News from Schwing Bioset

The Anatomy of Pumping Biosolids Into Incinerators (part 2)

Considering the volume of biosolid waste that the average incineration system can process for its size, installing one in a biosolids handling facility is often the most economical choice. Additionally, having the ability to dispose of material on site will reduce or eliminate external handling and processing costs.  Operational efficiency, on the other hand, is controlled in large part by the support equipment that supplies material for incineration. To operate at optimal efficiency the incinerator needs to receive material at a steady flow that is high in solids content. Under proper conditions many modern incinerators can achieve what is known as a “free burn” which is when dry material (usually more than 22% solids) can be steadily burned without the addition of fuel oil. In order to achieve this level of efficiency, high quality dewatering and sludge delivery equipment are needed.   

 

Schwing Bioset piston pumps have become a market leader in pumping high solids material to incinerations across North America. In many cases the pumps receive material that is in access of 25% solids and pump it to the incinerator where line pressures can easily exceed 1,000 psi. This is accomplished by linear rams and driven by a hydraulic system operating at pressures up to 4,000 psi. The power is supplied using soft switch & ideal switch technology that not only limits hard shifts at those pressures but still allows an even material flow, so burning at the incinerator is not interrupted. Schwing pumps are also supplied with a patented Sludge Flow Measuring System (SFMS) that accurately measures material volume going into the incinerator. It is essential to track these metrics as well as emissions in order to comply with all federal regulations.        

Tags: Biosolids Processing, Wastewater Treatment, Biosolids Handling