bradenton WWTP

 

Written by Chuck Wanstrom, May 2018

The city of Bradenton, Florida, operates a wastewater treatment plant that processes roughly eight million gallons per day. The plant had historically aerobically digested their biosolids and dewatered them to 15% dry solids content using two, 2.0-meter belt filter presses. Due to the age of the belt filter presses, the maintenance expenditures were continually increasing and creating a burden not only in expenses, but also on personnel time to keep the equipment functioning.

Bradenton began a search to identify new dewatering techniques that could replace the aging belt filter presses. Several pilot studies were completed and Schwing Bioset was invited to run their screw press pilot. The pilot proved successful with results of up to 21% dry solids. The Schwing Bioset screw presses were also able to fit within the confines of the available space on the second floor of the existing dewatering building. 

The Schwing Bioset equipment was chosen as the best value and was procured under a sole source contract. The two new FSP902 screw presses were designed into the existing dewatering building and were commissioned early in 2018. The dewatered biosolids exceed the old belt presses cake performance and reduces the city’s hauling and disposal costs while at the same time reducing the amount of wash water required and significantly reducing the maintenance load to city staff. 

To learn more about this project or our screw presses, contact a regional manager or email us.

 

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Tags: Screw Press, Wastewater Treatment Plant, Dewatering, Biosolids

Myra Falls Mine Opening Again with Updated Paste Pumps

 

Written by John Brown, April 2018

The Myra Falls mine, owned by Nyrstar, is located in a provincial park in central Vancouver Island (British Columbia) and is linked only by a 90 km asphalt road to the port of Campbell River. In 2002, Myra Falls constructed a paste plant to manage their tailings that included two KSP-110V(HD)L pumps with a maximum capacity of 82 m3/hr at 8.62 MPa. Each pump was equipped with hydraulic units that had a capacity of 600 HP.

For years the KSP 110’s had been pumping paste-tailings material nearly 2 miles to either a surface tailings pond or back underground to the stopes through an eight-inch pipe without any problems. Myra Falls relied on Schwing Bioset for over seven years of operation and service of the pump systems.  Economic conditions then led to the suspension of mining operations which are now scheduled to resume in 2018.

To keep the operation running as smoothly as before, an engineering analysis was performed on the existing facilities to evaluate the equipment and processes in place.  As part of this analysis, Nyrstar decided to increase the capacity of their operation by replacing the KSP 110 pumps with new KSP 140’s that provide nearly 30% more capacity and to recondition the existing power units.  The two power packs for the KSP 110’s were sent back to the Schwing Bioset factory and these 15 year old power units will be updated with the newest hydraulic designs and componentry.

The new KSP 140’s will also be using Schwing Bioset’s proprietary Ideal Control Circuit (ICC), which reduces paste flow velocity changes at the end of each pumping stroke to mitigate the pressure surges that can be seen in paste pipelines. This internal dampening system is achieved with simple position sensors and programming and avoids the complexities of other dampening systems available on the market.

The project is expected to be completed in July of 2018. For more info on our Mining Pumps, contact John Brown or visit http://www.schwingbioset.com/mining-pumps.

 

Schwing Bioset Piston Pump for Myra Falls Mine

(Photo shows one of the Myra Falls pumps in the Schwing Bioset facility being prepped to ship to the job site).

 

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Tags: Mining Pumps, Piston Pumps, Paste Pumps

Metro WWTP Upgrades Piston Pump Sludge Flow Measurement System

 

Written by Chuck Wanstrom, March 2018

 

The Metro WWTP, operated by the Metropolitan Council of Environmental Services (MCES), located in St. Paul, MN, has an average daily flow of 215 million gallons per day (MGD) of incoming flow. Prior to 2004 the plant had been utilizing multi-hearth incinerators to burn their biosolids. A new incineration facility utilizing fluid bed technology was commissioned in 2004 and included a dewatered biosolids storage and feed system supplied by Schwing Bioset, Inc (SBI).

The feed system included four sliding frame silos providing intermediate storage of dewatered cake to provide a buffer in centrifuge and incinerator operations. Each of the four sliding frame silos were equipped with two KSP 45V(HD)L piston pumps to transport the dewatered cake to the incinerators. Each piston pump is equipped with a dual discharge to split the biosolids flow to multiple incinerator injection points, as well as a Sludge Flow Measuring System (SFMS) to measure within 5% the amount of biosolids being pumped into the incinerator. The SFMS is a critical piece of the operation as this is required to satisfy US EPA reporting requirements. This proven equipment configuration and flow measuring system has been utilized at numerous other facilities across North America for over 20 years.

Schwing Bioset has recently developed an improvement in its SFMS to reduce the possible sources of error that can be introduced with variations in pumping speed during operation. This next generation of SFMS results in an even more accurate means of recording and reporting biosolids flow and is further evidence of Schwing Bioset’s commitment to developing and improving its technology to better serve its family of customers. After nearly 15 years of reliable service, the Metro plant, and its continuing commitment to excellence, is currently in the process of performing upgrades throughout its Solids Management Building and is converting its piston pumps to this next generation of flow measurement. Schwing Bioset looks forward to many more years of supporting MCES and to the continued success of this impressive facility.

If you are currently using an SBI pump equipped with our SFMS and would like more information on upgrading your equipment to the latest generation of flow measurement, please contact us at (715) 247-3433 or schwingbioset.com/contact-us.

 

WWTP Schwing Bioset Piston Pump

 

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Tags: Piston Pumps, Wastewater Treatment Plant, Biosolids

Schwing Bioset is Offering Two KSP Pump Training Seminars in 2018

 

Posted by Kelly Kramer, January 2018

 

The Schwing Bioset Service Team is excited to announce that it will be holding two KSP Pump Training Seminars in 2018!

Both sessions will be in May at our facility in Fort Myers, Florida. Attendees will join our instructors for classroom and hands-on KSP Pump Training and learn how to properly use, maintain, and troubleshoot pump equipment. They will have the chance to learn more about basic hydraulics, poppet valves, power packs, setting pressures, screw feeders, troubleshooting, and more!

The regular cost to register is $1295, but if you register early (by February 14th) you can receive $245 off of your registration fee. Our classes do fill up, so please reserve your spot now. 

The deadline to register for the spring seminars is March 23rd. You can get more information and registration forms at the link below.

For questions or to register, please contact Ashley at ahinrichs@schwingbioset.com or (715) 247-3433. 

 Click Here for Info on our   KSP Pump Training 

 

Schwing Bioset Pump Training Seminar    

 

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Tags: KSP Service Seminar, Events, Pumps, Announcements

Schwing Bioset is Exhibiting at Several Events in 2018

 

Schwing Bioset, Inc. is excited to be attending and exhibiting at several conventions and expos throughout 2018. If you'd like to meet with one of our team members at a show, please email us and we'll put you in touch with the appropriate person.

Below is a list of water, wastewater, and mining events that we are scheduled to attend for the coming year. We will keep this information updated throughout the year. One new show for us is the AMTA Membrane Technology Conference in West Palm Beach.

For more than 30 years, Schwing Bioset, Inc. has been helping wastewater treatment plants, mines, and power generation customers by engineering solids handling solutions. Schwing Bioset’s custom-engineered solutions can be found in hundreds of wastewater treatments plants in North America, as well as mines and tunnels around the world.

Our products include, among others, sludge, industrial, and tunnel piston pumps, dewatering screw presses, sliding frame and push floor silos, fluid bed drying products, container wagons, Bioset process equipment for Class A biosolids, phosphorus removal and struvite recovery, and soil conditioners. We also offer spare parts, equipment maintenance services, and customer pump training. 

Read about our newest product, our Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) Process Technology, and other products hereand then stop by one of our booths to learn more! 

Show Dates Place
Michigan AWWA / MWEA Joint Expo Feb. 6-7 Lansing Center, Lansing, MI
Pacific Water Conference Feb. 7-8 Hawaii Convention Center, Honolulu, HI
MWWA (Manitoba) Annual Conference Feb. 25-28 Keystone Centre, Brandon, MB
SME Annual Conference & Expo Feb. 25-28 Minneapolis Convention Center, Minneapolis, MN
MRWA Water & WW Technical Conference March 6 River's Edge Convention Center, St. Cloud, MN
AMTA Membrane Technology Conference & Expo  March 12-16 Palm Beach Co. Conv. Center, West Palm Beach, FL
Florida Water Resources Conference FWRC April 15-18 Ocean Center, Daytona Beach, FL
CWEA 2018 Annual Conference April 17-20 Sacramento Convention Center, Sacramento, CA
Exposición Internacional Minera April 18-20 Maverick Factor, San Juan, Argentina
Texas Water - AWWA Texas Section April 23-26 Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio, TX
AWW & WEA Arkansas April 29 - May 2 Hot Springs Conv. Center, Hot Springs, AR
AZ Water Association Annual Conference & Expo May 2-4 Phoenix Convention Center, Phoenix, AZ
CIM 2018 Convention May 6-8 Vancouver Convention Centre, Vancouver, BC
WEF Residuals & Biosolids Conference May 15-18 Phoenix Convention Center, Phoenix, AZ
WEF Nutrient Removal & Recovery Conference June 18-21 Hilton Midtown, Raleigh, NC
KY-TN Water Professionals Conference July 8-11 Music City Center, Nashville, TN
OAWWA/OWEA One Water Ohio Aug. 27-30 Columbus Convention Center, Columbus, OH
WaterJAM Sept. 10-13 Virginia Beach Convention Center, Virginia Beach, VA
WEFTEC 2018 Sept. 29 - Oct. 3 Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, New Orleans, LA
WWOA Annual Conference Oct. 16-19 Grand Geneva Resort, Lake Geneva, WI
PNCWA 2018 Oct. 21-24 Boise Center, Boise, ID

 

Schwing Bioset 2018 Tradeshows WEFTEC

 

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Tags: Events, Announcements, WEFTEC, Expos